New iMovie for Mac Update Provides Look at Potential of Force Touch Trackpad

imoviemacWhile Apple updated iMovie for Mac on March 9 with Photos integration and noted it in the "What's New" section, Apple did not mention it also gained additional support for the new Force Touch Trackpad. The new feature was first found by freelance film editor Alex Gollner (via Wired) and is described in an Apple support document.
When dragging a video clip to its maximum length, you’ll get feedback letting you know you’ve hit the end of the clip. Add a title and you’ll get feedback as the title snaps into position at the beginning or end of a clip. Subtle feedback is also provided with the alignment guides that appear in the Viewer when cropping clips.
Gollner notes that the new feature allowed him to "feel" his way around iMovie's user interface, which means that he could do certain tasks without looking at the screen. He goes on to say that the new feature feels like a sign of the future for Apple devices, with users being able to feel their way through UI elements that he calls "bumpy pixels".

iMovie for Mac [Direct Link] comes free with every new Mac, and this new version of the software is available as a free update for existing owners of the app. iMovie for Mac is otherwise available in the Mac App Store for $14.99.

Tag: iMovie


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23 months ago

This is certainly not a new concept.


Why do people still point out that Apple's new releases aren't new concepts? Apple never really invented anything, nor do they claim to. Even USB-C, which supposedly Apple had a hand in designing, they didn't even go taking credit for.

What Apple does take credit for, is putting technology together in a novel, easy-to-use approach.

Bringing up some obscure piece of tech that nobody ever used, saw or heard about doesn't prove any point besides the company in question (Logitech, in this case) failed at creating and marketing a useful product. No, I'm not going to buy a mouse that I have to configure with every app I use to product haptic feedback. If I have to configure your product to function properly, I should be getting a share of the profits.

PS. Apple didn't invent the smartphone, the tablet computer, the laptop or the GUI either. I know! Mind blown, right?!
Rating: 13 Votes
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23 months ago

This will...*force*...everyone to upgrade their Macs.


Your joke is 5% funny; but man I really like your sarcastic email signature. That, my good sir, is 100% funny. Well done.
Rating: 9 Votes
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23 months ago

This is certainly not a new concept. Does anyone remember the Logitech "iFeel" mouse? It basically did this. There was a little haptic engine inside that could be configured to create different sensations when the user moved over certain user interface elements.

"Basically" doesn't count. "Basically," game controllers had haptic feedback for years before that, too.

Except that this is haptic feedback in a trackpad, directly built into an application (not "configured" by the user), and (likely, eventually, if it isn't already) a native part of the operating system.

So this is actually new. Not shockingly revolutionary by any means. But still new.

The internet is not a race to be the first to piss all over something.
Rating: 8 Votes
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23 months ago
Like the rumble strips along a highway. Lets you drive by feel instead of looking.

(I'm kidding, of course. Please, for the love of all that is good, do not actually attempt that.)
Rating: 6 Votes
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23 months ago
This will...*force*...everyone to upgrade their Macs.
Rating: 5 Votes
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23 months ago
I actually really like this. Anything to make technology more intimate and alive is good because computers as they are are quite dead masses of circuits. A Mac that touches you back seems to me like a good way to subtly make the Mac experience more enjoyable. I think this technology is greatly under valued, and so far (as is natural) greatly under utilized. Not because it's the next frontier of computing, but because it makes personal computers more personal
Rating: 4 Votes
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23 months ago
Can't wait for Samsung Force
Rating: 2 Votes
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23 months ago

As far as iMovie goes, I can't stand the new version. I tried to like it, but couldn't... Anyone else feel the same? Or am I the only one?



It took me a hot minute to get used to it, but now I like it more. Mostly just for the super importing
Rating: 2 Votes
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23 months ago

Can't wait for Samsung Force


I know you're joking, but all OEMs have been nowhere close to Apple with the quality of their trackpad. Force Touch is just the next step.

I've been using a new rMBP at work with the Force Touch trackpad. It's absolutely incredible - you cannot believe that it does not click. Plus with the 2x faster flash, quicker RAM, upgraded CPU/GPU and better battery life, I have to say that the recent rMBP update has been one of the best 'spec bump' updates I can remember.

The new 13" rMBP is an absolutely stunning machine. Plus it's relatively cheap/good value by Apple's standards.
Rating: 1 Votes
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23 months ago

But I am aware of "things" that have been available for ever but never wanted to interact with them until someone like Apple sell me the idea.


Ideas are one thing. What Apple does well is implementation. Look at the Magic Mouse. While I have no specific knowledge of the existence of any particular multi-touch mouse that preceded the Magic Mouse, I fully expect that someone else probably came up with the idea or their own model first. And I'm sure some eager MR reader will take immense pleasure in revealing who.
But what Apple did was make the multi-touch mouse standard on their desktops, a multi-touch trackpad standard on their laptops, and then baked multi-touch directly into the OS - not just the Finder, but the standard apps, and the APIs for developers, and implemented gestures that were both logical and natural.
People wailed and gnashed their teeth over the new gestures introduced in Lion, rushing to "un-reverse" the scroll direction. But now, I can't remember a time when I wasn't multi-touch swiping, scrolling and zooming my way around any of my Macs. And I'm someone who already -and still- heavily navigated through Finder with the keyboard, typing parts of file/folder names and using command-key sequences to take actions. Just absent mindedly rubber-banding the contents of a window with a couple of flicks of your fingers while waiting on the phone or trying to think of a solution to a problem... these are the sorts of little joys Windows users are unable to understand.
Windows, while always clunky and awkward is even more so now. Put a Lenovo keyboard and mouse (as is the standard for Windows PCs at my work) and Windows 7 in front of me and my productivity halves (at least). The towering keys, the bulky, unresponsive, uninstinctive mouse with too many buttons that require too much thought, the lack of multi-touch gestures, the awkward window-heavy interface (seriously, after 5 minutes I have 12 Windows Explorer windows open, of only 3 unique folders, because everything gets in the way of everything else) that seems to strongly discourage simply dragging things where you want them (in preference for cut/copy/pasting).
My point being that what Apple's selling you is not the idea, it's the implementation. Part of their strength in making "the whole widget" - both the device itself, and the OS and APIs that can best take advantage of the device.
Rating: 1 Votes
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