Apple today announced the launch of a new series of "Tech Talks" for the Apple TV, designed to help developers learn how to create apps and games for Apple's new set-top box. The Tech Talks are held in a number of cities around the world and are hosted by "Apple experts."

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The new Apple TV is here, bringing incredible and immersive apps and games to the big screen. Get in-depth technical information on building and designing for tvOS, learn refined coding techniques, and obtain valuable development instruction from Apple experts.

Developers can register to attend a Tech Talk through Apple's website, with registration open from now until November 13 at 10:00 a.m. Pacific Time. Dates and locations are below.

  • Toronto - December 7, 2015
  • Los Angeles - December 10, 2015
  • Austin - December 14, 2015
  • Seattle - December 16, 2015
  • Cupertino - December 17 and 18, 2015
  • Berlin - January 8, 2016
  • London - January 11, 2016
  • New York - January 12, 2016
  • Tokyo - January 21, 2016
  • Sydney - February 3, 2016

Each of Apple's all-day Tech Talks will include morning sessions focused on the Apple TV's capabilities, designing apps, creating interfaces, integrating the Siri remote and game controllers, and using on-demand resources. Afternoon sessions will focus on topics like technologies for graphics and gaming, media streaming, and more, and a reception will follow giving attendees a chance to interact with each other and Apple's staff.

Update 11/16: Apple is now choosing lottery winners for its Apple TV Tech Talks and notifying winning developers.

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Top Rated Comments

mw360 Avatar
99 months ago
No keyboard support means very limited user input capabilities in my opinion, especially for apps that would require text as the main method of input in order to use the app.
I think you've inadvertently nailed why BT keyboards aren't supported. Allowing it would encourage developers to create apps which depend on text 'as the main method of input'. I strongly suspect Apple don't want any such apps on the AppleTV. It's not a computer, it's for kicking back and just doing TV stuff. Not tweeting, web-browsing or making to-do lists. Sure, some people will claim to want those, but IMHO, they'd be a cumbersome use for most people's TV, and this would be reflected as negative points in reviews.
Score: 4 Votes (Like | Disagree)
CFreymarc Avatar
99 months ago
I think you've inadvertently nailed why BT keyboards aren't supported. Allowing it would encourage developers to create apps which depend on text 'as the main method of input'. I strongly suspect Apple don't want any such apps on the AppleTV. It's not a computer, it's for kicking back and just doing TV stuff. Not tweeting, web-browsing or making to-do lists. Sure, some people will claim to want those, but IMHO, they'd be a cumbersome use for most people's TV, and this would be reflected as negative points in reviews.
Agree. I had some family and other guests over a while ago and let them have at it with my Apple TV to see their reactions.

The most surprising expectation seen was using Siri as a "keyboard replacement" in some apps. For example, in the App Store, when they got to the search field, they expected Siri would voice-to-text instead of using a keyboard.

Others were asking to download and buy apps just by talking to Siri. The younger the user, the more apt they were to use Siri. Another reaction was the remote was "too small" where some felt it was prone to get lost in a living room full of kids.
Score: 1 Votes (Like | Disagree)