European Consumer Groups Criticize Apple's Warranties

Worldwide, all Apple hardware comes with a one-year warranty. On most products, that warranty can be extended to 2 or 3 years with AppleCare. However, in the European Union, the law requires manufacturers cover goods for two years.

Consumer groups in 11 countries -- comparable to Consumer Reports in the United States -- have sent a letters to national regulators asking for action against Apple regarding its warranty practices, reports Bloomberg.
“Consumers should not be misled and confused as to fundamental EU consumer rights because a company wants to sell their commercial warranty services,” Monique Goyens, director general of the European Consumer Organization, said in the statement. Goyens, who said consumers in the EU are entitled to a guarantee of at least two years, added the case is “even more important” as it concerns a market leader, whose practices have a “wide impact.”
Late last year, Apple was fined $1.2 million by Italian regulators over allegations that the company hadn't adequately disclosed the standard two-year warranty that is required by Italian law. Apple added disclosures to its Italian online store to address the court's concerns, but those have since been taken down. The appeal is due to be decided in Rome tomorrow.

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36 months ago

europe sounds like a bunch of pansies.

So in your view the people who stick up for their own rights are the "pansies?" Who are the tough guys in your mind? The folks who keep their humble mouths shut and meekly accept whatever they just happen to be given? Sounds like some screwy logic you have there pal.
Rating: 26 Votes
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36 months ago
All Apple products should come with a 3 year warranty standard for the prices they charge.
Rating: 25 Votes
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36 months ago

I didn't know that ownership of electronics was a "right."

I guess you DO learn something everyday. :cool:


It is not a right to own electronics. It is a right to expect a product to do the job it was advertised to do. Just because Apple sell luxary electronics, doesn't change the law, that the product should do what they said it should do, for a reasonable time.
Rating: 10 Votes
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36 months ago

I didn't know that ownership of electronics was a "right."

I guess you DO learn something everyday. :cool:


I think you need to learn how to read first, buddy.
Rating: 8 Votes
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36 months ago
In the US, they have the 1st year warranty built into the price of the product, and the 2nd/3rd year covered via AppleCare, right?

Can't they just build of the first two years of warranty into the price of the product in the EU? and have the 3rd year covered via AppleCare at a reduced cost?

.
Rating: 7 Votes
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36 months ago

You are covered by the distance selling regulations anyway in the UK. Even if my iPad develops a fault 3 years down the line, I could still dispute it under the regulations.


you mean Sales of Goods Act, the Distance Selling Regulations protects you from unsatisfactory products for 14 days when you buy something online or by telephone.

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I agree, when I brought my faulty MBP to the Apple Store less than 2 years after purchase, I was told I'd have to pay about £600 to replace the motherboard. I told them that there is a law that says that computer manufacturers should have a 2-year warranty (or is it 3?), and they didn't seem to care at all, so I'm stuck with a faulty computer ever since...


I'm guessing you're in the UK, in that case we have never adopted the '2 year warranty' law, you should have used the Sales of Goods Act which states a product should last a satisfactory amount of time and you are protected for (within reason) 6 years. I would say a laptop computer should last longer than 2 years so you should have been covered.
Rating: 7 Votes
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36 months ago
Thanks to the 2 year mandatory warranty in the EU, I didn't have to pay to get the faulty GPU replaced on my 2008 MBP.

Advertising 1 year warranty is actually pretty pathetic for a "premium" company like Apple. 3 years would be appropriate. Eizo even gives 5 years.
Rating: 7 Votes
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36 months ago

So Europe will pay more for their Apple electronics. That's life.


Not going to happen. There are a number of reasons why Apple keep their prices pretty much in line across the globe. If there are additional costs such as this it will just be worked in to a higher price for everyone.

Don't get why so many outside the EU think this is a bad thing. Apple charge a premium for their products, expecting them to last more than 12 months isn't asking much. If it does become a problem Apple always have the option of increasing the quality of their product to match the price tag.

The EU warranty law protects the consumers, it's everyone outside the EU that is getting shafted by Apple's 12 month warranty.
Rating: 7 Votes
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36 months ago

That's even better, but then how do you get Apple to respect the Sales of Goods Act? They generally turn you away after your 1-year warranty expires, saying that you'll have to pay for the repairs. What can you do?


You can call Trading Standards. The other option is a small court claim, which isn't as scary as it sounds and there are plenty of websites to get advice from. Chances are Apple wouldn't even respond to the court claim and would lose by default or would settle before hand.

The issue at dispute in the UK is how long the warranty should be, as all the law says is words to the effect of a suitable length of time for the product. But given the price of Apple products and that they are high end I really don't think arguing a two year warranty is that difficult.

Though another good option is to buy Apple products from John Lewis as they give a two year warranty on all computers.
Rating: 6 Votes
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36 months ago

I agree with the criticism to an extent- Apple (and other sellers) should make it clearer that extended warranties are sometimes not necessary and there is often still recourse for consumers without them. Moreover, they should make their staff aware of the statutory consumer protection laws so you don't have to threaten to start legal proceedings to get something done!


Their staff know the law, it's all part of the game they play. Returns cost money and they'll push things as much as they can to avoid them, how far they'll go depends on the retailer.

I've read of plenty of people challenging Apple over not providing a two year warranty and I don't remember a single one that didn't end in Apple giving in or losing. Though Apple always say they're doing it as a gesture of goodwill rather than the law.
Rating: 6 Votes
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