Apple Watch Series 2 is Fine for Swimming, but Scuba Diving and Waterskiing Not Recommended

One of the key new features of the Apple Watch Series 2 is an improved water resistance rating of up to 50 meters under ISO standard 22810:2010, which by definition means the watch can be used for shallow-water activities such as swimming in a pool or ocean, white water rafting, and fishing without risking water damage.

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These activities are in addition to the previous IPX7 splash resistance that allows for the Apple Watch, including first-generation models, to be worn while washing your hands or jogging in the rain. Many original Apple Watch owners also routinely shower and swim with the device, although Apple never officially recommended such activities.


However, while the Apple Watch Series 2 has improved water and dust resistance, fine print on Apple's website says the device should not be used while scuba diving, waterskiing, or other activities involving high-velocity water or submersion below shallow depth, presumably including jet skiing and deep water snorkeling.
Apple Watch Series 2 has a water resistance rating of 50 meters under ISO standard 22810:2010. This means that it may be used for shallow-water activities like swimming in a pool or ocean. However, Apple Watch Series 2 should not be used for scuba diving, waterskiing, or other activities involving high-velocity water or submersion below shallow depth.
Apple Watch Series 2 models are priced from $369 and will be available starting Friday, September 16 in the U.S. and select other launch countries.

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34 months ago
50 meters = 164 feet. How is that shallow and who is snorkeling deeper than 50 meters?
Rating: 8 Votes
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34 months ago
Underwater snorkeling? I didn't realize there was more than one way to do it
Rating: 6 Votes
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34 months ago

So how does it work?

Meter ratings for water resistance are a simplification (from atmospheres), they mean that the watch (or other device) can withstand pressure equivalent to being/sitting in water that deep. If you gently, gradually lowered it down in water to that depth, it'd probably be fine. But as soon as you start waving your arm around, you're actually increasing the pressure on the watch significantly. So if you swim at 50 meters, the watch dies. Thus, "50M water resistance" doesn't actually mean you should dive to 50 meters with it (thats why they make 100M, 200M, and 300M watches - they don't expect many divers are going nearly 1,000ft down, but they're useful at much shallower depths). This also ties into why they don't recommend water skiing - when you fall off, you don't go very deep, but you can slam into the water pretty hard, generating rather astonishing amounts of water pressure.

In other news, a "2x4" isn't actually 2 inches by 4 inches.
Rating: 5 Votes
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34 months ago
The Watch is rated to IPX7 I believe that only covers temporary submersion up to max depth of 1M. Scuba diving exceeds that.

Waterskiing... fine in itself but when you go flying across the water like a rag doll it is the equivalent as smashing against the pavement. Why would you do that to your watch ?

This is not so much a shocking revelation as common sense.
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But surfing is OK!?

That doesn't really make sense ... I'll pit a double overhead wipeout against falling off a wakeboard any day ...


You come off a board at lower velocity so it is no different than a dive in to a pool really as for as the stresses on the device are concerned.
Rating: 3 Votes
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34 months ago
I've already used my Apple Watch 1 for waterskiing 3 times now. Not to mention dozens of times swimming in pools, lakes, and even salty oceans. Works like a champ. I bought my watch to use it, not baby it.
Rating: 2 Votes
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34 months ago

50 meters = 164 feet. How is that shallow and who is snorkeling deeper than 50 meters?


This guy -

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herbert_Nitsch
Rating: 2 Votes
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34 months ago
Waterskied all summer with Watch 1.
Rating: 2 Votes
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34 months ago
But surfing is OK!?

That doesn't really make sense ... I'll pit a double overhead wipeout against falling off a wakeboard any day ...
Rating: 1 Votes
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34 months ago

The Watch is rated to IPX7 I believe that only covers temporary submersion up to max depth of 1M. Scuba diving exceeds that.

Watch series 1 is IPX7, not the 2.
Rating: 1 Votes
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34 months ago

Meter ratings for water resistance are a simplification (from atmospheres), they mean that the watch (or other device) can withstand pressure equivalent to being/sitting in water that deep. If you gently, gradually lowered it down in water to that depth, it'd probably be fine. But as soon as you start waving your arm around, you're actually increasing the pressure on the watch significantly. So if you swim at 50 meters, the watch dies. Thus, "50M water resistance" doesn't actually mean you should dive to 50 meters with it (thats why they make 100M, 200M, and 300M watches - they don't expect many divers are going nearly 1,000ft down, but they're useful at much shallower depths). In other news, a "2x4" isn't actually 2 inches by 4 inches.

Thank you for the explanation.
So if I'm swimming at sea or in the pool or just sitting in the jacuzzi I'll be completely fine? That's a 370$ device I'm scared that if something will happen Apple won't take responsibility for it.
Rating: 1 Votes
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