VESA


'VESA' Articles

DisplayPort 2.0 Supports Up to Two 8K Displays or One 16K Display, Rollout Expected to Begin in Late 2020

VESA today announced the release of DisplayPort 2.0, the first major update to the standard since DisplayPort 1.4 in March 2016. DisplayPort 2.0 has a max effective bandwidth of 77.4 Gbps, nearly triple that of DisplayPort 1.4, enabling support for displays with up to 16K resolution, higher refresh rates, HDR support at higher resolutions, improved support for multiple display configurations, and more. The increased bandwidth is the result of VESA leveraging Thunderbolt 3's physical layer. DisplayPort 2.0 is the first standard to support 8K resolution at a 60Hz refresh rate with full-color 4:4:4 resolution and HDR-10 support. DisplayPort 2.0 configuration examples via DisplayPort, USB-C, or Thunderbolt 3 ports, which will all support the new specification:Single display resolutions - One 16K (15360x8460) display @60Hz and 30 bpp 4:4:4 HDR (with DSC) - One 10K (10240x4320) display @60Hz and 24 bpp 4:4:4 (no compression) Dual display resolutions - Two 8K (7680x4320) displays @120Hz and 30 bpp 4:4:4 HDR (with DSC) - Two 4K (3840x2160) displays @144Hz and 24 bpp 4:4:4 (no compression) Triple display resolutions - Three 10K (10240x4320) displays @60Hz and 30 bpp 4:4:4 HDR (with DSC) - Three 4K (3840x2160) displays @90Hz and 30 bpp 4:4:4 HDR (no compression)DisplayPort 2.0 also supports VESA's new Panel Replay capability for improved power efficiency when connecting to high-resolution displays. VESA has made the DisplayPort 2.0 specification available to manufacturers and expects the first products incorporating the standard to appear on the market

Video Suggests Screws in iMac Pro's VESA Mounting Kit Are Prone to Break When Unfastened

Quinn Nelson, host of the popular YouTube channel Snazzy Labs, has shared a new video that appears to suggest the iMac Pro's user-installable VESA mounting kit uses cheap screws that are prone to break when unfastened. For background, the kit enables users to replace an iMac Pro's stand with a VESA mount adapter, allowing the computer to be affixed to any VESA-compatible wall mount, desk mount, or articulating arm. Jason Snell of Six Colors provides a good overview of the installation process in the video below. Nelson installed the adapter without issue, but ran into difficulties when he went to remove it a few months later:When I was backing out one of the five screws, which was not overtightened by the way, the screw head just broke clean off from the screw body, and it left the screw stuck inside of the screw hole threads. The end result… I couldn’t remove the VESA adapter… ever.Nelson acknowledges that the adapter is probably not designed to be taken on-and-off repeatedly, but Apple never warns against doing so, and switching back to the traditional stand at least once seems reasonable. Unable to remove the adapter, Nelson said he contacted Apple by phone, explained the situation, and was told that Apple could not provide support because the adapter is manufactured by a licensed OEM, despite being sold by Apple with Apple-branded packaging and documentation. The support representative then declined to provide the name of the OEM or their contact information, according to Nelson, who gave up on the phone call and decided to visit the Genius Bar at his

Apple Releases VESA-Compatible Mounting Bracket Kit for iMac Pro

With the iMac Pro now available to order, Apple has released a VESA mount adapter kit for the computer on its online store around the world. The kit comes with everything you need to replace your iMac Pro stand with a mounting bracket, which lets you attach your iMac Pro to any VESA-compatible wall mount, desk mount, or articulating arm to customize your workspace.With the VESA Mount Adapter attached, your iMac Pro complies with the VESA FDMI (MIS-D, 100, C) version specification. This adapter supports iMac Pro and cannot be used with any other iMac or display. Use the adapter only with a VESA mount that can support the weight of your iMac Pro.The kit is priced at $79 in the United States and is currently estimated to ship in 2-3 weeks, so deliveries should begin in January. While ordering the iMac Pro on Apple's online store, the kit can also be added for $79 as part of a custom

DisplayPort Standard with 8K Support for Notebooks and All-in-Ones Heading for Mid-2016 Launch

The Video Electronics Standards Association (VESA) yesterday announced that it has officially published the Embedded DisplayPort (eDP) Standard version 1.4b, which brings the previous 1.4a iteration into the final stages of production-ready status for future notebook and all-in-one desktop displays. This final revision of the eDP 1.4 standard includes a few "key protocol refinements and clarifications" to ensure ease-of-integration for partners supporting it and an overall lower bill of materials costs to its implementation. The eDP 1.4 standard was announced two years ago, with an improved eDP 1.4a standard arriving earlier this year setting the stage for future 8K support on notebooks and all-in-one desktop computers. The association promises that GPUs and CPUs that run the DisplayPort 1.3 standard for external display connectivity with 5K support will also be able to eDP 1.4b for internal uses. DisplayPort 1.3 support is, however, still only in the early stages, with Intel's latest Skylake chips not including it. According to Bill Lempesis, executive director at VESA, “Since its introduction in 2008, eDP has become a central system element within the mobile computing market space. The standard has continued to retain its lead in display performance, supporting embedded panels with resolutions as high as 8K. We look forward to seeing systems incorporating the finalized standard come to fruition next year, broadening the number of consumers receiving clear, crisp visual information delivered by eDP 1.4 on their laptops, tablets, all-in-one PCs and possibly even

New DisplayPort 1.4a Standard Points to 8K Notebook and All-in-One Desktop Displays in 2016

The Video Electronics Standard Association (VESA) yesterday announced a new Embedded DisplayPort Standard, version 1.4a, that the association claims "enables a higher video data transfer rate for increased panel resolution, greater color depth and higher refresh rates." Along with other upgrades, the new standard will be able to take advantage of more advanced GPU video performance and display technologies, meaning a wider range of computing devices - laptops and all-in-one PCs like the iMac in particular - will be able to produce 8K content sometime next year. The new standard is for "embedded" panels with the ability to produce up to 8K quality display images, meaning eDP 1.4a won't work with external displays. The current DisplayPort standard is 1.2a, with VESA having announced the next-generation 1.3 standard with 5K support last September. Full support of DisplayPort 1.3 will, however, need to wait until Intel releases its next-generation Skylake chips late this year or early next year. Apple's current 5K Retina iMac uses a custom solution to manage its 5120 x 2880 display, and 8K displays supported under the future 1.4a standard would come in at 7680 x 4320 pixels. These higher-resolution displays at 8K should result in a more power-hungry machine, but VESA claims its new Multi-SST Operation will support a Segmented Panel Display feature, bringing lighter, lower-cost display architecture to the new eDP standard. According to Vice President Bong-Hyun You of Samsung Display Co., Ltd., this new strategy can "reduce panel thickness, reduce power draw, and