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Rumors of June Launch for Updated iMacs Begin to Build

Digitimes points to a report in Taiwan's Economic Daily News claiming that Apple is planning to introduce updated iMac models in June, a bit later than some had initially hoped given Intel's Ivy Bridge launch schedule that would see quad-core desktop processors launch at the end of this month.
PC ODM Quanta Computer and chassis supplier Foxconn Technology are expected to benefit from the launch of Apple's latest iMac desktops, which are set to launch in June with Intel's latest Ivy Bridge processors, according to a Chinese-language Economic Daily News (EDN) report citing sources from the upstream supply chain.
The report repeats a claim from earlier this week indicating that Apple will be using anti-reflective glass for the new iMac, and also suggests that updated MacBook Pro models are due "at the end of the second quarter".


Unfortunately, Economic Daily News does not have a terribly good track record when it comes to Apple rumors, with past misses including an iPhone nano in 2009, a 7-inch iPad in 2010, and a Retina-display iPad by the end of 2011. But perhaps coming in support of the newspaper's claim of a June launch for updated iMac models, How to Arena earlier this week claimed a similar June-July timeframe for updated iMac models.

As for Economic Daily News' claim that Apple will be releasing MacBook Pro updates at the end of the quarter, which would mean late June, Apple's situation appears to be complicated by chip availability from Intel. While quad-core chips appropriate for the 15-inch and 17-inch MacBook Pro are said to be launching on April 29, dual-core chips viewed as successors to those used in the current 13-inch model do not appear to be launching until early June.

Recent reports have indicated that production on new 15-inch models has begun ramping up but that 13-inch MacBook Pro updates won't begin ramping until June, and it is unclear whether Apple would introduce the new 15-inch models before the 13-inch models are ready.

Related roundup: iMac

Top Rated Comments

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35 months ago

I like my Macbook Pro. But I sold my 2011 iMac and built my own PC with the money I got from it. It is a lot more powerful, and upgradeable, as desktop computers should be. I feel like the iMac is a large notebook, and will continue that way. Before all the haters vote this down, think about this in regards to the iMac: The hard drive is not user replaceable, and besides the RAM, nothing is replaceable or upgradeable. So, here is my huge "no thanks" to Apple and the iMac.


That is the limitation of the all-in-one design, not just the iMac. Apple is not the only one who makes all-in-one desktops. So that argument could really be applied to an HP or Dell all-in-one. All-in-one's are not supposed to be easily upgradable, towers are. So you are comparing two very unlike terms. Considering multiple companies make all-in-one desktops, I do not know why you felt like singling out Apple.
Rating: 30 Votes
35 months ago


Unfortunately, Economic Daily News does not have a terribly good track record when it comes to Apple rumors, with past misses including an iPhone nano (http://www.macrumors.com/2009/01/13/iphone-nano-coming-in-june-but-not-to-united-states/) in 2009, a 7-inch iPad (http://www.macrumors.com/2010/08/17/7-inch-ipad-to-launch-by-christmas/) in 2010, and a Retina-display iPad (http://www.macrumors.com/2011/06/14/ipad-3-coming-this-year-with-2560x1920-resolution-display/) by the end of 2011.


So this is all moot.

I stopped reading after this
Rating: 30 Votes
35 months ago
Digitimes. I stopped reading there.
Rating: 27 Votes
35 months ago
Who cares, this is a family computer give me a Mac pro with 32 gb ram
Rating: 25 Votes
35 months ago
Give me my Mac Pro update. I made my career working on Macintosh workstations. These little i devices are fun and very useful, but we won't be able to buy them without the job the Mac workstations we use to make a paychecks!
Rating: 19 Votes
35 months ago
How on earth did that one news post go from iMac release dates to MacBook pro expectations?
Rating: 18 Votes
35 months ago

I like my Macbook Pro. But I sold my 2011 iMac and built my own PC with the money I got from it. It is a lot more powerful, and upgradeable, as desktop computers should be. I feel like the iMac is a large notebook, and will continue that way. Before all the haters vote this down, think about this in regards to the iMac: The hard drive is not user replaceable, and besides the RAM, nothing is replaceable or upgradeable. So, here is my huge "no thanks" to Apple and the iMac.


So why didn't you just get a Mac Pro?
Rating: 15 Votes
35 months ago

I like my Macbook Pro. But I sold my 2011 iMac and built my own PC with the money I got from it. It is a lot more powerful, and upgradeable, as desktop computers should be. I feel like the iMac is a large notebook, and will continue that way. Before all the haters vote this down, think about this in regards to the iMac: The hard drive is not user replaceable, and besides the RAM, nothing is replaceable or upgradeable. So, here is my huge "no thanks" to Apple and the iMac.


Why in the world would you upgrade a computer? I have owned numerous PCs and Macs and never in my life have I upgraded a computer (other than adding RAM). People love to tout the "upgradability" of PCs, but in reality, by the time you want to upgrade the video card (or some other component other than RAM), you really need a new motherboard, but then you need new faster RAM to take advantage of it, oh and while you're at it, you may as well get the new processor, and, and...oh, you just bought a new computer.

It's always better to just buy the new model and get ALL the technology improvements at once. Considering the high resale value of Macs, its cost effective too.
Rating: 13 Votes
35 months ago

That is the limitation of the all-in-one design, not just the iMac. Apple is not the only one who makes all-in-one desktops. So that argument could really be applied to an HP or Dell all-in-one. All-in-one's are not supposed to be easily upgradable, towers are. So you are comparing two very unlike terms. Considering multiple companies make all-in-one desktops, I do not know why you felt like singling out Apple.


Maybe because Apple has neglected their tower Mac Pro, focusing on iMac's, MacBook Pro's and iDevices while the other companies you have mentioned have not? Not meant to be sarcastic.

Personally, ever since Apple went to Intel processors in 2006 and dropped the affordable PowerMac's for Xeon based, expensive Mac Pro's, there is now a huge gap between the top model iMac and Mac Pro. A lot have been clamoring for a mid-tower system, perhaps with iMac guts but upgradable for businesses and professionals (and even power consumers) that cannot afford $2499+ for a base Mac Pro. I miss the days when PowerMac's began at ~$1500 price points with a choice of three CCFL LCD's.

A quick look at the back of an iMac disproves this:

Image (http://images.apple.com/imac/images/specs_connections20110505.jpg)


Those images don't relate to the point he made, and that is the guts of the system. As an ex-Genius, opening an iMac to replace/upgrade parts is extremely difficult and time consuming. Further, the graphics card is not upgradable, there are no PCIe slots for USB 3.0 (have a CalDigit in my Mac Pro), eSATA, etc. The RAM is about the only user upgradable aspect. My father has a current gen iMac and the 4 USB slots are already filled, requiring a USB hub with DC power plug. Thunderbolt is too expensive at the moment, the price of adding additional Thunderbolt drives, etc. you may as well get a Mac Pro with x4 SATA bays 2 extra SATA connections for optical and SSD connectivity, four PCIe slots, easy access to RAM and pretty much anything. :)
Rating: 12 Votes
35 months ago
the non reflective glass is all I care about - if they finally do that it would make our year.
Rating: 9 Votes

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