Apple Heart Study


'Apple Heart Study' Articles

Apple Watch Heart Study Involved 400,000 Participants

Stanford Medicine has published more details about the future of the Heart Study program it conducted in partnership with Apple, in which it attempted to reliably detect atrial fibrillation in Apple Watch wearers. The condition, which is characterized by an irregular heartbeat, often remains hidden because many people don't experience symptoms. Atrial fibrillation can increase the risk of stroke and heart failure. According to Stanford, the study involved 400,000 participants, making it the the largest screening program for atrial fibrillation ever conducted. A paper has also been published in the American Heart Journal describing the unique design of the clinical trial. Enrollment began in late 2017 and closed in August. Although some participants were informed in September that their participation in the study was complete, Stanford says it will continue to collect and collate data until early next year, which is consistent with Apple's original announcement. "We hope this study will help us better understand how wearable technologies can inform precision health," said Lloyd Minor, MD, dean of the School of Medicine. "These new tools, which have the potential to predict, prevent and manage disease, are finally within our reach."The FDA cleared two Apple Watch medical apps in September. One app uses data from the Apple Watch Series 4 to take an ECG by touching the button on the side of the device. The second app uses data from an optical sensor available on the Apple Watch Series 1 and later to analyze pulse data and

Apple Heart Study Ends for Some Early Participants Ahead of January Completion Date

Over the weekend, Apple informed some users who signed up to its Apple Watch Heart Study that their contributions were complete. An app notification thanked them for their participation and asked them to complete an exit-survey about the study, which first launched in November 2017. The study in collaboration with Stanford Medicine was offered to anyone in the United States who was 22 years older with an iPhone 5s or later and an Apple Watch Series 1 or later. Atrial fibrillation, a common form of heart arrhythmia that is covered in the study, can indicate serious medical conditions like heart failure and stroke. Participants were instructed to download and install the Apple Heart Study app and wear their Apple Watch. When an irregular heart beat is detected, a consultation with a Study Telehealth provider from American Well is offered, with some people asked to wear an ePatch monitor for up to seven days for further investigation. Apple closed the study to new participants at the beginning of last month. In a prior announcement, Apple said the study would not end until January 1, 2019, but it looks as though the participants who received the notifications over the weekend all enrolled early, suggesting that data collection is winding down over stages as the end date approaches. Rumors have suggested that 2018 Apple Watch Series 4 models will include enhanced heart rate detection features that could improve the smartwatch's ability to detect diseases linked to higher heart rates and abnormal heart rhythms, but what form the enhanced heart rate features

Apple Closes Apple Watch Heart Rate Study to New Participants

Apple and Stanford University's School of Medicine are no longer allowing new participants to join the joint heart rate study that they're conducting using data gathered from the heart rate monitor of the Apple Watch, according to an updated notice on the Apple Heart Study website. As of August 1, 2018, an enrollment termination date Apple and Stanford first announced when the study launched, enrollment is officially closed. While enrollment has ended, the study does not end until January 31, 2019, and Apple plans to continue collecting data from current participants until the completion of the study. Note: Enrollment for this study is closed to new participants as of August 1, 2018. If you are currently enrolled, your participation will continue until the end of the study.The Apple Heart Study is designed to use data from the Apple Watch to identify irregular heart rhythms to determine whether the wrist-worn device can accurately detect life-threatening conditions like atrial fibrillation. The study was previously open to anyone in the United States who was 22 years older with an iPhone 5s or later and an Apple Watch Series 1 or later. Participants were instructed to download and install the Apple Heart Study app and wear the Apple Watch. When an irregular heart beat is detected in a study participant, a consultation with a Study Telehealth provider from American Well is offered, with some people asked to wear an ePatch monitor for up to seven days for further investigation. One MacRumors reader shared his story using the Heart Rate Study app and the

Apple Watch Owners Can Participate in Apple Heart Study to Identify Irregular Heart Rhythms

Apple today announced it has launched a ResearchKit-based Apple Heart Study app, which uses the Apple Watch's heart rate sensor to collect data on irregular heart rhythms and notify users who may be experiencing atrial fibrillation. As part of the study, if an irregular heart rhythm is identified, participants will receive a notification on their Apple Watch and iPhone, a free consultation with a study doctor and an electrocardiogram (ECG) patch for additional monitoring."Every week we receive incredible customer letters about how Apple Watch has affected their lives, including learning that they have AFib. These stories inspire us and we're determined to do more to help people understand their health," said Jeff Williams, Apple's COO. "Working alongside the medical community, not only can we inform people of certain health conditions, we also hope to advance discoveries in heart science."To calculate heart rate and rhythm, the Apple Watch's sensor uses green LED lights flashing hundreds of times per second and light-sensitive photodiodes to detect the amount of blood flowing through the wrist. Apple is partnering with Stanford University's School of Medicine to perform the research."Through the Apple Heart Study, Stanford Medicine faculty will explore how technology like Apple Watch's heart rate sensor can help usher in a new era of proactive health care central to our Precision Health approach," said Lloyd Minor, Dean of Stanford University School of Medicine. "We're excited to work with Apple on this breakthrough heart study."While heart arrhythmias aren't