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Future iPhones, Apple Watches May Use New Power-Saving Backplane Technology to Extend Battery Life

Apple may adopt a new power-saving backplane technology for iPhone and Apple Watch displays in the long term, which should contribute to longer battery life on those devices, according to research firm IHS Markit.


For context, the backplane is responsible for turning individual pixels on and off, meaning that it plays a significant role in determining a display's resolution, refresh rate, and power consumption, as IHS explains.

At present, OLED displays in smartphones use LTPS TFT, or low-temperature polysilicon thin-film transistors, as the standard backplane technology. But, in the coming years, IHS believes Apple could switch to LTPO TFT, or low-temperature polycrystalline oxide, for the backplane in future iPhones.


In theory, IHS estimates that LTPO can save 5-15% in power consumption versus LTPS, resulting in extended battery life on future iPhones. The reasons for this are quite technical, but from a high level, IHS says that LTPO has an Oxide TFT structure that can reduce the power leakage of LTPS.

The more technical explanation is that power consumption would be especially reduced under a "switching model," where "the pixel circuit would be patterned such that the switching TFT would be p-Si and the drive TFT would be IGZO."

As the size and resolution of iPhone displays continues to increase, power consumption increases, so any battery life gains are beneficial.

IHS believes that Apple may also be interested in developing LTPO technology to gain more control over components of OLED displays, as it says manufacturers like Samsung and LG currently maintain exclusive control over the process.

Apple currently sources flexible OLED panels exclusively from Samsung, but LG may emerge as a second supplier as it aims for qualification, according to IHS. Samsung and LG are both suppliers of flexible OLED panels for the Apple Watch, too, and IHS says Apple may soon require them to look at LTPO.

IHS Markit believes Apple may ask display manufacturers to start deploying LTPO first on the Apple Watch, and then gradually introduce it in the iPhone display over the long term, as it did with OLED first on Apple Watch and then iPhone X.

Tag: IHS


Top Rated Comments

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21 weeks ago
Have you ever tried to add a bigger battery? Just saying.
Rating: 28 Votes
21 weeks ago
Yes, how about this kind of energy-sipping innovation plus bigger battery? Best of both worlds?

Whenever I see this kind of rumor, I envision a future "same great battery life" announcement with an even "thinner" battery inside. How about going the other way: imagine an announcement of "with double the battery life" for a change.
Rating: 14 Votes
21 weeks ago

Have you ever tried to add a bigger battery? Just saying.

At the very least, make it thick enough so that the rear camera lens no longer protrudes.
Rating: 12 Votes
21 weeks ago

Have you ever tried to add a bigger battery? Just saying.



Rating: 8 Votes
21 weeks ago
I can already envision the next keynote: We managed to drastically reduce the thickness. This is our thinnest phone yet, and it has an amazing 6 hours battery life.*

* when half of the pixels are black
Rating: 5 Votes
21 weeks ago
Is this going to be the same battery saving tech that Apple sneaked onto to iOS, slowed down phones and called it a "Feature"?
Rating: 5 Votes
21 weeks ago
Everyone here talking about Apple making things thinner and putting in bigger batterys knows every iPhone after the 6 has been thicker right?
Rating: 5 Votes
21 weeks ago
Future iPhones, Apple Watches May Use New Power-Saving Backplane Technology to *make them thinner

ftfy
Rating: 4 Votes
21 weeks ago

Have you ever tried to add a bigger battery? Just saying.


No phone can be all things to everyone. With the iPhone, Apple looks to make a phone that meets the needs of the largest group of people (being the general consumer). They collect all kinds of data about their customer usage of the iPhone and use this to inform many of the choices they make in creating new models. One of these is battery usage. The vast majority get through the day on a single charge without issue. This shows that their current battery is more than adequate for the majority of users. While they will continue to look for ways to improve battery life, increasing the size of the battery (which results in increased price of the phone) isn't needed, as most are just fine with the current battery size.

Sorry, but if you need more battery life, you should either look to a battery case, portable charger, or a different phone. Apple has made it very clear over the past couple years that expanding the size of the iPhone battery is not something they're interested in doing.
Rating: 4 Votes
21 weeks ago
Let's just make Jony Ive thinner. Once he's thin enough, throw him in an envelope, and mail him off to Tesla where he can start making anorexic cars.
Rating: 3 Votes

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