Rdio


'Rdio' Articles

Rdio to Officially Shut Down on December 22, Will Allow Users to Download Collection Archive

Last month Pandora announced that it acquired "key assets" and employees from Rdio for $75 million. Tonight, Rdio began emailing its users to let them know that it would officially shut down on December 22, 2015 at 5 p.m. PST. Rdio will also let its former subscribers download an archive of their favorite music and playlists in various formats so that they can import them into their new music streaming service of choice. The service also created a timeline that allows users to see their "life on Rdio", including a user's most played song and album and the first playlist they created. The streaming service also shared its own timeline. Rdio revealed that its first subscriber signed up on August 3, 2010, that the first played song was Katy Perry's "California Girls", the most played album was Drake's "Nothing Was The Same", the most played song was Bruno Mars' "When I Was Your Man", the most popular playlist was Dave Novak's "1000 (April 2015)" and the company's favorite comment was "Very touching tribute to turning things down for reasons we forget," regarding DJ Snake and Lil Jon's "Turn Down For What." On its export page, Rdio says the files it's allowing users to download are metadata that'll make it easier for users to restore their collections in their next music streaming service. It also points users to Soundiiz and StAMP, two services that allow users to directly transfer their collections to their next music streaming service. Finally, Rdio warns that it doesn't know when its exporting website will go down, so users should download their collections as

Pandora Acquires 'Key Assets' and Employees From Rdio for $75 Million

Two of the biggest Apple Music competitors and most notable names in the streaming music industry are joining forces, with Pandora today announcing its $75 million acquisition of "key assets" from Rdio. According to a press release on the acquisition, Pandora has gained unspecified "technology and intellectual property," and a number of Rdio's employees will be given roles at Pandora. Pandora plans to use Rdio's assets to "offer fans greater control over the music they love," with an expanded Pandora listening experience set to launch in late 2016, depending on licensing. Pandora wants to become the "go-to destination" for wherever and however its fans want to listen to music. "The Rdio team built an acclaimed product and technology platform that has consistently led innovation in the young streaming industry. I'm pleased that many members of the Rdio team will continue to shape the future of streaming music, applying our tradition of great design and innovative engineering on an even larger stage with Pandora," said Anthony Bay, chief executive officer of Rdio.Pandora has more than 80 million users and continues to be one of the most popular streaming music services. Pandora offers its users the ability to listen to free, ad-supported radio stations centered around particular artists or songs rather than offering on-demand listening like Apple Music. Rdio offered a similar ad-supported free listening tier, but it also included Rdio Unlimited, a service that let users listen to any song on demand as is possible with Spotify and Apple Music. With its acquisition of

Rdio Will Launch $3.99 Streaming Tier as Apple's Streaming Service Approaches

Rdio is planning to launch a new streaming tier for $3.99 a month with specific limitations this Thursday, according to BuzzFeed. The news comes as Apple's new streaming service, a rebranded version of Beats Music that may be called Apple Music, gears up to launch next month. Rdio says the service, called Rdio Select, will include two components: 1) Pandora-like streaming radio stations, without ads, and with the ability to skip ahead as often as you want, and 2) daily access to 25 songs of your choosing. Subscribers will be able to download the 25 songs and replace some or all (or none) of them each day, so long as the number doesn’t exceed 25.Anthony Bay, Rdio's CEO, tells BuzzFeed that they chose 25 songs because it's "more than most users download in a day". He goes on to note that it also allows the company to not lose money at the price of $4 a month, saying that the company agrees with artist Taylor Swift that on-demand playback of music should not be free. The move, according to Rdio, is an attempt to tap into a market that doesn't feel ready to pay $9.99 a month for streaming music. Similar to Rdio, Apple's new music streaming service will not offer a free tier. Apple plans on charging $9.99 a month for the service, which will have a focus on curated content. Apple's original plans for its new streaming service planned on, like Rdio, undercutting $9.99-a-month streaming services. Apple had reportedly wanted to offer its service for $5 a month and then $7.99 a month before backing down after resistance from record labels. Earlier today, it was reported

Apple's iTunes Radio, Beats, and Others Hit With Unpaid Royalty Suits Over Pre-1972 Music

Following a lengthy lawsuit that pitted Sirius XM Radio against members of classic rock band The Turtles in a fight over royalties for music recordings made before 1972, new class action lawsuits have been filed against Apple, Sony, Google, and Rdio over their streaming music services (via The Recorder). As noted by Law360, Beats Music has also been hit with a suit. According to the suits, filed yesterday by Zenbu Magazines Inc., streaming services like iTunes Radio, Beats, and Google Play Music have been making money off of pre-1972 music recordings without paying any royalties to the owners of the original recordings. Zenbu owns the copyrights to many songs in question and is represented by The Law Office of Jack Fitzgerald in San Diego. The lawsuit seeks to create a certified "class of all owners of recordings made before February 15, 1972, whose recordings appear on streaming services."While musical compositions have been protected under U.S. copyright law since 1831, sound recordings were only added to the federal copyright act in 1972. That's meant that the holders of copyrights to pre-1972 compositions—largely music publishers—have been paid royalties for public performances while those holding the copyrights to recordings—largely record labels—have not.As noted by The Recorder, last year a judge in Los Angeles decided to extend ownership rights for pre-1972 recordings to include public performances. Similarly, in that case of Sirius XM versus owners of the sound recordings made by The Turtles in the 1960s, U.S. District Judge Philip Gutierrez ruled against