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Apple Launches Screen Replacement Program for Aluminum Series 2 and Series 3 Apple Watch Models

Apple today announced the launch of a new screen replacement program for Series 2 and Series 3 Apple Watch models, due to cracking issues.

Apple says that "under very rare circumstances" a crack can form along the rounded edge of the screen in aluminum Series 2 and Series 3 Apple Watch models, starting on one side of the screen and then continuing around it.


Customers with an eligible Apple Watch model can have their Apple Watch screen replaced free of charge from Apple or an Apple Authorized Service Provider if it is exhibiting this kind of crack. Affected customers can contact Apple support for a mail-in repair, visit an AASP, or visit an Apple retail store.

All Apple Watch Series 2 and Series 3 models in aluminum are included in the repair program, with a list available in Apple's support document.

Apple says that the new program covers eligible aluminum Apple Watch Series 2 and Series 3 models for three years after the first retail sale of the unit or one year from the start date of the program, whichever is longer.

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Top Rated Comments

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3 weeks ago
Jony Ive, though he created some really cool designs, has a history of consumer products littered with flaws that developed once his 'art' was used in the real world. Going back to the G4 cube, which developed cracks in its polycarbonate shell soon after its release.

Before that, the white iBooks developed cracks around the edges of the laptop.

Fast forward to the 'innovative' design of the butterfly keyboard (which turned out to be horribly flawed) and several problems in between.

I've said it before, but to me, a great designer makes stuff that not only looks cool, but also holds up in the world against wear, tear, weather, and human use. Jony Ive's designs too often failed the second part of that equation.
Rating: 34 Votes
3 weeks ago
"very rare circumstances" lol I worked at a London flagship and we saw this all the time
Rating: 25 Votes
3 weeks ago
The issue is about as rare as a medium-rare steak at a fine steakhouse.
Rating: 16 Votes
3 weeks ago
I went to Apple Store with exact same problem one week ago. They said me repair will cost $229 + tax. I declined. Watch stop working after this. Thank God I decided to wait until series 5 and not bought a new one. Created appointment with Genius bar on the next week.
Rating: 8 Votes
3 weeks ago

I wonder why the stainless steel models aren’t mentioned.

That‘s because they have sapphire glass also on the front side.
Rating: 8 Votes
3 weeks ago

This is why you aren’t a designer.

His main point is good design involves being fit for purpose. That should not be controversial.
Rating: 6 Votes
3 weeks ago
At some point, Apple’s business model of selling extremely expensive devices along with absolute denial of manufacturing/design/service flaws experienced by large numbers of customers is going to bite them in the a$$.

Apple’s innovation has been lagging for years. They have ridden the cool factor and race to the thinnest about as far as they can go. Each year the value proposition of their products diminishes greatly.
Rating: 4 Votes
3 weeks ago
I hope there will be refunds for prior paid repairs.
Rating: 4 Votes
3 weeks ago

Jony Ive, though he created some really cool designs, has a history of consumer products littered with flaws that developed once his 'art' was used in the real world. Going back to the G4 cube, which developed cracks in its polycarbonate shell soon after its release.

Before that, the white iBooks developed cracks around the edges of the laptop.

Fast forward to the 'innovative' design of the butterfly keyboard (which turned out to be horribly flawed) and several problems in between.

I've said it before, but to me, a great designer makes stuff that not only looks cool, but also holds up in the world against wear, tear, weather, and human use. Jony Ive's designs too often failed the second part of that equation.


I have a soft spot for Jony Ive.

I feel like no one is perfect.

What Apple may have needed was Jony Ive to design but then another guy to figure out materials and sturdiness. If they already have someone, get a better person or hire more people.
Rating: 4 Votes
3 weeks ago
best customer service in the industry.
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"very rare circumstances" lol I worked at a London flagship and we saw this all the time



And you didn't see any of the hundreds of thousands who didn't have the problem. There is a flaw in your logic.
Rating: 3 Votes

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