'Borderlands: The Pre-Sequel' Launches Simultaneously on Mac, PC, and Consoles

Borderlands: The Pre-Sequel, launching today for Mac, PC, and consoles, is the third game in the popular Borderlands series. Set at a time in between the first and second Borderland titles, The Pre-Sequel, like its predecessors, is a first person shooter that incorporates RPG elements.

In Borderlands: The Pre-Sequel, players can play as one of four characters, each with unique abilities: Nisha the Lawbringer, Athena the Gladiator, Wilhelm the Enforcer, and Claptrap the Fragtrap. The storyline will see gamers fighting alongside Handsome Jack in an attempt to save Pandora's moon.

Discover the story behind Borderlands 2 villain, Handsome Jack, and his rise to power. Taking place between the original Borderlands and Borderlands 2, the Pre-Sequel gives you a whole lotta new gameplay featuring the genre blending fusion of shooter and RPG mechanics that players have come to love.

Float through the air with each low gravity jump while taking enemies down from above using new ice and laser weapons. Catch-a-ride and explore the lunar landscape with new vehicles allowing for more levels of destructive mayhem.
Borderlands: The Pre-Sequel is launching simultaneously on the Mac, PC, and consoles (PS3 and Xbox 360), which is a bit unusual as major games typically launch on PC and consoles before a Mac version becomes available.

The Mac version of Borderlands: The Pre-Sequel, published by Aspyr, can be downloaded from Aspyr's GameAgent.com, the Mac App Store [Direct Link], and Steam for $59.99. The game is available in North America today, with access coming to Australia and Europe on October 17.



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59 months ago
Any company that supports same day releases of OS X and PC titles is a company I can stand behind.
Rating: 13 Votes
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59 months ago
it is on linux aswell.
Rating: 4 Votes
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59 months ago

Why do you say that? Never been any issues for me. If you try to run a modern game on an old machine, you're gonna have a bad time...windows, Mac, Linux...don't make a piss of difference. So what if I can't make out the bumps on Nisha's areolas?


It can make a difference when the game hasn't been developed natively for Mac (meaning developers had to make an OpenGL version of their engine). A lot of developers go the easy route and release a "Cider-wrapped" version of their game which is really just the Windows version running through an emulation layer. In that case (and it's really common), then the OS choice does make a difference, since said emulation layer affects performance significantly. The same Mac running the Windows version of a game trough Boot Camp have better performance vs the OS X version.

See here for a complete explanation of the difference between a native and non-native Mac game: http://blog.gameagent.com/mac-gaming-101-understanding-native-vs-non-native-games-part-two/

That doesn't mean OS X isn't suitable for gaming, it's good enough for a lot of people, but still, if you want the best gaming performance for your hardware, you're usually served better by using the Windows version of a game on a Boot Camp partition rather than using the OS X version.
Rating: 4 Votes
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59 months ago
Loves me some Borderlands, but I'm afraid I'll have to wait until it goes on sale on Steam. I can't pay top dollar for games anymore, Steam and Humble Bundle have ruined me.:o
Rating: 4 Votes
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59 months ago
didn't finish borderlands 2. lost interest.
Rating: 3 Votes
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59 months ago

Lol @ Mac version, should be fun to see how bad it runs


Why do you say that? Never been any issues for me. If you try to run a modern game on an old machine, you're gonna have a bad time...windows, Mac, Linux...don't make a piss of difference. So what if I can't make out the bumps on Nisha's areolas?
Rating: 2 Votes
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59 months ago
Lol @ Mac version, should be fun to see how bad it runs
Rating: 2 Votes
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59 months ago

A lot of developers go the easy route and release a "Cider-wrapped" version of their game which is really just the Windows version running through an emulation layer.


Not actually very many Mac games were released like that. The vast majority are "real" ports, though that doesn't necessarily mean they will run better; occasionally the port is just shoddy. Anyway Borderlands 2 runs flawlessly, so I expect Borderlands 1.5 does as well (ported by the same company).

--Eric
Rating: 1 Votes
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59 months ago

...anyway for the dude explaining about non native osx games. cider/wine is not an "emulation later" infact wine is a recursive acronym for "Wine is not an emulator" lets just say it gives the software access to the hardware that osx doesn't know about. there's is barely any performance hit on port like that especially with cider if done right.


The best way to explain Wine is to say that it gives Windows software a little reverse engineered compatibility layer inside of OSX/Linux to play in. In a best case scenario, you can expect nearly identical performance. But since the thing is a constantly evolving work in progress, and MS is always shifting and changing their APIs around, getting that best case scenario is a rare thing, especially for newer games.

Wine isn't bad, but far more often than not, a native port will run better.
Rating: 1 Votes
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59 months ago
Can't think of a worse consumer decision than buying a Mac for the purpose of gaming.
Rating: 1 Votes
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