Files

Jump to How Tos Articles

'Files' How Tos

How to Zip and Unzip Files and Folders on iPhone and iPad

People compress electronic files for different reasons – to make them easier to transport electronically, to organize their backups, or to save device storage space, for example. In iOS 13 and later, Apple's native Files app supports the common ZIP compression format, which means you can now uncompress zipped files downloaded in Safari, or compress several files into one neat zipped package ready for sharing, right on your iOS device. Keep reading to learn how it works. How to Uncompress a Zip File on iPhone and iPad How to Compress a File or Folder on iPhone and iPad How to Compress Multiple Files in a Single Zip on iPhone and iPadHow to Uncompress a Zipped File on iPhone and iPad Launch the Files app on your iPhone or iPad. Find the zip file that you want to uncompress. Press and hold on the zip file, then select Uncompress from the contextual menu.The uncompressed files will be saved in the same location as the original zip file, which is now safe to delete. How to Compress a File or Folder on iPhone and iPad Launch the Files app on your iPhone or iPad. Find the file or folder that you want to compress. Press and hold on the file or folder, then select Compress from the contextual menu.The new compressed zip file containing your file/folder will be automatically saved in the same location as the originals. How to Compress Multiple Files in a Single Zip on iPhone and iPad Launch the Files app on your iPhone or iPad. Find the files and/or folders that you want to compress. Tap Select in the top-right corner of the screen, then tap on the

How to Scan Documents in the iOS Files App

Since iOS 11, Apple's stock Notes app has featured an impressive built-in tool for scanning documents and saving them as a note. In iOS 13, Apple has added a similar tool to the Files app that lets you scan documents and save them as PDFs in the location of your choosing. Once you've scanned a document, you can save it anywhere in iCloud Drive, or in any third-party cloud services that you've associated with the Files app. The following steps guide you through the process of scanning something and saving it in your preferred location. Launch the Files app on your iPhone or iPad. On the Browse screen, tap the ellipsis button (the circle containing three dots) at the top-right corner of the screen. Alternately, navigate to the folder in which you want to save your scans, then swipe down on the screen to reveal the folder options bar and tap the ellipsis button on the left. Select Scan Documents from the pop-up menu. By default, the camera will try to detect a document in the viewfinder and automatically capture it. If you don't want this to happen, tap Auto in the top-right corner of the camera interface to change to the Manual setting. Tap on the three circles at the top to choose color, grayscale, black and white, or photo for your scan. The default option is color. Tap on the flash icon if you need to adjust the flash options. The default is auto, which will cause the flash to go off if you're in a room with low light. Focus the camera on your document, making sure the yellow box is lined up with the edges of your document. When it's aligned, tap the camera

How to Use the New Files App in iOS 11

The new Files app in iOS 11 replaces iCloud Drive, offers a lot more functionality than its predecessor, and provides perhaps the best argument yet for using an iPad as your go-to mobile computer. In Files, you have access not only to the files stored on your device and in iCloud, but also to those stored in third-party services that support integration with the app. Files also exploits all of the new multitasking gestures in iOS 11, making its file organization capabilities even more powerful. The Files Interface The Files app interface is very straightforward, although it varies from device to device and based on orientation, with various combinations using multiple columns, single columns with pages, or pop-overs. For the purposes of this overview, we'll look at using an iPad in landscape orientation, the most common setup for those doing productivity work. Down the left side of the screen, in the Browse column, are links to your file sources, Favorites, and Tags to view files that are tagged with a particular color. Over in the main window you'll see the files and folders in the selected location, which you can view by name, date, size, or tags. There's a button on the right of these options that you can tap to switch between list and icon view, while the button on the left lets you create a new folder. At the bottom of the screen are two buttons to switch between the default Browse view and a Recents view, which is useful for returning to the files you were last working with. In either view, you can open a file in the main window simply by

'Files' Articles

Gmail for iOS Gaining Integration With Apple's Files App for Adding Attachments

Google is rolling out an update to its Gmail app for iOS devices so that users can upload attachments from Apple's native Files app. When the new feature becomes available, tap the paperclip icon when you're composing or replying to a message in the Gmail app. This will bring up a sheet with carousels for "Camera roll" and "Attachments" (formerly named "Recent attachments"). This new Attachments section will feature a special folder icon for directly accessing the contents of the Files app on your iPhone or iPad, including access to the native search and selection tools of the Files extension. As for the rollout timeline for the Files integration, Google says there will be an extended rollout which may take longer than two weeks for "feature visibility." Whether that means this is a server-side change or requires an updated version of the app is unclear. The Gmail app is a free download available on the App Store. [Direct Link]

Google Drive Updated to Play Friendly With Apple's Files App

Google Drive no longer hijacks file opening duties in Apple's Files and iCloud Drive apps on iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch. The app was updated today with a fix for the issue. Microsoft Word documents and other file types can now be viewed directly in in Apple's Files and iCloud Drive apps on iOS 11 and iOS 10 respectively. Since a previous update to Google Drive earlier this month, the app became the default opener for many file types due to an open-in-place issue. When users with the Google Drive app installed attempted to open a DOCX file in Files or iCloud Drive, for example, the Google Drive app would automatically open and prompt the user to save the file in that app. Google Drive version 4.2017.37510 is available on the App Store [Direct Link].

Fix Incoming for Google Drive Issue Preventing Many File Types From Opening in Apple's Files App [Updated]

Since the Google Drive app for iOS was updated earlier this month, several iPhone and iPad users have been unable to open Microsoft Word documents and many other file types in Apple's Files app for iOS 11 or iCloud Drive app for iOS 10. Instead, when users with the Google Drive app installed attempt to open a DOCX file in the Files or iCloud Drive apps, for example, the Google Drive app automatically opens and displays a prompt to save the file. MacRumors has been able to duplicate the issue, which is likely a Google Drive problem rather than a Files or iCloud Drive one. The only solution to the problem for now appears to be uninstalling the Google Drive app. Google has yet to comment on the matter, but it will presumably have to release another update to the Google Drive app to fix this issue. Update: The issue appears to be the result of Google registering for the "public.data" UTI and setting its handler rank to "owner." Then, the latest update to Google Drive seemingly added open-in-place support for "public.data," which is all data types, and became the default opener for many other file types. the default opener for every file format who’s owner does not support open in-place.— Ian McDowell (@ian_mcdowell) September 25, 2017 A source familiar with the matter informed MacRumors that Google is aware of the issue and working on a fix. Update 2: Google Drive has been updated and no longer hijacks file opening duties in Files or iCloud

Placeholder for iOS 11 'Files' App Goes Live on App Store

With just hours to go until Apple's WWDC keynote, a new placeholder app listing for a "Files" app has appeared on the iOS App Store for iPhone and iPad, as noticed by Steven Troughton-Smith. Details on the app are scant, as the app description is merely "Files App for iOS" and there are no other details on the app other than an icon depicting a blue folder, although Troughton-Smith points out the app only supports 64-bit architectures. iOS 11 has been rumored to be dropping support for 32-bit apps, and Apple has been warning users about apps that have not been updated with 64-bit support. As we noted in our iOS 11 wishlist feature, file management is one area where MacRumors readers have been hoping to see improvement, and this upcoming Files app could help provide that. The Files app is undoubtedly a default system app for iOS 11, but system apps that can be deleted have App Store entries to allow users to reinstall them. As Troughton-Smith notes, a listing for the Activity app has also appeared in the App Store, suggesting users will be able to delete the app in iOS 11, something that is not currently possible. Update 11:48 PM: Apple appears to have pulled the Files and Activity listings from the App