Apple Privacy Director Jane Horvath to Speak at CES in Consumer Privacy Roundtable

Apple will have a presence at this year's Consumer Electronics Show (CES) that's set to take place in January, but the company won't be showing off new products.

Apple will instead be discussing consumer privacy, as Bloomberg points out. Jane Horvath, Apple's senior director of privacy, will be attending a "Chief Privacy Officer Roundtable" alongside privacy executives from Facebook, Procter & Gamble, and the FTC.


The roundtable will focus on "what consumers want" when it comes to privacy. It will be held on Tuesday, January 7 at 1:00 p.m. at the Las Vegas Convention Center's North Hall, room N257. Attendance is included with CES registration.
Privacy is now a strategic imperative for all consumer businesses. "The future is private" (Facebook); "Privacy is a human right" (Apple); and "a more private web" (Google). How do companies build privacy at scale? Will regulation be a fragmented patchwork? Most importantly, what do consumers want?
Apple stopped attending CES in the 90s, and Apple's last official appearance took place in 1992 at the Chicago show, where then CEO John Sculley introduced the Apple Newton.


While Apple doesn't officially attend CES, it does send its employees to the show for meetings and to check out emerging technology. Last year, Apple also touted its privacy policies through a huge privacy-focused billboard right near the Las Vegas Convention Center that read "What Happens on your iPhone, stays on your ‌iPhone‌."

Tag: CES

Top Rated Comments

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7 weeks ago


Apple talking privacy is laughable? Timmy will sell the individual out without hesitation...

What about the finger print being collected from the naive :rolleyes:.


The fact that you keep referring to Cook as "Timmy" means that anything else you have to say can be immediately disregarded.
Rating: 13 Votes
7 weeks ago
"We respect your privacy, unless we are caught violating it". Apple.

"Everything stays on your iPhone, unless you live in China". Apple.
Rating: 12 Votes
7 weeks ago
Didn't Apple got caught about the location services just a few days ago??
Rating: 9 Votes
7 weeks ago
There’s no doubt in my mind that Apple can be better trusted with my data than any other tech-co. With a liberal sprinkling of my own additional vigilance, I’m more confident in using their system than I would be any other. Can’t really hope for much more in this digital era.
Rating: 7 Votes
7 weeks ago


There was no "catch"... your post is nothing but sensationalism

I'll highlight the pertinent parts so perhaps you will get it this time



So.. much ado about nothing. No data leaves your device, apple has no data

Meanwhile, your post is nothing but more like a PR spin by Apple.

About that "apple has no data", yeah, I shall only believe when I see.

They got caught red handed before and did not disclose ANYTHING until it was published.
They got caught about the location services now, so they are GOING TO add the toggle.
They got caught throttling the performance, so they finally admit they did that and THEN add the battery health "feature".

So go ahead, keep on spinning it. ?
Rating: 3 Votes
7 weeks ago


Didn't Apple got caught about the location services just a few days ago??

Poor example. Apple was tracking location to make a decision "on-device" as to whether another feature should be used (Ultra Wideband). There was no location tracking (history) and no data leaving the device to other services.


So, Apple is sending a troll to CES. I guess it's progress.

And judging by the responses in this thread, Apple is doing a fantastic job at trolling.

I say keep plugging away at privacy. It's clearly a sore issue with the Google/Android fans who desperately want to pretend that Apple collects as much data as they do and uses it for the same purposes so they can claim Apple is no different. It's just another lie. In the next few years when regulations start coming in to reign in the complete unfettered gathering of our data that companies like Google/Facebook are doing, Apple is going to come out looking pretty damn good (and without risk of losing their revenue - a very real threat to Google/Facebook).
Rating: 2 Votes
7 weeks ago
Apple talking privacy is laughable? Timmy will sell the individual out without hesitation...

What about the finger print being collected from the naive :rolleyes:.
Rating: 2 Votes
7 weeks ago


Any insight as to why Apple stopped attending CES and then suddenly decided to attend after how many years


I don’t think Apple never really relied on CES for anything, and that means there’s nothing they need to ‘demo’ their products, when their marketing is probably the best in the tech industry as it is through external sources (I.e. Keynotes, retailers, media outlets). But their whole goal is to promote infrastructure with privacy at CES, and I’m assuming they’re using them as leverage to establish what they advocate, which is privacy, which is a major value to them.
Rating: 2 Votes
7 weeks ago


Didn't Apple got caught about the location services just a few days ago??

There was no "catch"... your post is nothing but sensationalism

I'll highlight the pertinent parts so perhaps you will get it this time


Apple confirmed the feature was part of its ultra-wideband technology, which is part of its flagship U1 chip available across its latest handset lineup. Apple claims this gives its devices "spatial awareness" to see where other ultra-wideband devices are.

Why would you need this? Apple touts the ability to give directionally aware suggestions to people using AirDrop to share files between devices. It is also believed that the technology will play a role in its upcoming Tile-style object tracking kit.

The problem is, ultra-wideband tech is heavily regulated , and there are certain parts of the world where you can't use it.

"Ultra-wideband technology is an industry standard technology and is subject to international regulatory requirements that require it to be turned off in certain locations," Apple told TC. "iOS uses Location Services to help determine if an iPhone is in these prohibited locations in order to disable ultra-wideband and comply with regulations."

Cupertino added that all location data pertaining to ultra-wideband compliance is processed on the device, with nothing sent to Apple's servers.

Further, Apple said it also planned on releasing a toggle to deactivate ultra-wideband — and thus the intermittent location tracking — in a future iOS update.


So.. much ado about nothing. No data leaves your device, apple has no data
Rating: 2 Votes
7 weeks ago
What happens on your Macbook Pro stays in your head because the keyboard won't let you type on it correctly lol
Rating: 2 Votes

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