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Unprotected T-Mobile API Let Anyone Get Customer Data With Just a Phone Number

A security vulnerability in T-Mobile's website let anyone gain access to the personal details of any T-Mobile customer using just a phone number, reports ZDNet.

An internal T-Mobile employee tool, promotool.t-mobile.com, had a hidden API that provided T-Mobile customer data when a customer's cell phone number was added to the end of the web address. Data that was available included full name, address, billing account number, and for some customers, tax identification numbers.


Account data, such as service status and billing status was also included, but it does not appear that credit card numbers, passwords, or other sensitive information was compromised. ZDNet says that there were "references to account PINs used by customers as a security question" which could be used to hijack T-Mobile accounts.

The API was used by T-Mobile staff to look up customer data, but it was accessible to the public and not protected by a password. T-Mobile rectified the issue in early April after it was disclosed by security researcher Ryan Stevenson, who ultimately earned $1,000.

In a statement provided to ZDNet, T-Mobile says that it does not appear customer data was accessed using the API, but research suggests the API had been exposed since at least October 2017.
A T-Mobile spokesperson said: "The bug bounty program exists so that researchers can alert us to vulnerabilities, which is what happened here, and we support this type of responsible and coordinated disclosure." "The bug was patched as soon as possible and we have no evidence that any customer information was accessed," the spokesperson added.
This is not the first unprotected API issue that T-Mobile has faced. Last year, a similar bug also exposed customer data to hackers.

T-Mobile has more than 74 million customers, and had this most recent bug been exploited, a simple script could have provided hackers with access to data on millions of people.



Top Rated Comments

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22 weeks ago
Pro tip from someone that works in Information Assurance, and has been involved in cleaning up several companies’ similar messes: anytime you see “we have no evidence that any customer information was accessed”, you can assume that they have zero logging. They ‘have no evidence’ because they have no logs; they aren’t saying it didn’t happen, it’s just a nice way to make it seem like nothing bad happened. Ask for evidence proving nothing bad happened, and you’ll be met with a horrified stare.
Rating: 19 Votes
22 weeks ago
Makes me think back to this conversation with TMobile on Twitter about the passwords being stored in plaintext (though it was TMO Austria).

https://twitter.com/tmobileat/status/981418339653300224

“Our security is amazingly good” LOL



Rating: 16 Votes
22 weeks ago
Until we start punishing these stupid mistakes with penalties that actually hurt, this is just going to happen over and over...
Rating: 15 Votes
22 weeks ago
Only $1000 for a catastrophic possible breach discovery? That's like getting paid $45 in a contest that was used as the Mets logo.
Rating: 9 Votes
22 weeks ago
Damn. Glad I switched to AT&T recently
Rating: 2 Votes
22 weeks ago

Makes me think back to this conversation with TMobile on Twitter about the passwords being stored in plaintext (though it was TMO Austria).

https://twitter.com/tmobileat/status/981418339653300224

“Our security is amazingly good” LOL


LOL never let a glorified marketing drone talk technology. They can only embarrass their company and expose it to malpractice suits.
Rating: 2 Votes
22 weeks ago
#uncarrier #unsafe #uncool
Rating: 2 Votes
22 weeks ago

#uncarrier #unsafe #uncool


Doesn't that apply to most big providers in the USA.:rolleyes:
The other big ones have their own "issues".
Rating: 2 Votes
22 weeks ago
Cheap carrier, cheap bounties
Rating: 1 Votes
22 weeks ago

Man, Australia has a much different approach to customer service than the rest of the world lol

Austria?
Rating: 1 Votes

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