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Developer Hacks Apple Watch to Run Game Boy Emulator

Developer Gabriel O'Flaherty-Chan recently shared a project where he managed to get a Game Boy emulator he dubbed "Giovanni" running on the second-generation Apple Watch, allowing it to play Game Boy and Game Boy Color games. According to O'Flaherty-Chan, it was a challenge finding the right balance "between framerate and performance," but he says the end result is a "surprisingly usable emulator." In GIFs shared in a blog post, the Apple Watch is displayed running Pokémon Yellow. The Giovanni emulator, named after the villain in Pokémon Yellow, was built using open source code from Gambatte, an existing iOS emulator. It uses the Digital Crown and gestures for control purposes. By allowing the user to pan on screen for directions, rotate the Digital Crown for up and down, and tap the screen for A, I was able to eliminate buttons until I was left with Select, Start, and B. Touching the screen for movement isn't a great interaction, but being able to use the Crown worked out a lot better than originally anticipated. Scrolling through a list of options is basically what the Crown was made for, and if the framerate was even slightly higher, the interaction could almost be better than a hardware D-pad.As Ars Technica points out, Giovanni is not something you should expect to see in the App Store -- it's more of a proof of concept than anything else. Apple does not allow emulators on the App Store, and O'Flaherty-Chan himself says it is afflicted with bugs due to the "constraints of watchOS," including the lack of support for OpenGL and Metal. The Giovanni

iOS Hacker Shows Web Browser Running on Apple Watch

iOS developer Nicholas Allegra, better known by his handle "comex" within the jailbreaking community, shared a short video on Twitter that shows a web browser running on the Apple Watch. The fifteen-second clip shows Allegra tapping, panning and zooming on the Google homepage on the Apple Watch, but the functionality is limited as to be expected because of the small screen size and lack of an on-screen keyboard. "I always wanted a web browser on my wrist," tweeted Allegra, who later shared another picture of the iOS built-in dictionary running on the Apple Watch. Allegra stopped short of providing details about the hack, but a web browser running on the Apple Watch is an interesting proof-of-concept and fuels the possibility of an Apple Watch jailbreak or native apps with web browsing capabilities in the future. Apple confirmed last November that fully native Apple Watch apps will be available later this year, but it remains unclear what restrictions Apple will place on them. Apple Watch apps are currently loaded from a paired iPhone via Bluetooth as WatchKit extensions, and developers do not have access to the Apple Watch's gyroscope, accelerometer, built-in speaker, microphone or Taptic Engine. Allegra was an active member of the jailbreaking community in the early years of iOS devices, while attending Brown University in Rhode Island. Under the pseudonym "comex," he revived JailbreakMe.com in early 2011 as a one-tap jailbreaking solution for compatible iPhone, iPad and iPod touch devices at the time. He later interned at Apple in 2011 and Google in 2013.