Miitomo


'Miitomo' Articles

Nintendo Announces Plans to Shut Down 'Miitomo' Two Years After Launch

Nintendo launched its first iOS mobile game, Miitomo, in March 2016, and this week the company has confirmed it will officially end support for the game on May 9, 2018 (via The Verge). The company posted a notice [Google Translate] on its Japanese website yesterday, warning Miitomo users of its decision to "terminate the service" on Wednesday, May 9 at 12:00 a.m. (PDT). Ahead of that closure, the company has already ended the sale of "Miitomo coins" through in-app purchases as of today, but coins and game tickets will be given to players as a login bonus so they can shop for items until May 9. In the lead-up to that date, Miitomo will hold "The Final Thank You Festival" with events that celebrate its fans through daily bonuses and sharing Miifotos on Twitter. Then, in the early morning of May 9 all of Miitomo's features will become inaccessible, including Miifotos, messages, and sidekick Miis. Head to Nintendo's website for more information on how to save some of the app's data before it closes. Nintendo apologized to customers who are fans of the app, and noted that it will issue a refund of unused Miitomo coins purchased through IAPs. The refunds will appear after termination this May. We recently decided to terminate the service on May 9, 2018 (Wednesday) on the application "Miitomo" for smartphones which started distribution on March 17, 2016. We are sorry for the customers who have enjoyed it, thank you for your understanding. As Nintendo's first game for iOS and Android devices, Miitomo was a social networking style game that allowed players to create

New Data Suggests 'Users Didn't Really Get Miitomo,' Leading to its Decline

After a few weeks of news surrounding Nintendo's continued push into smartphone gaming, the company's first app -- Miitomo -- slowly started to disappear from the conversation as users began to abandon the app. Nintendo celebrated an impressive 10 million user downloads a few weeks after Miitomo's release, but since then little news or talk has been circling from Nintendo itself or the game's original downloaders. A new report by SurveyMonkey attempts to drill down to the reasoning behind Miitomo's rise and fall, which occurred all in the span of about two months. To do so, the site compared Miitomo to King's Candy Crush Saga and Supercell's Clash of Clans, two games which not only debuted big, but kept players engaged frequently on a week-by-week basis. All three games had a similar huge download spike at launch, with Candy Crush Saga topping the charts, followed by a downturn in downloads in the subsequent weeks. The difference between the games is that those belonging to King and Supercell saw continued user engagement by the gamers who originally downloaded them. According to SurveyMonkey's numbers, Clash Royale is played on average 4.2 days per week by its users, while Candy Crush Saga is played 3.3 days each week. Miitomo, on the other hand, sees users returning just 2.3 days per week. The site's leading theory on this low return rate statistic is a fanbase that "didn't really get Miitomo." In Miitomo’s case, this lower-than-peers engagement translates into higher churn. The game’s weekly churn more than 50% means that over half of the users of Miitomo