Apple Stops Signing iOS 12 Following iOS 12.0.1 Launch

Following the release of iOS 12.0.1 on October 8, Apple has stopped signing iOS 12, the previous version of iOS that was available to consumers.

iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch owners who have upgraded to iOS 12.0.1 will no longer be able to downgrade to the release version of iOS 12. iOS 12.0.1 introduced fixes for a Lightning charging issue and Wi-Fi problems, improving performance over iOS 12.

Apple routinely stops signing older versions of software updates after new releases come out in order to encourage customers to keep their operating systems up to date.

iOS 12.0.1 is now the only version of iOS that can be installed on iPhones and iPads by the general public. Developers and public beta testers can download iOS 12.1, an iOS 12 update that's being beta tested.



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9 months ago
I’m so impressed by iOS 12 and macOS 10.14, I haven’t even felt the need to downgrade to an earlier version.
Rating: 5 Votes
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9 months ago

Rarely do they even impact more than a double-digit percentage of people. If they did, they'd be national news.


lol... you mean 100%?
Rating: 5 Votes
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9 months ago
I'm impressed with IOS 12 because, unlike last year, they aren't having to patch it every week.
Rating: 5 Votes
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9 months ago

I'm impressed with IOS 12 because, unlike last year, they aren't having to patch it every week.

And at the same time there are plenty of posts with people experiencing this or that who are hoping that updates will be released as soon as possible to get those resolved for them. So there are definitely things to patch, as there always are essentially, just that releases aren't being pushed out as often/quickly.
Rating: 4 Votes
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9 months ago

And at the same time there are plenty of posts with people experiencing this or that who are hoping that updates will be released as soon as possible to get those resolved for them. So there are definitely things to patch, as there always are essentially, just that releases aren't being pushed out as often/quickly.


There will always be that. There are hundreds of millions of iOS devices out there.

Remember that these problems are generally impacting only a small percentage of the users. Rarely do they even impact more than a double-digit percentage of people. If they did, they'd be national news. We're not talking MacRumors reports but New York Times/USA Today reports if something like battery drain was happening on a wide-scale. Every large news outlet knows that stories about Apple bring far more viewership than others like Microsoft, so they're hoping for something that can be really newsworthy for them.

Research has shown that online forums like this make problems appear bigger than they generally are. You see a thread with even a couple hundred replies about a problem and think it's widespread. What you don't consider is that that's just a couple hundred people, out of hundreds of millions of devices. You'd be talking less than 0.001% of users impacted. On top of that, you have no way of telling how many of those replies are multiple posts from the same couple people. So even a post with 1000 replies often turns out to be largely due to several individuals, rather than 1000 people with a problem.

Just something to consider when thinking about problems with iOS. All in all, it's pretty well done. There will always be some people with issues, as with every single operating system out there. But for the vast majority of us, things are pretty darn good.
Rating: 3 Votes
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9 months ago
Apple didn't read my post about changing the package icon.
Rating: 2 Votes
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9 months ago

There will always be that. There are hundreds of millions of iOS devices out there.

Remember that these problems are generally impacting only a small percentage of the users. Rarely do they even impact more than a double-digit percentage of people.


I don’t disagree with any of this. But even a small percentage of users is a lot of people given the popularity of iOS devices. I have at least two issues with iOS 12. One is very annoying. My issue is Apple controls the hardware and software, and they have a very limited array of devices they have to support.
Rating: 1 Votes
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9 months ago

I don’t disagree with any of this. But even a small percentage of users is a lot of people given the popularity of iOS devices. I have at least two issues with iOS 12. One is very annoying. My issue is Apple controls the hardware and software, and they have a very limited array of devices they have to support.

I'd say that it's not a very limited array of devices, especially if you factor in variety of models for each type of device, and variety of configurations and ways that people use their devices. There are plenty combinations and possibilities in play. It doesn't mean that it's as hard as it is for those who don't control the hardware too, but it's certainly not really as simplistic as something like "very limited array" makes it sound.
Rating: 1 Votes
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9 months ago

I'd say that it's not a very limited array of devices, especially if you factor in variety of models for each type of device, and variety of configurations and ways that people use their devices. There are plenty combinations and possibilities in play. It doesn't mean that it's as hard as it is for those who don't control the hardware too, but it's certainly not really as simplistic as something like "very limited array" makes it sound.


To me it is limited compared to many others. Certainly it is nothing compared to what MSFT and Linux have to contend with.
Rating: 1 Votes
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