Apple Releases macOS Mojave 10.14.5 Boot Camp Update to Address iMac and Mac Mini Bug

Apple today released a new macOS Mojave 10.14.5 Boot camp update, which is designed to address a bug that prevented the creation of a new Boot Camp partition on a iMac or Mac mini with a Fusion Drive.

The new software can be downloaded from Apple's support document accompanying the update.

The software update is available for ‌iMac‌ and ‌Mac mini‌ users, and won't be available to those who have other Mac machines.

Boot Camp is designed to allow Mac users to set up a partition to run Windows, providing access to PC-only apps and content.

Apple's Boot Camp update for macOS 10.14.5 comes about a month after the release of the macOS Mojave 10.14.5 update.

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25 weeks ago
How about letting Boot Camp assistant install Windows on the SSD portion of the Fusion Drive?

How about updating Boot Camp Control Panel in Windows to support ‘retina resolutions’, APFS to be able to select Boot partition or reboot to macOS?

How about releasing a APFS Windows driver to be able to read macOS files?

How about adding NTFS write compatibility to macOS.


Simple thing. Apple is doing nothing to solve them.
Rating: 7 Votes
25 weeks ago

I have a 2012 iMac 13,2 with a 3TB Fusion Drive. When I updated to macOS Mojave, I loss my Windows Partition. I was hoping this update would address this issue but after installing the file I still can not install Boot Camp. I was wondering if anyone had any luck after this update.

I have the same machine with the same drive, and I came to the comment thread specifically looking to see if anyone else had tried this; so thanks for your insights on this.

That said, I'm afraid I'm not surprised that it didn't fix the issue for 2012 iMacs. My understanding is its a rather complicated matter, in this very specific configuration, but here's my best attempt at a layman's interpretation of the situation: Going forward, the 2012 models are no longer going to be able to support Windows installations on hard drives which exceed 2TB, in part because Windows itself does not support boot volumes outside of the first 2TB of the hard drive on that generation of hardware -- and possibly in conjunction with bugs associated with the partitioning scheme required to accomplish the installation of Windows, within those constraints. So in previous versions of Bootcamp, it sliced up the hard drive so that it basically looks something like this ...

|----- MacOS Hard Drive (partition 1 of volume 1) ----- | (Windows size minus 2TB)

| -- Windows (volume 2) -- | (2TB)

| ---- MacOS Hard Drive (partition 2 of volume 1) ---- | (3TB)

... where the sizes indicated at the end of each line are the location on the disk at which that partition ends.

At the time, I thought Apple had come up with a really slick and interesting method for solving that 2TB boundary. I guess Apple has concluded that that's not so much true anymore.
Rating: 3 Votes
25 weeks ago

Just installed 10.14.6 some minutes ago...

I think 10.14.6 is still in beta, it doesn't show up here under normal releases in software update.
Rating: 3 Votes
25 weeks ago

Windows 10 support yet? (It's been a while since I used Boot Camp and, then, it would only support Windows 7 - not even SP1.)


Boot Camp has supported Win 10 for a few years now...I think since 2016. That's how long I've had it installed on my MacBook Pro through Boot Camp.
Rating: 3 Votes
25 weeks ago
That only took a year...
Rating: 2 Votes
25 weeks ago

That only took a year...


You can install windows without bootcamp.
Rating: 2 Votes
25 weeks ago
the previous solution was to backup, wipe drive, and restore or something like that so this is a welcomed update if it works...
Rating: 1 Votes
20 weeks ago



How about updating Boot Camp Control Panel in Windows to support ‘retina resolutions’, APFS to be able to select Boot partition or reboot to macOS?


Shouldn't the Windows drivers for your GPU support higher resolutions? What's Apple got to do with it? I've read the iMac Pro version of Boot Camp supports selecting APFS drives to boot from and there's a way to force install it. Why in the world Apple has not released that update to everyone is utterly beyond me. For such a rich company with so many resources, it always seems like they don't have enough programmers to do things that even tiny 3rd party companies manage to do...kind of ridiculous, IMO.


How about releasing a APFS Windows driver to be able to read macOS files?


I just bought MacDrive. It lets me read/write HFS+ volumes (e.g. I can let KODI read my HFS+ external USB3 media drives from Windows 10 on my Mac Mini now. So far, zero issues here. It also has a beta APFS driver that is currently read only, but my APFS Mojave drive is perfectly readable from Windows 10 now with it. Everything works as a regular file system (no special programs needed to transfer files and thus KODI works, etc. fine. I think that was worth $60 to me. Apple will never bother.


How about adding NTFS write compatibility to macOS.


Apple is cheap. They licensed SMB3 I think for one OS version and then decided to write their own code to avoid paying Microsoft a dime. It's been buggy ever since.... Here, I bought Tuxera NTFS and I can read/write NTFS and format drives as well no problem. Between the two, I have full interoperability between operating systems other than read only for APFS from Windows 10 (for now until it's out of beta; you wouldn't want a bug causing an error on the drives by releasing it too soon).


Simple thing. Apple is doing nothing to solve them.


Apple isn't about solving problems these days. They're about making money and that means phones phones and more phones. They couldn't care less about Macs anymore. Jony Ive even had enough and left.

My current problem is stranger. I bought a Samsung 2TB SSD for my 2012 Mac Mini (and 16GB ram upgrade) and installed Windows 10 boot camp from El Capitan on a 400GB partition (leaving 1.6TB for OS X). I then upgraded El Capitan to Mojave. Everything seemed to be working fine (other than the lack of being able to change the startup drive from BootCamp). I then turned TRIM on in Mojave. It failed to boot. After much recovery playing around (first aid showed no errors after the first time), it somehow decided to boot OK. Everything seemed fine and write speeds were back up to over 500MB/sec here (Windows 10 had TRIM on all the time and also had those speeds). But sometimes when I reboot the computer and/or switch to OS X after using Windows 10 (which boots correct every time and in less time than OS X even), it just gives an Apple logo and no boot progress (light to my optical mouse is out and the USB3 hub....)

I boot in VERBOSE (CMD-V) mode and it goes into this weird reboot mach kernel loop (like a goto print in basic programming) and before that point is goes so fast I can't see the last thing it's trying to do (I might have to video it to find out as I know of no way to pause or slow it down). I then have to play with recovery, etc. (can't point to any single thing that works; it just eventually boots OK again; I thought it was startup selection the one time and a manual bless command another time, but neither seem reliable). So now I don't want to exit OS X as it might not come up again without headaches of trying to get it to boot. I've tried resetting PRAM, NVRAM, etc. Nothing.

After reading some more about APFS, I can't help but wonder if something somewhere is getting the "Preboot" location confused or something of that nature. Manually setting the bless file (which then just points back to the preboot location automatically) seemed to get it going the last time, but I don't know why as it seemed to point to the same place before/after, BUT the "bless --info" option (used in recovery mode mind you) said something about the XML file boot location and the blessed one didn't match the "TRUE" location. WTF!? I don't know what that means, but it sure sounded like something in there wasn't agreeing with something else on what to boot and maybe those locked up boot loops were pointing at the wrong thing and causing it to try to reboot (which didn't work for some reason and ends up in that message just flying up the screen like a print/goto loop).

Whatever is causing it, it's pretty darn irritating. I'm seriously thinking of reformatting/partitioning and restoring El Capitan from external backup. There's always a chance it has something to do with this SSD drive and it was just a coincidence that it happened when it did (turning on TRIM). I could try turning TRIM back off again, I suppose, but then write speeds would steadily drop (and Windows 10 has TRIM on and it works 100% fine with the same drive on its partition and once OS X *DOES* boot, it works fine until I reboot (no signs of errors in disk utility or anything and full write speeds, etc.) But I suppose I'd try that before restoring El Capitan. I could, of course just abandon OS X and go to Windows 10 full time (not much on OS X that isn't available in Windows 10 save Subler and Logic Pro, the latter of which I only use on my Macbook Pro). My Mini is mostly a whole house server for KODI and for email/web browsing (occasional older games that are available in Windows under Steam anyway).

I keep trying to find someone that has a clue about these sorts of things as those errors only show up in Google on Hackintosh sites for some reason. But so far, NO responses in other threads (one on mojave installs, one I made myself and somehow I doubt I'll get a response here either). Mac users don't seem to be very knowledgeable about the inner workings of OS X (I suspect the Hackintosh guys ARE super knowledgeable, but I don't know they'd want to take a shot at a real Mac. It might be worth asking them on a Hackintosh forum).
Rating: 1 Votes
25 weeks ago

I used to use Boot Camp quite frequently, but I haven't even set it up on my last couple of Macs. For what I need Windows for, something like Parallels, VirtualBox, or even Crossover works fine and is much more convenient.

I'd be curious to know what people use Boot Camp for nowadays. I would expect hardcore gamers to have actual (physical) Windows boxes, given that Macs aren't exactly graphics powerhouses.

Sometimes there’s just that one or two Windows software that is not available on the Mac that requires non virtualized environment. Or sometimes people are in a work environment where the IT simply doesn’t support Macs/virtualized OS. And those who need Windows but don’t want to pay extra or be bothered with virtualization.
Rating: 1 Votes
25 weeks ago

('https://www.macrumors.com/2019/06/13/apple-releases-macos-10-14-5-boot-camp-update/')



Apple today released a new macOS Mojave 10.14.5 Boot camp update, which is designed to address a bug that prevented the creation of a new Boot Camp partition on a iMac or Mac mini with a Fusion Drive.

The new software can be downloaded ('https://support.apple.com/kb/DL2007?locale=en_US') from Apple's support document accompanying the update.

The software update is available for iMac and Mac mini users, and won't be available to those who have other Mac machines.

Boot Camp is designed to allow Mac users to set up a partition to run Windows, providing access to PC-only apps and content.

Apple's Boot Camp update for macOS 10.14.5 comes about a month after the release of the macOS Mojave 10.14.5 update ('https://www.macrumors.com/2019/05/13/apple-releases-macos-mojave-10-14-5/').

Article Link: Apple Releases macOS Mojave 10.14.5 Boot Camp Update to Address iMac and Mac Mini Bug ('https://www.macrumors.com/2019/06/13/apple-releases-macos-10-14-5-boot-camp-update/')


I have a 2012 iMac 13,2 with a 3TB Fusion Drive. When I updated to macOS Mojave, I loss my Windows Partition. I was hoping this update would address this issue but after installing the file I still can not install Boot Camp. I was wondering if anyone had any luck after this update.
Rating: 1 Votes

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