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Updated MacBook Pro to See Significant Performance Boost with Ivy Bridge

Amid swirling rumors of an imminent update for the 15-inch MacBook Pro driven by a claimed April 29 launch date for Intel's quad-core mobile Ivy Bridge processors, CPU World reports that benchmarking of one of the chips likely to appear in the new MacBook Pro shows fairly significant improvements in performance, particularly in graphics.

The chip being tested was the Core i7-3820QM, a 2.7 GHz processor with turbo speeds up to 3.7 GHz paired with Intel HD 4000 graphics. The chip is scheduled to debut with a price of $568 in high volume, and seems to be the natural successor to the Sandy Bridge Core i7-2860QM that is the current high-end processor for the 15-inch and 17-inch MacBook Pro, available as a build-to-order option.


For benchmarking comparisons, the new Ivy Bridge Core i7-3820QM chip was pitted against a Sandy Bridge Core i7-2960XM, which is an even higher-performance "Extreme" chip than is available in the current MacBook Pro. Consequently, any performance increase between the current high-end MacBook Pro chip and this new Ivy Bridge chip would be even greater than outlined in the benchmarking comparison.

Overall, the 3820QM was found to score an average of 9% higher than the Extreme 2960XM chip, a modest improvement but one which should be significantly higher relative to the 2860QM chip from the current MacBook Pro. Taking into account a roughly 10% higher performance for the tested 2960XM Sandy Bridge processor compared to the 2860QM actually found in the current MacBook Pro, the new 3820QM Ivy Bridge processor should offer roughly 20% higher CPU performance than is currently available in the MacBook Pro.
Looking at the CPU performance, using a few tests, we can see how the reduced production process helps the performance for a number of standard tests. In 3DMark Vantage (Entry level preset), Ivy Bridge has a 10% performance improvement over Sandy Bridge for the CPU score, and 9% in the physics score. In Cinebench 11.5, the single thread test showed a performance boost of 4%, and the multi-threaded test gave an improvement of 10%. The performance boost in the Truecrypt 7.0a - AES test was 4%. Finally, using x264 HD Benchmark 4.0, test 1 showed a boost of 13%, and test 2 showed a boost of 11%.
Even more significant gains for the Ivy Bridge chip show up in graphics performance, where the Intel HD 4000 integrated graphics supplants the HD 3000 graphics found in the Sandy Bridge chips. According to the benchmarks, the new HD 4000 integrated graphics outperforms the current graphics by anywhere from 32% to 108% depending on the test.

Apple of course also includes a dedicated graphics chip in its larger MacBook Pro models, giving users the option of higher performance with the dedicated chip or increased battery life with the integrated graphics. And given that the HD 4000 integrated graphics does not yet approach the performance of dedicated chips, those looking for maximum performance will still want to take advantage of whichever dedicated graphics option Apple includes in updated MacBook Pro models.

But significant improvements to integrated graphics performance could show up as a benefit in a number of areas, including providing users with better performance even when opting for the battery-conserving graphics settings. Apple has also reportedly been considering using integrated graphics only in some of its mid-range MacBook Pro models, with the HD 4000 chip making it feasible for the company to drop the dedicated graphics chip on some of those models while still being able to offer acceptable graphics performance.

Finally, the HD 4000 graphics will offer a marked improvement for the 13-inch MacBook Pro, which is expected to debut in June when Intel rolls out its dual-core Ivy Bridge processors. The smaller 13-inch form factor requires that those models rely solely on integrated graphics, meaning that all users would see a significant boost from the current HD 3000 graphics to the new HD 4000 graphics.

Top Rated Comments

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32 months ago
What I'm asking for is a better resolution (maybe a Retina display) with the anti-glare option and an SSD as the default data storage device (with the optical drive removed). With the new processor and graphic card it shouldn't be complicated to make it work.
That's it. Easy.
Rating: 31 Votes
32 months ago
Integrated graphics :(
Rating: 14 Votes
32 months ago
I wouldn't mind a 15" Pro with only the Intel HD 4000 graphics. I don't do any games or 3D programming, I'll take the extended battery life, less heat, and cheaper cost.
Rating: 13 Votes
32 months ago

there wont be a RETINA display for a 15inch notebook. u know how much that would make everything smaller????


HiDPI displays use the extra pixels to make everything clearer, not increase the real estate. Nothing would be smaller.
Rating: 12 Votes
32 months ago

Oh man i just bought a 13" MacBook Pro.


You're kidding.... is this your first time on MacRumors?
Rating: 11 Votes
32 months ago
Any chance this could come with the option of an Nvidia graphics card?
Rating: 10 Votes
32 months ago
That is seriously going to suck if they don't keep a dedicated graphic card in the 15" and 17". If that's the case I may be looking at a 13" MBA with a custom gaming pc.
Rating: 9 Votes
32 months ago

I've still got my 2006 15" 2.26 C2D, anyone have any idea what kind of processor performance boost (%) I'll likely get from the new 15" IB? If there is a 20% increase versus only the 2011 SB model, then I imagine it will be massive for me.


Likely an approximately fivefold increase in overall performance for you.
Rating: 8 Votes
32 months ago
it's ok guys. I will buy the current mbp now and knowing how things work, the new ones will be released right after.

taking one for the team
Rating: 8 Votes
32 months ago
I don't think 10-20% is a "significant" performance boost. Unless you're encoding x264 videos all day you probably won't notice any difference, infact a SSD would make a much bigger difference in most cases.

Anyway Ivy Bridge isn't about improving performance, this is Intel's tick (http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/silicon-innovations/intel-tick-tock-model-general.html) in it's cycle, so it's more about moving to a new process and increasing efficiency through a die shrink rather than performance gain with a new architecture. I wonder if there's a noticable increase in battery life with the new MacBook Pros, something which the current models struggle with.
Rating: 8 Votes

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