CES 2019: Withings Unveils 3-in-1 Cardiovascular Monitor and Analog Smartwatch With ECG Feature

French consumer electronics company Withings has announced a trio of new wearable products at CES, including a three-in-one health monitor and two smartwatches, one with electrocardiogram (ECG) capability.


The health monitor is an upper arm cuff called the BPM Core that can take blood pressure, valvular health, and ECG readings, the latter of which can identify atrial fibrillation or irregular heartbeat in users.

The cuff inflates to take the blood pressure readings and heart-rate measurements, and displays them on the built-in LED matrix display, which includes instant traffic-light feedback showing normal, moderate, and high blood pressure readings.

To use the ECG function, the wearer has to place the hand of their other arm on the stainless steel sensor for 20 seconds, while the digital stethoscope involves placing a sensor on the user's chest for 20 seconds. In-depth results are sent wirelessly to the Withings Health Mate app.

Withings says its BPM Core is currently awaiting FDA clearance but that the cuff should go on sale for $249 in the second quarter of this year.


The company's two new analog-face fitness trackers come under the Move moniker and both track activity and sleep, with the Move ECG also able to take electrocardiogram readings when users touch both sides of the bezel.

The watches can recognize activities including running, walking, and swimming, feature water resistance up to 50 meters and up to 12 months of battery life.

The Move will initially be available in five color options priced at $70, with pre-orders now open and shipping expected to begin on February 5. The Move ECG comes in white and black, costing $130, and will be available in the second quarter of 2019. See the Withings website for more information.




Top Rated Comments

(View all)
Avatar
2 weeks ago
I like the direction this is taking. Maybe this is the solution towards a society where less and less heart attacks, strokes and other cardiovascular conditions go undetected until it's too late.
Rating: 1 Votes
[ Read All Comments ]