BritBox UK Streaming Service Launches for £5.99 per Month

BritBox, a streaming service offering shows from ITV, the BBC, Channel 4 and Channel 5, has launched in the United Kingdom (via BBC).


Priced at £5.99 a month, the joint-venture between ITV and the BBC is being pitched as an additional streaming service for viewers who want to view classic British television programs and films, rather than as a direct competitor to Netflix.

BritBox will mostly feature classic series like Cracker, Prime Suspect, Brideshead Revisited, Ashes to Ashes, with comedies including Absolutely Fabulous, Extras, Blackadder and Fawlty Towers. Some archive programs that have been on services like Netflix will now move to BritBox.

More than 600 classic episodes of Doctor Who will be available to stream by Christmas, while shows and movies from Channel 4 and Film4's back catalog will be available in 2020, and original shows from Comedy Central UK will also feature.

Other shows available on the service include Downton Abbey, Gavin & Stacey, Wolf Hall, Love Island and Broadchurch, but it will also include new shows, starting with the drama Lambs of God, which stars The Handmaid's Tale's Ann Dowd, The End of the F****** World's Jessica Barden, and Essie Davis from The White Princess as nuns living on a remote island.

However, some of ITV and the BBC's biggest hits of recent years, such as Killing Eve, Peaky Blinders, and Bodyguard, will not be on it at first, either due to deals with other streaming platforms or because they are still on the broadcasters' own catch-up platforms.


The Guardian reports that the streaming venture has been given a major boost through deals with BT, Channel 4, and mobile company EE.

One of the deals will make BritBox available to tens of millions of EE mobile customers across the U.K., while a wider deal with BT – which owns EE – will make Britbox available to the millions of customers who subscribe to its pay-TV service.

Meanwhile, Channel 4 will provide thousands of hours of TV and film content to BritBox as part of a three-year deal, meaning shows from all the U.K.'s main TV channels will be available on one catch-up platform for the first time.

BritBox enters a streaming market long-dominated by Netflix and Amazon Video, but now quickly flooding with rival services jostling for attention. Apple TV+ launched last week featuring $2 billion worth of original programming, while Disney+ is due to arrive on November 12 boasting 500 feature films and over 7,500 shows, including the entire Pixar library and a raft of original content.

BritBox is available in the U.K. via iOS and Android apps, ‌Apple TV‌, web browsers, and "smart" Samsung TVs released in 2017 or later. BritBox launched in the U.S. two years ago with a different catalog of content and has attracted 650,000 subscribers.

Top Rated Comments

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2 weeks ago
Already paid for these shows with my TV license, now they want me to pay again, Get stuffed BBC.
Rating: 26 Votes
2 weeks ago


Why is this newsworthy on this site if it’s a UK-only service?

Because believe it or not this site serves a global community
Rating: 26 Votes
2 weeks ago


Already paid for these shows with my TV license, now they want me to pay again, Get stuffed BBC.


Well no... You paid for a service to make and present you programs within that year. Many of the programmes were made a long time ago and likely you were not paying for them then. Ironically the Licence fee should be called a subscription...but of course it's basically a compulsory tax.

Point in case. Every Doctor who before about 2000 I never funded though the licence. should I be allowed access to it forever? Does it instantly become public domain? Or Fawlty Towers,

I am guessing with your indignation you have NEVER bought a DVD / VHS / Digital content of anything ever... because you are basically arguing that if you have seen it once you own it and you should have it for free again.

The content is really pretty good and I am sure they will add more in the future... BUT I do think it should be about £40 a year.
[URL unfurl="true"]https://reelgood.com/source/britbox[/URL]
Rating: 15 Votes
2 weeks ago
Look, we're British. We'll moan about it and then queue in an orderly fashion.
Rating: 10 Votes
2 weeks ago
This is getting silly now. It's actually cheaper now to get a freaking cable subscription than all of these streaming services.
Rating: 10 Votes
2 weeks ago


Already paid for these shows with my TV license, now they want me to pay again, Get stuffed BBC.

How different is this to people buying DVDs of BBC Shows? There is none.
Rating: 9 Votes
2 weeks ago
Why not the rest of Europe?
Rating: 7 Votes
2 weeks ago


Why is this newsworthy on this site if it’s a UK-only service?


Why is Disney Plus newsworthy if it's not available in the UK?
Rating: 7 Votes
2 weeks ago


If the BBC can accept a subscription model for some of its “back catalogue” then there’s no reason why a similar model couldn’t work for its current output. Go entirely subscription-based and remove the unpopular TV licence.


There's a very big reason it won't work for its current content.

Do you really only want TV shows that will make money? Because that's what'll happen. Whether or not a show gets made will depend entirely on profitability - will it drive subscription revenue.

Profitability's a good metric. But it should by no means be the only one.

I watch the odd show on BBC Four - an arts and culture channel. Some of these shows are actually quite impressively made. I can't for a second believe that BBC Four's viewership would pay for the same quality in a subscription model.

I listen to about 8 BBC podcasts. Would they be supportable entirely through subscription? I donate ~£12 to the Maximum Fun podcast network, and that's just two shows I listen to. The licence fee for *all* BBC services is about the same price.

Believe it or not, I'm *pleased* that through the licence fee, I help fund TV, Radio and Film for members of the British public who are nothing like me. I love that we have Scots and Gaelic channels that can produce good quality programming for those communities which they otherwise couldn't afford for themselves. It's hugely important that someone in China or the middle-east who's risked punishment to access the BBC can click a button and get the BBC's content in Arabic or Mandarin.
Rating: 6 Votes
2 weeks ago
This fragmentation of streaming is going to send everyone back to piracy.
Rating: 5 Votes

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