California Judge Dismisses Notebook Logic Board Lawsuit Against Apple

U.S. District Judge William Alsup this week dismissed a lawsuit filed against Apple over allegedly defective Apple notebooks, reports Reuters. Filed on behalf of Uriel Marcus and Benedict Verceles with class action status, the suit accused Apple of deliberately selling notebooks with logic boards the company knew were faulty.

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The plaintiffs claim Apple in May 2010 stated selling defective MacBook, MacBook Pro, and MacBook Air notebooks with logic boards that failed within two years. Apple was accused of misrepresenting the faulty notebooks by advertising them as "state of the art" and the "most advanced" notebooks on the market. According to the suit, Tim Cook allegedly was made aware of the logic board issue in 2011 but did nothing to remedy the issue.

In his dismissal of the suit, Alsup said the plaintiffs failed to show that Apple's notebooks were of a substandard quality, noting that both plaintiffs were able to use their computers for a reasonable amount of time.
"Plaintiffs have failed to allege that Apple's logic boards were unfit for their ordinary purposes or lacked a minimal level of quality," Alsup wrote. "Both plaintiffs were able to adequately use their computers for approximately 18 months and two years, respectively."
Alsup also refuted the plaintiffs' claim that Apple misrepresented its products. Following this dismissal, the plaintiffs have until January 22 to amend their lawsuit.

Apple is facing another MacBook-related lawsuit that accuses the company of selling MacBook Pro models with defective graphics cards. This second suit is the result of a growing number of consumer complaints citing screen glitches, GPU failures, and system crashes in Apple's 2011 line of MacBook Pro notebooks.

Related Roundup: MacBook Air


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50 months ago
Admittedly the 1 year warranties are a bit scummy. If Apple product quality is supposed to be the best why aren't Macs coming with 3 year warranties like high end products from other companies do.
Rating: 21 Votes
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50 months ago
Considering the average computer has a life span of 5 years, and the average Mac is nearly double that, the 18 month statement is highly ignorant.
Rating: 14 Votes
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50 months ago
Sorry, but when you pay $1,799 and up for a notebook, I want to use it more an 2.5 years. :mad:

Still, like others said, I got a 15" rMBP replacement so...
Rating: 10 Votes
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50 months ago

Both plaintiffs were able to adequately use their computers for approximately 18 months and two years, respectively.

Can't make that up. :eek:
I wouldn't want to add that into the next ad-campaign, though. :p
Rating: 7 Votes
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50 months ago
"Failed to allege"?? Failed to prove, surely?

We've had to replace several 2010 & 2011 MBPs in recent months, all failing with graphics cards issues. It's a real pity, as otherwise they were still running great - fast, no fan issues, no battery issues. By comparison we had several 1st gen Intel MBPs and those were dreadful, random shutdowns, failing power adaptors, bulging batteries, melting cables, fans failing... On the plus side, I got a 2013 Retina MBP with SSD so no complaints.
Rating: 6 Votes
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50 months ago
Saying it's reasonable for a fairly expensive notebook like a MacBook (Pro) to fail after just two years is laughable.
Rating: 5 Votes
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50 months ago

the 18 month statement is highly ignorant.

Well, technically, it's beyond the 12-month warranty, and that's all that matters in terms of the lawsuit.
Rating: 5 Votes
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50 months ago

Considering the average computer has a life span of 5 years, and the average Mac is nearly double that, the 18 month statement is highly ignorant.


If the judge listened to you, then any given warranty term would have no value.
I could say 5 year on my water heater, and in the 6th year you sue me because it broke because 'everyone elses' lasted 6 years or more..

waaa..

both are reasonably past warranty. Thats why you pay for extended warranties if you want them. Choose to no get that extension and well you roll the dice, to accept the consequences..

Well, in a reasonable world.. these days we don't like it, even though you accepted the terms by purchasing it, we just sue and stamp our fee like adolescent spoiled brats.
Rating: 4 Votes
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50 months ago
Regardless, if a computer comes with a ridiculous 1 year warranty, that means the manufacturer does not trust that the computer will likely still function after one year. Otherwise surely they would try to gain your trust by guaranteeing (in many languages, the word "warranty" is the same as "to guarantee") its useful life with a warranty...

Add to that the fact that most modern electronic devices have almost no moving parts, and that they require no maintenance and that other than dropping them or submerging them in water (which have telltale signs), there is nothing a user can do to cause the machine to fail, so almost all faults are the manufacturer's fault and are a matter of bad luck to the user.

Add to that that anything you buy today will come with at the very minimum 2, but more commonly 3 years of warranty, be it a hairdryer, a memory card, a cheap mouse, a hard drive, a car (though most cars come with at least 3-4 years of warranty, with companies like Kia offering 7 years), or any computer not made by Apple (even cheap, unbranded ones).

If Apple makes a computer that is supposed to have a useful life of 3 years (that better be the case given the price and the upgrade cycle), then they should reflect that intention with a guarantee.

You can't spend money based on the HOPE that you will be lucky and that your machine will probably continue to work after 1 year.

There's no other good or service that I can think of that doesn't guarantee some sort of reasonable useful life for the thing you're paying money for.

A warranty means: You don't just buy a product and hope for the best, but rather you have a company's promise and guarantee that the product will have a useful life of a number of years. This means that manufacturers cannot just clunk together a machine from cheap parts that fail within a year, since a user cannot know how long the machine will last at the time of purchase. You can check if it works when you buy it, but you can't check if it will still work in 2 or 3 years because you don't have a time machine. But when the time comes, if you're out of warranty, it's too late to regret the purchase. That's why a warranty is important. 1 year is useless for a product that NO ONE intends to replace on a yearly basis.
Rating: 4 Votes
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50 months ago
I've never had a problem with Apple fixing an out-of-warranty Apple product for free, even when it was my fault.

I find it a bit crazy that the judge is calling 18-24 months of usage reasonable. Yes, it's beyond the warranty, but few people go through computers that quickly.
Rating: 4 Votes
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