Google Has No Plans For More Pixel Notebooks

Google has ended production of its Pixel laptop, which originally aimed to compete with Apple's MacBook Air.

During a small meeting with journalists today at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Google's senior vice president for hardware Rick Osterlohthe responded to a question about future Pixel notebooks, saying the company has "no plans to do one right now".

According to TechCrunch, he added that versions already on the market have totally sold out and there are no plans to make any more of them. However, Osterlohthe was quick to clarify that he was not referring to the notebooks' operating system, ChromeOS.


"Chrome OS is a huge initiative in the company," Osterloh said. "Google hasn't backed away from laptops. We have the number two market share in the U.S. and U.K. — but we have no plans for Google-branded laptops."
Google's Chromebook was the first device to carry the Pixel name, which has since been adopted by the tech giant's latest range of branded smartphones. The original Pixel laptops were launched in 2013 and were notable for their integrated hardware – which included a touchscreen – and their premium design appeal, but the web-only operating system only ran Chrome browser and a handful of other cloud-based apps, and prices started at $1,299.

The second version of the Pixel Chromebook launched in 2015 and cost $999. It was one of the first laptops to feature USB-C along with Apple's 12-inch Retina MacBook, but saw limited uptake due to the restrictive OS and prohibitive cost. Other third-party Chromebooks sell for as little as $250.

There's no cast-iron guarantee that Google won't launch any more branded laptops, but it seems the company wants to keep the Pixel name for its phones going forward, the only caveat being Google's Pixel C tablet, which it still sells.



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29 months ago
I'm SHOCKED that Google would produce an expensive piece of hardware for such a limited amount of time. Let me find my glasses so I can read this again...
Rating: 19 Votes
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29 months ago
"It's odd that folks didn't want to fork over $1,000+ for a Google-branded web-based laptop."
-No One Ever
Rating: 17 Votes
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29 months ago
The only point of the Pixel laptop was to get tech writers like at the Verge to oogle it and write stories about how Apple isn't the only one who can do premium design. Nothing more than a vanity excercise.
Rating: 13 Votes
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29 months ago
This is not shocking. Google may be a fun company to work for, but they have the attention span of a 5-year old when it comes to their devices. Instead of improving it year after year, they completely axe it and start on something new. Smh. The pixel was a solid device, it'd be nice to get a Pixel 2.
Rating: 9 Votes
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29 months ago
Our Lady of Transitory Endeavors did it again!
Rating: 7 Votes
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29 months ago
Well they were horribly overpriced.

And I don't just mean that in the "It doesn't make sense to have such a limited OS on high-end hardware" kind of way. It was horribly overpriced hardware for its specs regardless of the OS those laptops ran.

You could literally buy a rMBP and set Chrome to open in full screen at launch and it'd be a much better deal...
Rating: 5 Votes
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29 months ago
My folks recently bought a £300 aluminium ChromeBook to use alongside a 2009 13 inch Macbook. I'm not sure of the manufacturer. I have to say, the build of the machine is very good, and the OS seems rather nice. Quite "Apple-like". Amazed what a modest sum of money can buy.

By contrast, I just bought a 15" £900 Dell Inspiron for to run some Windows-only software, and it is bloody awful. I quite literally hate it.
Rating: 5 Votes
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29 months ago

The only point of the Pixel laptop was to get tech writers like at the Verge to oogle it and write stories about how Apple isn't the only one who can do premium design. Nothing more than a vanity excercise.


And The Verge is silent on the news of the Chromebook Pixel being cancelled. Isn't it weird how they totally hype everything Google does when Google announces it and then they downplay or outright ignore when these Google "game changer" projects utterly fail? Google Glass? Project Ara? How about every Nexus (and now Pixel) phone getting branded as Google's "REAL first attempt" to design a phone themselves to take on the iPhone -- as if the previous iterations were "practice shots" and didn't count.

"The Verge" could be rebranded as "Google PR".
Rating: 4 Votes
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29 months ago
If you don't have sales you don't have a product and you end up with no market.

That is why I still buy MacBooks, they sell well and have market. Beside that, I love my MacBook Pro 15" (Touch Bar Edition).
Rating: 3 Votes
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29 months ago
I am really glad I stopped using Google products. There was a time when I thought they were really innovative and that Android and Chromebooks were the future of computing, but seeing them drop support for products and services, almost on a whim, rather than trying to grow the product, really solidifies my decision to completely drop Google. Apple may take their sweet time, but you can count on their investment in their products and services.
Rating: 3 Votes
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