Oculus Rift


'Oculus Rift' Articles

Standalone VR Headset 'Oculus Go' Now Available for Purchase for $199

During the F8 Facebook Developer Conference this morning, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced the launch of the Oculus Go, the latest virtual reality headset from Oculus, which is owned by Facebook. Priced at $199, the Oculus Go is Oculus' first standalone VR headset, which Zuckerberg said represents the "first really affordable standalone virtual reality headset." It's shipping with more than 1,000 apps, and it features the "highest quality lenses and optics" that Oculus has ever built into a VR device. Given its affordable price point, Zuckerberg says that it'll be the "easiest way to get into VR," and that the company expects this is how many people will experience virtual reality for the first time. Design wise, the Oculus Go looks similar to the Oculus Rift. It's a VR headset that fits over the eyes and attaches to the head with adjustable straps and breathable fabrics. It is a standalone device, which means it does not require a connection to a computer or a gaming system to operate. Oculus Go features a 5.5-inch display with a 2560 x 1440 resolution (1280 x 1140 per eye) and it runs using Qualcomm's Snapdragon 821 processor. There are spatial audio drivers built into the headset to provide immersive sound, but it also includes a 3.5mm headphone jack to allow users to connect headphones if desired. The included controller translates natural movements into VR using a touch surface and a trigger button. In a review, The Verge said that while the Oculus Go is not the "flashiest or most high-tech" headset on the market, it's the "best that simple

Oculus Rift Support for Macs Not 'Currently on the Roadmap'

Oculus co-founder Nate Mitchell recently sat down with TechCrunch for an interview discussing the future of the Oculus Rift, where he said that while Mac support is something the company would like to implement, it's not currently in the works. According to Mitchell, while Mac support is "near-and-dear" to his heart, Oculus is "just not quite there yet." Mac integration is, in fact, so far off that it's not even on the Oculus roadmap for the next six months. "We do want to do OS X (macOS) support for Rift, it's not something that's currently on the roadmap for-- I can even say-- the next six months," Mitchell tells me. "We will continue to revisit it, the real challenge for us is just how much we invest into that space because it does require a lot of our time and energy to get it right and to deliver a great experience."Early versions of the Oculus Rift did work with some higher-end Mac machines, but during the product's development period, Oculus was forced to drop Mac support. Mac development was put on hold in order to focus on "delivering a high quality consumer-level VR experience," on Windows machines with more robust hardware. Last year, Oculus founder Palmer Luckey made headlines when he said the Oculus Rift wouldn't offer Mac support until Apple releases a "good computer." He said Oculus Rift support was ultimately "up to Apple," and that the company needed to "prioritize higher-end GPUs." Hardware requirements for the Rift became less stringent in October thanks to software advancements and will now run on any machine equipped with an Nvidia 960 or

Oculus Rift Won't Support Mac Until Apple Releases a 'Good Computer'

During a recent Xbox press event, ShackNews had an opportunity to speak with Oculus VR founder Palmer Luckey and asked him whether the company plans to implement Mac support for the Oculus Rift virtual reality headset. In response to the question, Luckey said Oculus Rift support for the Mac was "up to Apple," and that the company needed to "prioritize higher-end GPUs." If Apple builds a machine that can handle the hardware, Oculus VR would "love to support Mac." That is up to Apple and if they ever release a good computer we will do it. It just boils down to the fact that Apple doesn't prioritize high-end GPUs. You can a buy $6,000 Mac Pro with the top of the line AMD FirePro D700s and it still doesn't match our recommended spec. If they prioritize higher-end GPUs like they used to for awhile back in the day I think we'd love to support Mac. Right now there's just not a single machine out there that supports it so even if we can support it on the software side there's just no audience of people that can run the vast majority of software out there.The Oculus Rift, which is available for pre-order, will begin shipping out later this month to PC users. While Mac support was planned early on, work on a Mac version was halted once it became clear Mac machines would not have the graphics capabilities to power the headset. As Luckey mentions, the Oculus Rift requires a computer with a powerful GPU. Oculus VR's recommended specs for the Rift include an NVIDIA GTX 970, AMD 290, or equivalent, because the Oculus Rift needs to render approximately 400 million shaded

Oculus Rift Development on OS X 'Paused' to Focus on Strong Windows Launch

Following the acquisition of Oculus by Facebook last year, not much news came out regarding the virtual reality headset's availability to its non-developer fanbase. Recently, however, Oculus confirmed the Rift will be up for pre-order later this year, with the first units shipping sometime in the first quarter of 2016. A glimpse inside the consumer model of the Oculus Rift Atman Binstock, Chief Architect at Oculus and technical director of the Rift, today wrote a blog post on the company's website providing more details on the exact rig configuration PC players can expect to need when playing games on the Rift. Towards the end of the blog, Binstock also notes that development for the Rift on both Mac and Linux has "paused" to deliver as strong a launch as possible on the headset's sole platform - Windows. "Our development for OS X and Linux has been paused in order to focus on delivering a high quality consumer-level VR experience at launch across hardware, software, and content on Windows. We want to get back to development for OS X and Linux but we don’t have a timeline." The Rift has had a long and bumpy road ever since it was introduced in 2012 with a developer kit version being sold both on the company's website and as a $300 reward tier on its widely known Kickstarter campaign. Ever since, the Rift has shown up at numerous gaming conventions and electronics shows, but not until this year was any sort of hint given concerning when a mass-marketed consumer version would finally be available. Although the lengthy development process for the Oculus Rift is more