New in OS X: Get MacRumors Push Notifications on your Mac

Resubscribe Now Close

Tim Cook to Headline D10 Conference on May 29


AllThingsD today announced that Apple CEO Tim Cook will be the opening keynote speaker at the D10 Conference scheduled for late May. Cook will appear in an evening interview session on Tuesday, May 29 in Rancho Palos Verdes, California.
Walt Mossberg and I could not be more thrilled to announce that Tim Cook, CEO of Apple, will be the opening-night speaker at our 10th D: All Things Digital conference.

It will be Cook’s first appearance at D, as well as his first time being onstage at an event not run by Apple or for investors since he was named CEO last August.
Steve Jobs made a number of appearances at the D conferences, including a notable joint appearance with Bill Gates at D5 in 2007 and his final appearance there at D8 in 2010.

Top Rated Comments

(View all)

98 months ago

iPhone 5?


Apple doesn't announce products at these conferences.
Rating: 11 Votes
98 months ago
Hope it will be as exciting as Steve's speaches. Tim is great. :)
Rating: 6 Votes
98 months ago

I'd like to see Apple shift its focus back on making computers. Enough with this iOS/iToy crap, theres still a lot of old school mac users that do actual work on them.


The iOS/iToy crap is where Apple makes most of it's profits so I don't think you'll see a shift in focus.
Rating: 5 Votes
98 months ago
Might not be "showing off"

Good comment, but I have to rate you down. Sorry, but look at my signature


I've seen your posts (and sig) on MR a number of times. I always thought, "That's kind of a funny position to take..." But, of course, I had no way of knowing whether you're actually downvoting... or if you were just being funny.

Well, after you're finished downvoting me (for my sig contents), I wonder if you'll consider the fact that some folks put their devices in their sig for other reasons that are actually usefuly in these forums. I'm sure there are many such reasons. For me, it harkens back to the days of using Apple's own Discussion Boards, where you are encouraged to post the details of your "setup" to provide context when posting technical problems, etc.

I think lots of people that post on these more "commentary" threads may also be posting to technical threads... trying to help people solve problems... or even asking questions of their own. By sharing which machines they have, it can actually help to elucidate issues or problems.

I realize I'm probably wasting my breath here... but I just wanted to throw it out... and see if you're capable of understanding that people aren't necessarily "braggging" about their treasure trove of devices.

And, finally, if you're going to downrate, just DO IT. You don't have to post to the world that you did it. Geesh!
Rating: 5 Votes
98 months ago
Gates and Jobs are influential people. Let's see how Tim Cook will fair. He does have a monumental publicity burden on his shoulders. So far, he seems to be doing quite well. What I respect is that he doesn't try to copy Steve Jobs's style.
Rating: 4 Votes
98 months ago

Yet it is because of their marketing on iDevices that spurred this recent surge. Remember the days when Apple commercials had the likes of Jeff Goldblum selling Mac's?

[shortened for brevity in comment response]

My point, Apple created a device then marketed it aggressively while ignoring the OS X based power systems. The lack of desktop systems in Apple's market isn't due to user needs changing but Apple's push back in 2007 to iDevices, creating a need where none existed and created a segment for the company while ignoring what once made Apple a powerhouse with professionals.

Yet, there are many who need a power system with larger screen real estate. Try HD rendering on a iPad, or actual photo editing that iPhoto for iPad's is incapable of doing. ARM processors on iDevices cannot replace the need for power systems. Consumers can toy around with iPhoto, which is quite good for average needs. The drop of a decent Final Cut revamp with the failed X release, and as my friend who works as a design consult for engineers has attested, the Pro Apps department is sadly lacking in serious engineers and funding. Steve Jobs has even stated after the acquisition of Shake that the input from creatives/professionals will no longer be needed at Apple. That's telling in itself.


Some excellent points sir. :)
Rating: 4 Votes
98 months ago
So long as that vile women interviewer doesnt ask any more stupid questions.... Ill be watching old cookie. I want to see how he reacts to questions about his leadership. Never got into his head as much on the subject.
Rating: 4 Votes
98 months ago

Apple makes some of the best selling computers on the planet, what in the world more could they do for you?


I believe he, and many others, specifically mean power systems such as the Mac Pro. Since Apple switched to Intel processors, the once affordable PowerMac's went from ~$1500 - $2400+. Professionals used to be able to afford a PowerMac G4/5 AND an Apple 20"/23"/30" CCFL LCD for about the same price as a current Mac Pro. Apple has neglected this particular segment and not for the lack of demand, many have voiced their needs for a mid-tower Mac, something between a top level iMac and a base Mac Pro. Upgradability is a major concern as many can switch out graphics cards, PCIe/eSATA cards, etc while retaining their own displays. These systems last longer as iMac's have only the ability for RAM upgrades (as an ex-Apple Genius, accessing system components behind the glass/LED LCD panel is a pain and the graphics are not replaceable).

While Apple has strong sales with notebooks and iMac's, the prosumer market is in desperate need for Apple to refocus on professional systems. Many have switched to Windows based systems with the advent of Avid and Adobe's Premiere Pro being excellent alternatives to the disappointing Final Cut Pro X release. There is money to be made, Apple simply doesn't care. :)

(read my comment, #27, if you're interested in more :) )
Rating: 3 Votes
98 months ago

Whoa, you need to calm down. I never said Mac Pro's, please reread my comments, I stated a mid-tower and my comments regarding past focus were just that, past. This isn't personal, let's leave insults and condescension out of the discussion and keep it civil, please. I'm not stupid, and I don't appreciate being insulted.


^What he said. For real, getting worked up over this is what is "stupid".
Rating: 3 Votes
98 months ago

Do you honestly think advertizing a Mac Pro would make a whit a difference in Apple's bottom line? It's not where the money is at, nor is it where the market is at.

Apple is selling more Macs now because of all the buzz surrounding the iPad and iPhone. The better Apple can market iOS devices the better the Mac sales are getting. It's called the halo effect. Google it, it's what is moving Mac share upward, while the PC share is sinking.

The olden days are over. No one is calling for their spouse to come see the specs on TV for a newer faster Mac Pro.


Before iPhones and iPads, Apple actually did advertise PowerMac's and PowerBooks, and they made money! With Jobs on board, Apple retooled their desktop line which was their bread and butter, followed by PowerBooks. That money went to funding R&D for the iPad, which came about in 2004. Apple decided, based on Steve Jobs' vision for the company, to release it as a mobile phone and slowly market it. Smart phones were once used mostly by the enterprise market, then Apple targeted consumers with a simple, easy to use smart phone. This lead the path to the iPad as Apple already established a market and demand. The demand wasn't there, consumers weren't (generally speaking) clamoring for smart phones. Yet Apple made smart phones a common consumer product. Was this inevitable with portable electronics? Who knows, yet it wasn't in 2006/7. Recall that Apple delayed OS X 10.5 Leopard as it shifted engineers to iOS/iPhone development.

Mac Pro's are expensive, and aren't for the general consumer while PowerMac's were a good alternative to consumers who needed more flexibility than iMac's (gamers, film editors, photographers) and didn't cannibalize on iMac sales. However, if they released a system between an iMac and a Mac Pro for ~$1500-~2K as PowerMac's once cost, I guarantee you businesses that have $100k+ for upgrades would be on board. The numbers might not exist, but the money businesses spend more than makes up for that fact. Trust me, I work in communications and used to recommend Mac's, but after dropping focus on professional hardware and software many have switched to Windows systems (desktops in that market haven't slumped as much as Apple's only tower, the Mac Pro).

Quote:

Yet it is because of their marketing on iDevices that spurred this recent surge. Remember the days when Apple commercials had the likes of Jeff Goldblum selling Mac's?

//www.youtube.com/watch?v=jzj7STruKgQ

I have yet to see one commercial selling MacBook Pro's or iMac's (and none for Mac Pro's, PowerMac's were advertised). Remember this iMac ad:

Apple iMac Commercial - "Un-PC"

And this one which isn't even that old (and quite funny)
Apple iMac Commercial - G4 iMac Window Commercial

So in a way, Apple CREATED a need for the iPhone, then slowly released such related aspects as the iOS App store, tested the waters with the iPhone as the iPad was developed first in 2004 as a phone would be more appealing to the consumer market than a simple tablet. Once Apple grounded its market with the iPhone, prepping a commercial release for the iPad, iOS and iDevices became their focus. In this sense, Apple CHOSE to focus on a different product, created a need for that product through marketing hype and subtlety (yet aggressively) pushing the smart phone into the hands of everyday users (Soccer mom's, fashionista's, even teenagers!). Then Apple hooked them into MacBook's. Done.

Now if Apple takes some of those $90 billion in cash and did the same with their Mac Pro's by creating a mid-tower system that is affordable and upgradable and allow owners to use their own displays I can guarantee you Apple's refocus in power systems would generate a profitable marketshare for the company as it did for smart phones and tablets. Apple's lack of marketing and focus in power users is why it's not making as much money as less expensive iDevices that also appeal to Windows users. There IS a demand for such desktop products, for those who don't want an iMac and need an upgradable mid-tower with their own displays (EIZO being a popular display for the creative industry that once only used Mac's). Many businesses have a lot of cash on hand to upgrade their systems, software and are holding back due to Apple's lack of focus they once had for power systems.

My point, Apple created a device then marketed it aggressively while ignoring the OS X based power systems. The lack of desktop systems in Apple's market isn't due to user needs changing but Apple's push back in 2007 to iDevices, creating a need where none existed and created a segment for the company while ignoring what once made Apple a powerhouse with professionals.


By "none existed" I mean consumers weren't demanding a smart phone, especially as at the time they were generally unintuitive for the non-techie consumer. The iPhone was a game changer, as it made smart devices easier for the average user and marketed it after their trendy iPod line. If you examine Apple's roadmap, the iPod, iPhone and iPod Touch, iPad all enveloped/attached to the iTunes ecosystem, it would then be inevitable that notebooks and iMacs would be popular for general users. Apple lead a trend, created a demand for a product through great marketing, and the rest is now unfolding.

When was the last time you saw an iMac or Mac Pro ad (keep in mind, Apple had ads for PowerMac's)?
Rating: 3 Votes

[ Read All Comments ]