Hulu Introduces Ad-Free Subscription Plan for $12 a Month

Hulu today revealed a new plan option that will grant subscribers immunity from the service's embedded advertisements by paying $11.99 each month instead of the traditional $7.99 (via Re/code). Available for new and existing users, Hulu's CEO Mike Hopkins notes that it took months for the various companies and providers available on the service to support the new subscription tier, but he still expects a "solid majority" of people to stick with the $7.99 option.

hulu new plan
Hopkins says getting the various rights owners for the Hulu catalog — which includes TV shows from NBC, ABC and Fox, as well as stuff from other networks, plus movies (note the Epix deal it just signed), plus stuff Hulu is creating on its own — to agree to the ad-free option took months.

Hulu is jointly owned by Disney, 21st Century Fox and Comcast’s NBCUniversal, and those companies are heavily invested in the business of selling TV ads. Hulu won’t come out and say this out loud, but the 50 percent price jump between the two versions is meant to give most of Hulu’s 9 million subscribers a reason to keep the version they have, and not hasten the erosion of the ad model.
A slight negative for some will come in the new tier's "exception shows," which will present users with bookended ads even when a subscriber is paying $12 per month. From ABC, NBC, and FOX, the seven exception shows are: New Girl, Scandal, How to Get Away with Murder, Grey’s Anatomy, Once Upon a Time, Marvel's Agents of Shield, and Grimm. Perhaps a minor silver lining: the exception shows won't include the timed ads in the middle of a video and will only include a 15-second pre-show and 30-second post-show commercial.

Users interested in signing up for Hulu Plus, or changing their current subscription to the new option, can do so over on Hulu's official website. The Hulu app is also available to download free from the App Store [Direct Link].

Tag: Hulu


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52 months ago
Wow, even the ad-free tier has ads. Brilliant.
Rating: 18 Votes
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52 months ago
Pay $8 and you get ads?
Pay $12 and you still get ads?

This is as bad a deal as cable TV. It makes no freaking sense. Either give it to me for free with ads, or name your price and give it to me ad-free. Paying and still being subjected to ads is beyond ridiculous.
Rating: 18 Votes
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52 months ago
$4 more for no ads? Yes please!
Rating: 9 Votes
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52 months ago
"exception shows"? All set to pay more until I read that phrase.
Rating: 9 Votes
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52 months ago
"No commercials" should mean no commercials. There can't be any exception if users are willing to pay higher price. I'm just glad Netflix has not caught up to this yet and I hope it never does.

Count me in. Only 1 of the 7 shows (with before and after commercials) is on my watch list so not a big deal. But hope this is temporary. I am surprised that they feel a small percent will jump on the no commercial price. The main reason I have DVR's is because I can skip commercials. Now I just need CBS All Access with a no commercial option and 90% of what I record will be covered.


That is just for now. In the future, they could add more "exclusive" shows and you may want to watch those shows.
Rating: 6 Votes
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52 months ago
Wait so no ads, except there are ads? Those are fairly popular shows
Rating: 6 Votes
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52 months ago
Surely someone has to investigate the wording of 'AD FREE' when ads will still be played on select shows. So its not AD FREE but less ADS than you get with the LIMITED ADS model.
Rating: 5 Votes
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52 months ago
Remember when the 8$ tier came to be and its purpose was no ads?
Rating: 5 Votes
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52 months ago

"exception shows"? All set to pay more until I read that phrase.


I was too until I saw that they are only pre and post ads and not interrupting the show. I'll take it.
Rating: 4 Votes
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52 months ago
The exception for ads isn't a big deal. However, it seems really stupid. Are they really making that much money on a 30 second ad after an episode airs? or a 15 second ad before it? That it makes sense to retain an exception for 7 shows? I imagine they did their math but it seems silly on the surface. And not worth the bad rap they get for having a no-ads subscription that has ads. I guess i'll trust they did the math.
Rating: 3 Votes
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