Apple Updates Privacy Site to Explain How It Handles Personal Information

Apple today updated the privacy section of its website with a noticeable expansion that CEO Tim Cook said is aimed at explaining how the company handles each user's personal information, "what we do and don't collect," and why that is. In an introduction letter for the new site expansion, Cook stated that Apple has always been upfront and honest with the sharing and distribution of a user's data, only doing so when they were well aware of each time it happens. He, and the company, hopes this site continues to reassure customers of Apple's trustworthiness.

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We believe in telling you up front exactly what’s going to happen to your personal information and asking for your permission before you share it with us. And if you change your mind later, we make it easy to stop sharing with us. Every Apple product is designed around those principles. When we do ask to use your data, it’s to provide you with a better user experience.

We’re publishing this website to explain how we handle your personal information, what we do and don’t collect, and why. We’re going to make sure you get updates here about privacy at Apple at least once a year and whenever there are significant changes to our policies.
The website is segmented into four different tabs, the first being "Our Approach to Privacy," detailing the process Apple takes in building privacy and encryption into everything it makes, including apps like iMessage and services like Apple Pay. "Manage Your Privacy" reminds users of the suite of tools Apple has created to ensure their own security when using an Apple device, thanks to features like Touch ID and passcode lock. The page even goes so far as to instruct customers in the steps of being aware of a phishing scam and how to limit ad-tracking on your iPhone.

In the "Government Information Requests" portion of the updated website, the company ensures that when a government agency requests data to be revealed to them from an Apple device, they "require that it be accompanied by the appropriate legal documents such as a subpoena or search warrant." The company also promises it's never worked with a government agency to install a "backdoor" into one of its devices or apps, nor has it allowed government access to its servers, stating finally that it "never will."

The final section is simply Apple's updated Privacy Policy, which the company promises to update at least once a year, or "whenever there are significant changes to our policies."



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50 months ago

I pretty much go on the assumption that nothing I do is private anymore.

I lead a much happier life that way.


That's not a happy way to live at all. Rolling over and assuming no one has privacy is a horrible way to live. It makes us no better than North Korea, frankly. And unless people continue to tell their governments that this is not OK, we will all get exactly what we deserve.
Rating: 12 Votes
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50 months ago
So far Apple haven't shown any signs of personal information abuse. They make their money (and a heck of a lot of it) off of selling you products. And while there is money to be made in selling others the product that is you, I don't think it's enough money to tempt them to jeopardize the relationship of trust they are trying to maintain with their customers.

The time may come when that will change. But for now, I feel that my personal information is secure with Apple.
Rating: 9 Votes
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50 months ago
I pretty much go on the assumption that nothing I do is private anymore.

I lead a much happier life that way.
Rating: 8 Votes
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50 months ago

I pretty much go on the assumption that nothing I do is private anymore.

I lead a much happier life that way.

It is precisely this mindset that has gotten us into this mess. No thank you. We do not live in a utopian fantasy land. There are real people out there, right now, who would force their will and beliefs on you if they could. They would round up people with dissenting political, religious, or sexual opinions. These technological tools give them the power to find those who oppose them and limit their free speech, or worse—threaten their friends and family.

History has shown that this happens time and time again when too much power is given. That is why the forefathers of the United States had taken such great care in putting many limits on government powers. The checks and balances. It is not a balanced approach to continually monitor the every action of citizens who have done nothing wrong. However, it does enable corrupt leaders to effectively operate. Will this happen overnight? No. These things rarely do. It is the slow slide into oblivion that tricks most people into thinking everything is fine, and we've been sliding for at least 12-14 years—perhaps longer. You may be happy now, but that happiness is foolish and fleeting.
Rating: 6 Votes
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50 months ago


Rating: 5 Votes
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50 months ago

I pretty much go on the assumption that nothing I do is private anymore.

I lead a much happier life that way.


That's cowardly and unamerican: being happy to see a fundamental right erode into nothing. I assume that things I do in private stay private, and I do something to mitigate or change the situation when it turns out my understanding was wrong.
Rating: 5 Votes
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50 months ago
There are still a lot of things that they could do in this field. For instance, let users remove their Apple IDs and their personal information when they abandon their Apple product(s) (compare this with Google or Microsoft), let users download a copy of their data Apple has on their servers (Google does this), support OpenVPN and OpenPGP natively, let users see a list of their saved Wi-Fi networks on iOS (to avoid sniffing), improve cookie management (e.g. let users delete cookies from websites that have not been visited in X days, some websites store cookies with a huge lifespan), add a permission dialog when an app wants to access iCloud Drive (many games do this and it’s annoying). I could go on, but these are the things I wish Apple would do eventually.
Rating: 3 Votes
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50 months ago
As personal privacy becomes a bigger issue for many, it's nice to see some outlining their policies.
Rating: 3 Votes
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50 months ago
Maybe Apple's not collecting and/or distributing our data maliciously, but government agencies are, and maybe not in accordance with Apple policy.

But I commend Apple for being straightforward. I trust them way more than Google at least.
Rating: 3 Votes
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50 months ago

That's not a happy way to live at all. Rolling over and assuming no one has privacy is a horrible way to live. It makes us no better than North Korea, frankly. And unless people continue to tell their governments that this is not OK, we will all get exactly what we deserve.


This x 1,000,000
Rating: 3 Votes
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