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Verizon iPhone Prelaunch Testing: "Acme" Code Name, Text Check-Ins to Ensure Security


TechnoBuffalo shares claimed details of Verizon's internal testing for the iPhone 4, highlighting security measures taken by Apple and the carriers to maintain control over the test units.

According to the report, a small number of Verizon employees were provided with iPhones two weeks before the public debut, using them out in the field to ensure that there were no last-minutes hitches in real-world performance. Staffers receiving iPhones were of course required to sign non-disclosure agreements regarding the new hardware, which the source unsurprisingly describes as being above and beyond what is typically required for unreleased hardware. Those privy to the testing process were also reportedly instructed to never refer to the iPhone by name, instead using the code name "Acme" to refer to the device.

But what is particularly interesting are the security methods reportedly employed to help ensure that the handsets remained in the possession of the testers, a system that required testers to manually report in on their devices every twelve hours.
Our source describes a unique protocol requiring staffers to text a secret PIN code to a dedicated phone number every 12 hours. This served as ongoing confirmation that the handset was still in the proper hands. So no PIN code, no functionality.
Early field testing in Apple Stores around the country reportedly began as much as six months ahead of the Verizon iPhone's launch, but it was only in the last several weeks before launch that testing opened up beyond engineering staff to a broader, albeit still select, group of Verizon employees. As is par for the course with Apple product releases, the vast majority of Verizon employees were kept in the dark about the iPhone testing and launch plans.

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111 months ago
Friend goes to his buddy and asks what phone do u have there

Oh it's the ACME

Friend goes - no seriously what is that ?

It's the AcME!



Yah that's believable :)


They should Of called it a Samsung Captivate and no one would suspect a thing! ;)
Rating: 5 Votes
111 months ago
Simply LOVE IT! "Jobs, James Jobs". or more likely, "Cook, James Cook". :apple:
Rating: 1 Votes
111 months ago


But what is particularly interesting are the security methods reportedly employed to help ensure that the handsets remained in the possession of the testers, a system that required testers to manually report in on their devices every twelve hours.

Why the departure from "Can you hear me now?" every minute?
Rating: 1 Votes
111 months ago

If there were performance problems with less than two weeks before the public release, would Verizon really have enough time to do anything about it?

And if an employee missed the 12-hour deadline, what would they do? Send thugs after them?


I am hearing if they missed the deadline they would become the first members of the Human Centipad
Rating: 1 Votes
111 months ago
Microsoft just sent me an Xbox 360 to test.....they said to be very quiet about it....
Rating: 1 Votes
111 months ago
No PIN Code = Pit Stop to German Bier Garden. :D
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Rating: 1 Votes
111 months ago
PUSH THE BUTTON



if u dont, SJ is going to hunt ur ass down
Rating: 1 Votes
111 months ago



Hmmm I wonder what the passcode was for. Because apple already have the ability to brick the phone remotely. Apart from the Hot Spot feature the software was identical.


How do we know there wasn't an additional bit of code used? After all, it was in testing for 6 months. Then remove the addition and out the door.
Rating: 1 Votes
111 months ago
No surprises here but I still find this kind of 'Apple-secrecy' story fascinating to read every time we hear about one.
Rating: 1 Votes
111 months ago
I don't see really what the point of hiding a one year old phone, was, but it was a good idea for the check ins.
Rating: 0 Votes

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