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Survey: 35% of U.S. Consumers Planning to Purchase Next-Generation iPhone

Earlier this week, shopping comparison site PriceGrabber released the results of a survey of nearly 3,000 U.S. online consumers conducted earlier this month, revealing that 35% of respondents intend to purchase the next-generation iPhone. The strong consumer interest comes even as Apple has to yet announce or even acknowledge such a device and with rumors offering conflicting information on what users can expect from the next-generation iPhone.
Anticipation in the consumer electronics world is soaring for the launch of Apple's iPhone 5, which is rumored to be hitting store shelves this fall. PriceGrabber, a part of Experian, just released the results of its iPhone 5 survey, revealing that 35 percent of consumers plan to purchase the latest iPhone upon its release. Of these respondents, 51 percent indicated that they will buy the smartphone within the first year of release, 30 percent will purchase it before the end of 2011, 14 percent will buy it within the first month, and 7 percent will buy it within the first week. Conducted from July 1-11, 2011, the survey includes responses from 2,852 U.S. online consumers.
Apple leads the smartphone pack among the surveyed customers, with 48% of respondents stating that they "prefer" iOS and Android coming in at a distant second place with 19%.


For the next-generation iPhone, consumers most frequently cited improved battery life as a key feature they'd like to see, with 59% of respondents selecting the option in the survey. Measuring in close behind at 56% was a lower price point. Other popular desired features include a larger screen and an improved camera.

Interestingly, 46% of respondents indicated that "4G" compatibility is an important feature for the next iPhone, even with a separate survey recently revealing that one-third of current iPhone users mistakenly think that they already have 4G compatibility. The "4G" marketing term has come to embrace both HSPA+ and LTE network standards, and while the next-generation iPhone is expected to feature HSPA+ compatibility, Apple has been said to be holding off on LTE compatibility until more appropriate chips are available.



Top Rated Comments

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99 months ago
Misleading Headline

How did you make the leap from 35% of people who visited pricegrabber and agreed to take a survey said they would buy an iPhone 5 to 35% of American consumers will buy the iPhone 5 sight unseen?
Rating: 15 Votes
99 months ago

This is not true.


Actually, it is true. Not everyone buys android because it's free, but many people do. I shouldn't have said "sole fact" though. It's a decent OS too, which is why people will buy it over iOS, but many of those people would rather get iPhones.
Rating: 13 Votes
99 months ago
I would like 4G even though I don't know what it is :)
Rating: 10 Votes
99 months ago
Hang on. 35% of Americans?

Only 35% of Americans with cell phones have a smart phone to begin with.

That just doesn't pass the smell test.

First off, ~85% of american Adults have a cell phone right now.

That would mean that more than 40% of those are planning on getting an iPhone 5?!

Right now 25% of smart phones in use are iPhones. That means right now less than 9% of Americans with a cell phone have some form of iPhone.

A huge number, but even if iPhone use among smartphone users doubled, AND smartphone use in general doubled, you still wouldn't get to 35% of Americans using an iPhone, and that assumes that EVERYONE with any previous iPhone would replace it with an iPhone 5.

I know a lot of people with iPhones, but a lot of those are still 3GS models, or even 3G models. One guy in my office still has his original iPhone that he bought on day 1. He is going to get an iPhone4 when the 5 comes out.

That 35% number is just not adding up.
Rating: 7 Votes
99 months ago

No 4G/LTE is a deal-breaker for most people that buy phones unsubsidized.

Seriously, I've had 50Mb/s 4G/LTE since December 2009. And it's STILL not in a new Apple phone. :rolleyes:

That's why Apple will always lose global market share to Samsung/HTC. In addition to the previous no-unsubsidized crap from previous iPhones.


Yea ok, on what planet?

No one cares, sorry. What backwards, unintelligible post.
Rating: 5 Votes
99 months ago
I wish I could pre-order right now.
Rating: 4 Votes
99 months ago

Im on wifi most of the time, so lte isn't all that necessary.


Plus LTE/WiMAX eat battery like crazy in their current form. My EVO is useless with 4G (WiMAX) turned on.

Just bring the iPhone to Sprint already!
Rating: 4 Votes
99 months ago

You have a very good point. I think it should read, "35% of people in the market for a smartphone, will buy the next gen iPhone."


No it should read - 35% of people in the market for a smartphone AND choose to take the survey will buy the next gen iPhone. Chosing to take the survey is a HUGE statistical bias toward buying the product associated with the survey. The real % is considerably smaller, I'm sure.

Tony
Rating: 4 Votes
99 months ago

This is not true.


It is most definitely true that many people turn to Android because the phone is free. Android hands have become SOOOOO commoditized. It's a sad state of fragmentation and ******* hardware. It's not at all an open system, it's a feudal system.
Rating: 3 Votes
99 months ago

Actually, it is true. Not everyone buys android because it's free, but many people do. I shouldn't have said "sole fact" though. It's a decent OS too, which is why people will buy it over iOS, but many of those people would rather get iPhones.


You don't even have to argue that fact. If you do some searching around, you'll find those Neilsen surveys (along with a few other) from late last year that showed a whopping 25% of current Android users were planning to buy an iPhone next time around. The same surveys showed about %7 of iPhone owners planning to jump ship.

If you believe all these consumer surveys, it would seem that Android is good at grabbing first-time buyers but lousy and making long-term customers of them. No coincidence that many Android owners I know are planning to move to an iPhone. Don't know anyone planning to go the other way however.
Rating: 3 Votes

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