iPhone 7 Hands-On: Improved Cameras, New Jet Black Color, AirPods, No Headphone Jack, and More

Immediately following its media event today in San Francisco, Apple invited members of the press to a special hands-on area to get a closer look at the iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus. The first real-life photos and videos of the smartphones are now beginning to surface around the web, showcasing the improved cameras, new black colors, no headphone jack, and more.

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The Verge shared pictures of the iPhone 7 in both the new Black and Jet Black colors, providing a glimpse of the new matte and glossy finishes in action. The two new colors complement the existing options of Gold, Silver, and Rose Gold. Jet Black in particular will be limited to 128GB and 256GB models of the iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus, while the other four colors will be available for all storage capacities.

In the article, the website described the iPhone 7's capacitive home button as "awful," adding that "it doesn't feel like a button at all."
Another thing I tried: the new home button, which uses a "taptic engine" to give you physical feedback when you press it — it's pressure sensitive too, so it can tell if you really mean to press it or just tap it. And it's awful. On a MacBook trackpad, you get this uncanny feeling that you're actually hitting a button. On the iPhone, the whole bottom of the phone just sort of "kicks." It's not bad haptics like you remember, with weird vibration, it's just a new kind of bad haptics. It doesn't feel like a button at all. It's a bummer.
CNET prepared a quick hands-on video with the iPhone 7 Plus in Rose Gold, showing off its dual cameras, no headphone jack, stereo speakers, repositioned antenna bands, and capacitive, force-sensitive home button.


SlashGear, meanwhile, provided a hands-on look at Apple's new wireless AirPods with charging case and Lightning to 3.5mm headphone jack adapter. AirPods will be available for $159 in late October, while the Lightning to 3.5mm headphone jack adapter is included in the box with iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus. The adapter is $9 as a standalone purchase on Apple's online store and retail locations.

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More hands-on videos and first impressions should follow in the coming hours and days.

Related Roundup: AirPods 2
Buyer's Guide: AirPods (Buy Now)

Top Rated Comments

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42 months ago

those airpods look ridiculous.


Seriously - it looks like someone just chopped the wires off regular earbuds.
Rating: 54 Votes
42 months ago
those airpods look ridiculous.

Apple didn't offer a compelling reason to leave the wired headphones. Courage is not a reason.

There is no new bluetooth high fidelity audio nor is there an apple signature high quality audio experience to be had. This is a sham for consumers.
Rating: 52 Votes
42 months ago
Everyone complains about wires and then when you take them away everyone complains about the lack of wires. Weird.

I say bring on the new generation of wireless audio. Those EarPods are just the first generation, just imagine where we'll be in 5 years and there on.

Certainly it won't be the same place as we'd be if we'd carried on using wired headphones, which is pretty much exactly the same place as it was both now, and 40 years ago.

Phil was right, dumping old habits does take courage, and it pays off.



Sent from my Newton ;)
Rating: 42 Votes
42 months ago
Why not USB-C? Why the disconnect between macbook and iOS products? Can't seamlessly switch headphones or chargers between their own products. Sigh!
Rating: 35 Votes
42 months ago
The Airpods look lame when worn. Ok in the box.
Rating: 25 Votes
42 months ago

Hmm - from The Verge piece:

Another thing I tried: the new home button, which uses a "taptic engine" to give you physical feedback when you press it — it's pressure sensitive too, so it can tell if you really mean to press it or just tap it. And it's awful. On a MacBook trackpad, you get this uncanny feeling that you're actually hitting a button. On the iPhone, the whole bottom of the phone just sort of "kicks." It's not bad haptics like you remember, with weird vibration, it's just a new kind of bad haptics. It doesn't feel like a button at all. It's a bummer.

he contradicts himself completely in his video
[MEDIA=youtube]65aUaWS7psQ[/MEDIA]
Rating: 24 Votes
42 months ago

I'm convinced Ive has all but retired and is just sticking around to entertain himself by trolling people with these ridiculous designs.


Ever since the "unapologetically plastic" 5c, the Ive product-design videos just sound like parodies of Ive videos.
He's become his own caricature.
Rating: 22 Votes
42 months ago
iPhone 2017 will come with ceramic body. Piano black and edge to edge. OLED display, wireless charge.

You heard it here first
Rating: 22 Votes
42 months ago
Usually when you have to hook up special adapters for existing equipment it's considered a downgrade.
Rating: 21 Votes
42 months ago
Hmm - from The Verge piece:

Another thing I tried: the new home button, which uses a "taptic engine" to give you physical feedback when you press it — it's pressure sensitive too, so it can tell if you really mean to press it or just tap it. And it's awful. On a MacBook trackpad, you get this uncanny feeling that you're actually hitting a button. On the iPhone, the whole bottom of the phone just sort of "kicks." It's not bad haptics like you remember, with weird vibration, it's just a new kind of bad haptics. It doesn't feel like a button at all. It's a bummer.
Rating: 18 Votes

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