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Apple Releases macOS Mojave 10.14.5 Boot Camp Update to Address iMac and Mac Mini Bug

Apple today released a new macOS Mojave 10.14.5 Boot camp update, which is designed to address a bug that prevented the creation of a new Boot Camp partition on a iMac or Mac mini with a Fusion Drive.

The new software can be downloaded from Apple's support document accompanying the update.

The software update is available for iMac and Mac mini users, and won't be available to those who have other Mac machines.

Boot Camp is designed to allow Mac users to set up a partition to run Windows, providing access to PC-only apps and content.

Apple's Boot Camp update for macOS 10.14.5 comes about a month after the release of the macOS Mojave 10.14.5 update.

Related Roundup: macOS Mojave


Top Rated Comments

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3 days ago at 12:23 pm
How about letting Boot Camp assistant install Windows on the SSD portion of the Fusion Drive?

How about updating Boot Camp Control Panel in Windows to support ‘retina resolutions’, APFS to be able to select Boot partition or reboot to macOS?

How about releasing a APFS Windows driver to be able to read macOS files?

How about adding NTFS write compatibility to macOS.


Simple thing. Apple is doing nothing to solve them.
Rating: 6 Votes
3 days ago at 12:52 pm

Windows 10 support yet? (It's been a while since I used Boot Camp and, then, it would only support Windows 7 - not even SP1.)


Boot Camp has supported Win 10 for a few years now...I think since 2016. That's how long I've had it installed on my MacBook Pro through Boot Camp.
Rating: 3 Votes
3 days ago at 12:47 pm

Just installed 10.14.6 some minutes ago...

I think 10.14.6 is still in beta, it doesn't show up here under normal releases in software update.
Rating: 3 Votes
3 days ago at 11:58 am

That only took a year...


You can install windows without bootcamp.
Rating: 2 Votes
3 days ago at 03:43 pm

I used to use Boot Camp quite frequently, but I haven't even set it up on my last couple of Macs. For what I need Windows for, something like Parallels, VirtualBox, or even Crossover works fine and is much more convenient.

I'd be curious to know what people use Boot Camp for nowadays. I would expect hardcore gamers to have actual (physical) Windows boxes, given that Macs aren't exactly graphics powerhouses.


To get native speed for games, mostly (not a hardcore gamer). I also have Fusion use the Boot Camp partition so I can run Windows as a VM when I don't need the native speed. TBH, I run it as a VM way more than native anyway.
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Boot Camp has supported Win 10 for a few years now...I think since 2016. That's how long I've had it installed on my MacBook Pro through Boot Camp.


Driver support depends on the model Mac you have. My old 2009 mini only supported Windows 7. My new iMac (only?) supports Windows 10.
Rating: 1 Votes
3 days ago at 11:42 am
That only took a year...
Rating: 1 Votes
3 days ago at 12:44 pm

How about letting Boot Camp assistant install Windows on the SSD portion of the Fusion Drive?

How about updating Boot Camp Control Panel in Windows to support ‘retina resolutions’, APFS to be able to select Boot partition or reboot to macOS?

How about releasing a APFS Windows driver to be able to read macOS files?

How about adding NTFS write compatibility to macOS.


Simple thing. Zero effort from Apple to solve them.


You're wrong. That would require more than just a trivial amount of work on Apple's part.

1. That would require the macOS volume suffer, performance wise.
2. It does.
3. One day, perhaps.Writing a driver for APFS support is a non trivial matter.
4. This has been discussed numerous times. NTFS is Microsoft IP; Apple would have to license such a driver.
Rating: 1 Votes
3 days ago at 12:03 pm
the previous solution was to backup, wipe drive, and restore or something like that so this is a welcomed update if it works...
Rating: 1 Votes
2 days ago at 07:30 pm

I used to use Boot Camp quite frequently, but I haven't even set it up on my last couple of Macs. For what I need Windows for, something like Parallels, VirtualBox, or even Crossover works fine and is much more convenient.

I'd be curious to know what people use Boot Camp for nowadays. I would expect hardcore gamers to have actual (physical) Windows boxes, given that Macs aren't exactly graphics powerhouses.

Sometimes there’s just that one or two Windows software that is not available on the Mac that requires non virtualized environment. Or sometimes people are in a work environment where the IT simply doesn’t support Macs/virtualized OS. And those who need Windows but don’t want to pay extra or be bothered with virtualization.
Rating: 1 Votes
2 days ago at 01:42 pm

I have a 2012 iMac 13,2 with a 3TB Fusion Drive. When I updated to macOS Mojave, I loss my Windows Partition. I was hoping this update would address this issue but after installing the file I still can not install Boot Camp. I was wondering if anyone had any luck after this update.

I have the same machine with the same drive, and I came to the comment thread specifically looking to see if anyone else had tried this; so thanks for your insights on this.

That said, I'm afraid I'm not surprised that it didn't fix the issue for 2012 iMacs. My understanding is its a rather complicated matter, in this very specific configuration, but here's my best attempt at a layman's interpretation of the situation: Going forward, the 2012 models are no longer going to be able to support Windows installations on hard drives which exceed 2TB, in part because Windows itself does not support boot volumes outside of the first 2TB of the hard drive on that generation of hardware -- and possibly in conjunction with bugs associated with the partitioning scheme required to accomplish the installation of Windows, within those constraints. So in previous versions of Bootcamp, it sliced up the hard drive so that it basically looks something like this ...

|----- MacOS Hard Drive (partition 1 of volume 1) ----- | (Windows size minus 2TB)

| -- Windows (volume 2) -- | (2TB)

| ---- MacOS Hard Drive (partition 2 of volume 1) ---- | (3TB)

... where the sizes indicated at the end of each line are the location on the disk at which that partition ends.

At the time, I thought Apple had come up with a really slick and interesting method for solving that 2TB boundary. I guess Apple has concluded that that's not so much true anymore.
Rating: 1 Votes

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