Microsoft's Edge Browser for iOS Gaining Built-In Adblock Plus Functionality

Microsoft is testing built-in Adblock Plus integration in its mobile Edge browser available for both iOS and Android devices, reports The Verge.

With built-in Adblock Plus functionality, Edge browser users on iOS will not need to download a separate ad blocking app, which may attract more users to Microsoft's browser. Adblock Plus can be enabled in Microsoft Edge's settings, with no add-on app required.


Google has built ad blocking into Chrome for Android devices, but it is somewhat limited and not available on iOS devices. As noted by The Verge, Adblock Plus is a more aggressive ad blocking option.

iOS Safari users can, of course, install one of several ad block apps available in the iOS App Store, but there is no native ad blocking functionality in Safari.

Adblock Plus is available in a beta capacity on both Android and iOS devices at the current time, with Microsoft planning to roll the feature out to all Edge for iOS and Android users in the near future.

Microsoft has made its Edge browser available across a range of devices, including iPhones, iPads, and Android devices in addition to Windows computers. The Edge browser includes syncing of favorites, passwords, and reading lists, along with a "Continue on PC" option for transferring what you're reading from the mobile Edge browser to the desktop.



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16 months ago

iOS Safari users can, of course, install one of several ad block apps available in the iOS App Store, but there is no native ad blocking functionality in Safari.


I guess it depends on your definition of native. WebKit content blocking exists, and it is indeed built right into Safari – the third-party app is just needed to load filter lists into the content blocker.
Rating: 4 Votes
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16 months ago

Didn’t know they had “ad blocking” apps for safari on iOS. Has anyone noticed any performance/speed drops when using any of these apps?


Since iOS 9! No issues with speed. In fact, it'll make Safari feel faster. 1Blocker is my favorite. I definitely recommend it.
Rating: 3 Votes
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16 months ago



I am definitely being pedantic. :)


As long as you acknowledge it. ;)

I merely thought you might not know, now... I am the one who looks dumb. Haha, thanks for the good spirited post.
Rating: 2 Votes
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16 months ago

How does an ad blocking VPN work? You aren't installing a new root CA for HTTPS (or at least I hope you're not), so it'll only work with the increasingly small number of plain HTTP sites.

Ultimately it’s a VPN that establishes a DNS list for the sites you don’t want. That’s how they describe it. I haven’t gotten down to nitty gritty. Seems to work much better than other alternatives I’ve tried.
Rating: 1 Votes
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16 months ago
I'd installing anything Microsuc on my Apple devices, just as soon as I'd shoot myself in the head.
Rating: 1 Votes
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16 months ago
You know, it'd be cool to take this - and a great many other browsers - out for a spin, but first Apple needs to allow us to change our default browser in IOS. I've looked but can't find a way to do so. Click any link at all and up comes Safari.

I'm not complaining too loudly, as I don't mind Safari. But if other browsers are going to get any traction at all, this functionality needs to be in place. Microsoft was forced to do so at one point in time. Wonder if the EU will complain to its courts about Apple about this.
Rating: 1 Votes
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16 months ago

I guess it depends on your definition of native. WebKit content blocking exists, and it is indeed built right into Safari – the third-party app is just needed to load filter lists into the content blocker.


I think the fact that it requires a 3rd party app required to load the filter lists means that it's not native. Edge, Chrome, Firefox, and Opera each have the ability to block ads as well, but it's not considered 'native' if it involves a 3rd party app. Chrome started by adding a native 'Google' ad block to it's browser, and Edge is following suite by addigng a 'Microsoft' ad block. Safari doesn't offer that option, although it can be supported by 3rd parties.

Make sense?
Rating: 1 Votes
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16 months ago

As long as you acknowledge it. ;)

I merely thought you might not know, now... I am the one who looks dumb. Haha, thanks for the good spirited post.


The first step towards recovery is admitting you have a problem. :D
Rating: 1 Votes
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16 months ago

I think the fact that it requires a 3rd party app required to load the filter lists means that it's not native. Edge, Chrome, Firefox, and Opera each have the ability to block ads as well, but it's not considered 'native' if it involves a 3rd party app. Chrome started by adding a native 'Google' ad block to it's browser, and Edge is following suite by addigng a 'Microsoft' ad block. Safari doesn't offer that option, although it can be supported by 3rd parties.

Make sense?


Yes, it does, but at the same time, ad blockers for Edge, Firefox, and Chrome (if you want "real" ad blocking) all necessitate the usage of an extension like uBlock Origin that was built using extension API's. Apple actually makes the ad blocker for you. So, I guess you could consider it "more native" in certain ways?

Opera's ad blocking is 100% native, though. They built the blocker, pre-load filter lists (EasyList, EasyPrivacy, Anti-Blocker Blockers, and NoCoin), and even give you the option of importing your own – it's just turned off by default.

I am definitely being pedantic. :)
Rating: 1 Votes
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16 months ago
Just another attempt from the data miners to spread their tenicles.

I avoid Google, Apple and Microsoft browsers. They already know far too much about me.
Rating: 1 Votes
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