diversity


'diversity' Articles

Apple Publishes New Diversity and Inclusion Report

Apple today shared its latest report on diversity and inclusion, detailing its hiring practices over the course of the last year. According to Apple, from July 2016 to July 2017, half of all new hires were from "historically underrepresented groups in tech," including women, black, Hispanic, Native American, Native Hawaiian, and Other Pacific Islander. 25% of new hires in 2016/2017 were Asian, 11% Black, 15% Hispanic, 4% multiracial, and 43% White. As of 2017, Apple employees, including retail and tech, are 68 percent male and 32 percent female. 21% are Asian, 9% are black, 12% are Hispanic, 3% are multiracial, and 54% are white. Apple's tech only and leadership only breakdowns continue to skew more heavily towards white and male, however. Female representation is "steadily increasing" and is up 5 percent since 2014. 36 percent of Apple employees under 30 are women, and 32 percent overall are women. Apple says that 29 percent of "leaders" at Apple are women, a one percent increase since July of 2016. Apple says that "meaningful change takes time," but with 130,000 employees, even "small percentage point changes" have the potential to affect thousands of people. A two percent increase in female representation since 2014 equates to 37,000 female hires across the globe. Further breakdowns of the diversity at Apple are available through Apple's updated Inclusion and Diversity website. Other topics on the site include education, programs for veterans, pay equity, accessibility, LGBTQ advocacy, and supplier programs. Apple says it's proud of its current

Apple's Workforce is Slightly More Diverse This Year

Apple has released updated diversity numbers that reveal its overall workforce, including tech, non-tech, and retail jobs, is 68% male and 32% female as of June 2016, a slight change from a 69%-31% split in 2015. Apple profiled some of these employees, including Divya, Ryan, Adrienne, Aurelio, Edith, Riad, Charissa, and Kully, and shared a Creating Opportunities page highlighting its diversity programs and partnerships. Denise Young Smith, Vice President of Worldwide Human Resources at Apple:"Diversity is more than any one gender, race, or ethnicity. It's richly representative of all people, all backgrounds, and all perspectives. It is the entire human experience."Apple's race and ethnicity breakdown among U.S. employees is 19% Asian, 9% Black, 12% Hispanic, 2% Multiracial, 1% Other, and 56% White, representing a 2 percent increase in White employees and a 1 percent increase in both Asian and Hispanic employees compared to last year's data. Females represent 37% of Apple's global new hires, while U.S. underrepresented minorities represent 27% of global new hires. Apple defines underrepresented minorities as "groups whose representation in tech has been historically low — Black, Hispanic, Native American, Native Hawaiian, and Other Pacific Islander." Apple said that it has achieved pay equity in the United States for similar roles and performance as of August 2016. The company said female employees earn one dollar for every dollar male employees earn, while underrepresented minorities earn one dollar for every dollar white employees earn.We see diversity as

Apple's U.S. Workforce Continues to Diversify Per Latest Federal Data

Apple has shared its most recently filed Federal Employer Information Report EEO-1, providing a breakdown of the company's U.S. workforce as of August 2015. AppleInsider first spotted the document over the weekend. The employment data reveals that Apple is slightly more diverse compared to its previous July 2014 report, hiring 1,475 African-American or Black employees, 1,633 Hispanics or Latinos and 1,662 Asians over a 13-month period. The latest EEO-1 data contradicts Apple's public-facing diversity page, which said the company hired 2,200 Black employees, a 65% increase over the previous year, and 2,700 Hispanic employees, a 50% year-over-year increase, based on August 2015 data. It is unclear what is causing the discrepancy between the data, but Apple claims its own diversity numbers are "far more accurate" than EEO-1 data.We make the document publicly available, but it’s not how we measure our progress. The EEO-1 has not kept pace with changes in industry or the American workforce over the past half century. We believe the information we report elsewhere on this site is a far more accurate reflection of our progress toward diversity.Apple's U.S. workforce continues to be overwhelmingly white and male, especially at the executive and senior official level. EEO-1 data shows Apple had 31,135 white male employees as of August 2015, representing about 43% of its U.S. workforce. At WWDC 2015, CEO Tim Cook said Apple is a "better company" by being more diverse. Note: Due to the political nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is

Apple Releases New Diversity Numbers, Hired Over 11,000 Women in Past Year

Apple has released updated diversity numbers that provide a breakdown of the company's workforce based on gender, race and ethnicity in 2015. The new data reveals that Apple hired over 11,000 women globally over the past year, a 65% increase over the previous year, in addition to 2,200 Black employees, a 50% year-over-year increase, and 2,700 Hispanic employees, a 66% increase over the previous year. Apple says that is has hired more diverse candidates in 2015 than any year to date, with the percentage of new hires in the past year broken down as follows: 35% Women (Global), 19% Asian (U.S.), 13% Hispanic (U.S.), 11% Black (U.S.). Apple's global gender split is now 69% male and 31% female, a marginal change from last year's 70% male-30% female split. Apple CEO Tim Cook:Diversity is critical to innovation and it is essential to Apple’s future. We aspire to do more than just make our company as diverse as the talent available to hire. We must address the broad underlying challenges, offer new opportunities, and create a future generation of employees as diverse as the world around us. We also aspire to make a difference beyond Apple. [...] We are proud of the progress we’ve made, and our commitment to diversity is unwavering. But we know there is a lot more work to be done. Some people will read this page and see our progress. Others will recognize how much farther we have to go. We see both. And more important than these statistics, we see tens of thousands of Apple employees all over the world, speaking dozens of languages, working together. We

Apple Now Awarding Up to 350 WWDC Scholarships for Students

Apple will award up to 350 students and developers belonging to select STEM organizations that promote diversity with scholarships to attend its recently announced Worldwide Developers Conference next June 8 to 12 in San Francisco, as spotted by Re/code. The company previously limited WWDC scholarships to 200 students and developers at past conferences, and is raising that limit in an effort to promote diversity within the developer community. WWDC scholarships are available to students aged 13 or older and members of participating organizations around the world that promote science, technology, engineering and math education for young women and other ethnic groups. Apple awards selected students with a free WWDC ticket, normally $1,599, and may cover travel and accommodation costs at its discretion. All other expenses incurred during the trip must be covered by the student. WWDC scholarship submissions, including a Mac or iOS app, can be made April 22 at 10:00 AM PDT through April 26 at 5:00 PM PDT, and all applicants will be notified about their selection status by May 8. Apple specifies that developers between 13-17 years of age must have their submission completed by their parent or guardian. Eligible students can read Apple's WWDC Scholarships page and WWDC Scholarship Guidelines and Terms for more information. Note: Due to the controversial nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Politics, Religion, Social Issues forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting

Apple Donates Over $50 Million to Increase Diversity in the Tech Industry

Apple's annual shareholders meeting is currently underway at the company's headquarters in Cupertino, California, and one big item on the agenda, according to Apple’s human resources chief Denise Young Smith, is a plan to partner with a few non-profit organizations on an effort to bring more women, minorities, and veterans into the tech industry (via Fortune). The deal is said to be a multi-year effort worth $50 million, and to start off, Apple is partnering with the Thurgood Marshall College Fund, a non-profit which focuses on supporting students enrolled in "historically black colleges and universities." The two will work together in expanding the role of minorities in the field, with Apple planning to donate over $40 million to the organization. “Historically, other organizations have provided scholarship dollars or focused on whatever area matters most to them,” says Johnny Taylor, president and CEO of the Thurgood Marshall College Fund. “What differentiates this partnership with Apple is that it hits on everything that we do—it is the most comprehensive program ever offered to an HBCU organization.” The company will partner with a separate, female-focused non-profit, the National Center for Women and Information Technology, to help with increasing the presence of women in the field. Apple will donate $10 million to the fund, with a four year plan to double recipients of the organization's scholarships and internship programs. Tim Cook will allow Rev. Jesse Jackson a few moments to speak during the shareholder meeting taking place today, and USA Today met