macOS 10.14 Mojave Drops Support for Many Older Machines

Apple this morning introduced macOS 10.14 Mojave, the newest version of the operating system designed to run on the Mac.

macOS Mojave is a major update that introduces a range of new features like a Dark Mode, Desktop and Finder improvements, new apps, and a revamped Mac App Store, but unfortunately, the update drops support for a number of machines.


While macOS High Sierra was available for some machines manufactured as early as 2009, macOS Mojave is largely limited to 2012 or newer machines, with the exception of some Mac Pro models. Here's a full list:
  • MacBook (Early 2015 or newer)
  • MacBook Air (Mid 2012 or newer)
  • MacBook Pro (Mid 2012 or newer)
  • Mac mini (Late 2012 or newer)
  • iMac (Late 2012 or newer)
  • iMac Pro (2017)
  • Mac Pro (Late 2013, plus mid 2010 and mid 2012 models with recommended Metal-capable GPU)
As you can see, compared to High Sierra, the update drops support for the older plastic MacBooks, and MacBook Pro, Air, mini, and iMac models from 2009, 2010, and 2011.

These older machines will not have access to the macOS Mojave features, and will continue to run macOS High Sierra.

Developers can download macOS Mojave starting today, and the update should be available for public beta testers later this summer.

Related Roundup: macOS Mojave


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7 months ago
This may be the last update that supports the 2012 Mini then. If they are indeed going to keep the Mini as part of the lineup, then they need to get off their ass and replace it with something other than the neutered 2014 Mini.
Rating: 36 Votes
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7 months ago
Now just give us a new Mac to use it on
Rating: 28 Votes
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7 months ago

Really? That’s common with tech products and consumer goods is it?

Windows 10 requirements:

These look like the specs of an average 2004 computer.

Rating: 24 Votes
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7 months ago
Dropping support for seven year old macs? Outrage!
Rating: 23 Votes
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7 months ago

Dropping support for seven year old macs? Outrage!

I know, right? :p

This wouldn't be nearly as big an issue if Apple actually made computers that were still upgradable. The post-2012 Apple has everything soldered, screwed and secured with nary an upgrade possible unless you want to void your warranty. My trust ol' 2010 MBP has allowed me to upgrade the RAM and HD twice over in the 8 years I've had it. (Plus the optical drive and full set of ports which continue to come in handy.)

I love the Apple ecosystem, but I've got some decisions to make in the next few years. Do I switch to Linux? Do I buy one of Apple's current offerings? Do I switch to Windows?

The ironic thing is, if Apple had continued to make laptops with standard ports and perhaps even optical drives, I would have bought a new one three years ago. I'm holding on to my 2010 model because it's one of the last that aligns with my computing philosophy.
Rating: 21 Votes
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7 months ago
My classic mid 2012 mbp lives on lol
Rating: 17 Votes
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7 months ago
Ah well... My 2011 MBP is officially old now and this makes me reconsider buying a Windows machine to replace it instead of a new Mac... If that's not planned obsolescence I don't know what it is. Longevity is one of the big advantages of owning a Mac but sadly it seems that they'd rather have a dark mode and a bunch of users forced to upgrade -> $$$.
Rating: 16 Votes
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7 months ago
It’s fair to end suppport for my 8 year old Air. But why the hell not provide a fair replacement device?

I surely won’t spend more than a 1000€ for a 10 year old design a second time again. Also, the current MacBook with a 480p(!) FT camera and the butterfly keyboard are a rather ridiculous option if you consider the price point. For me the Back to the Mac campaign was a promise that Tim Cook actually never delivered.
Rating: 15 Votes
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7 months ago
It's too bad that my mid-2010 iMac—which still runs as well as the day I got it—will not be able to run Mojave. Fair, though; the thing is nearly eight years old.

For those whose devices will not run Mojave: do not fret; this is not the "end of the road" for your computers! Indeed, so long as Apple continues to support High Sierra (likely for two more years) your device ought not to be considered obsolete.

EDIT: and yes, while my iMac was indeed ~$2,500 back in 2010, the reality is that I have had no problems with it in eight years. Absolutely none. That to me is worth the Apple price premium. I'll gladly buy another iMac a couple years down the line.
Rating: 13 Votes
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7 months ago

This is sure to make some mad.


And if Apple "supported" their older machines, they would lodge class action suits against Apple, claiming that Apple crippled the performance of their machines after the Mojave update.

Or they would complain that Apple keeps pestering them to an Update that (bazillion of others) have claimed slowed down their older Macs.
Rating: 12 Votes
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