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Apple Adds 'Learn More About In-App Purchases' Feature to iPad App Store

As noted by AppAdvice, Apple yesterday added a new "Learn More About In-App Purchases" feature to the iPad version of the App Store, marking yet another step in the company's efforts to make users aware that some free and paid apps may offer the ability to purchase additional content from within the apps.

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The document includes four sections, addressing what In-App Purchases are, types of In-App Purchases, how they work, and how Parental Controls in iOS can be used to turn the feature off entirely.
On devices running iOS 4.3 or later, you must enter your password to make an In-App Purchase. Once you enter your password to make that purchase, additional In-App Purchases can be made without reentering your password for 15 minutes. To change your settings to require a password entry with every purchase, open Settings, tap General, then tap Restrictions, and change Require Password.
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The new addition comes roughly a month after Apple added prominent "Offers In-App Purchases" labels on App Store pages for apps supporting the feature. The company also recently settled a lawsuit related to children having been able to make In-App Purchases, occasionally for as much as thousands of dollars, without authorization.

The new informational feature is currently visible only in the iPad version of the App Store, and it is unclear if and when it will make its way to the App Store on the iPhone and in iTunes.

Top Rated Comments

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21 months ago

All this just to stop silly, uneducated parents letting their kids run up thousands on their credit card.

Never give a tech product to a child that you don't fully understand yourself.


I disagree with your assessment and your tone.
Rating: 8 Votes
21 months ago
These changes are a good step and really low hanging fruit.

Many people are not computer literate and to help them understand concepts such as In App Purchases is a good thing. Try to educate your user base. They will get more out of the product.
Rating: 2 Votes
21 months ago
This changes everything.
Rating: 2 Votes
21 months ago

I disagree with your assessment and your tone.


Phew, thanks for that. I was waiting eagerly on your opinion of my comment. I will be able to sleep peacefully tonight!
Rating: 2 Votes
21 months ago

There's nothing to do with computer literacy here. It's simple english language. If you don't know the meanings of the words "Purchase" or "Buy" and don't know that a dollar sign followed by numbers indicates a price, you need some elementary school, not a half assed in-app purchase wiki.

If you can't teach your kids words like "Purchase" and "Buy" you shouldn't be procreating, much less be giving your kid an iOS Device.


It has everything to do with computer literacy. It is explaining terms such as "In App Purchase". You may understand what it means, but others do not.

You don't obviously don't have any kids - although you can teach them what Buy and Purchase their excitement will overcome their objective thinking.

The world is not as black and white as you may think.
Rating: 2 Votes
21 months ago

All this just to stop silly, uneducated parents letting their kids run up thousands on their credit card.

Never give a tech product to a child that you don't fully understand yourself.


Well, since they made the change over a year ago to make in-app purchases require the device password, no, this really has nothing to do with that problem.

Unless you somehow feel it needed solving twice?
Rating: 1 Votes
21 months ago

Nothing about what I consider the major issues of IAP, like Lodsys or the people who boycott apps with IAP...

Also, it seems to me that it's highly unlikely parents will ever notice this. Apple should add a popup for when you buy an app with IAP that says "This app contains In App Purchases" and have buttons for "Learn More", "Cancel", "Continue" and an on/off toggle for "Never Tell Me About this Again", if they truly want parents to learn about it.


Apple aren't going to mention the Lodsys lawsuits, or boycotting of apps in an education piece for consumers. And if you mean MacRumors should have mentioned it, I think if you're visiting this site it's likely you know about such things.

In regards to the popup, it just adds more clutter for something that a lot of people will ignore anyway. The people who are having the issues with kids racking up huge IAP purchases are not those who will read stuff like 'Learn More', in my experience.

[Experience: 4 years spent working in smartphone/mobile device retail]
Rating: 1 Votes
21 months ago

There's already been threads about this. I'm not going to engage in the same discussion.

http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=1560554&highlight=in-app

http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=1550535&highlight=in-app

http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=1548598&highlight=in-app


Yea, not gonna go into another thread.
Rating: 1 Votes
21 months ago

On devices running iOS 4.3 or later, you must enter your password to make an In-App Purchase. Once you enter your password to make that purchase, additional In-App Purchases can be made without reentering your password for 15 minutes.


On devices running iOS 4.3 or later, you must enter your password to make an ANY Purchase. Once you enter your password to make that purchase, additional In-App Purchases can be made without reentering your password for 15 minutes.


There, fixed it for Apple. Until they finally separate regular purchases from IAPs, that is.
Rating: 1 Votes
21 months ago

I disagree with your assessment and your tone.


Wait so its Apples fault a parent gives them a device with their information and not educate them?
Rating: 1 Votes

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