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Chinese Customs Tells Proview That Ban of iPad Exports Would be Difficult

Reuters reports that Proview Technology will apparently have a hard time blocking Apple iPad exports from China. On Tuesday, we reported that Proview was seeking a block on both Chinese imports and exports of the iPad over a trademark dispute with Apple. Given that Apple's iPad manufacturing is centered in China, such a move would be "catastrophic" for Apple.


However, China's customs authorities told Proview that it would be difficult to execute such a ban due to the popularity of Apple's products:
"The customs have told us that it will be difficult to implement a ban because many Chinese consumers love Apple products. The sheer size of the market is very big," Yang Long-san, chief of Proview Technology (Shenzhen), told Reuters in a telephone interview on Wednesday.
As many commenters have noted, China's Foxconn manufacturers many of Apple's products including the iPad, and a ban on exports would negatively impact Foxconn as well.

Apple claims that it purchased the Chinese rights to the trademark several years ago, but the original owner Proview and Chinese courts have disagreed with that assertion. Apple's case is still pending with Chinese courts as it seeks to appeal earlier rulings.




Top Rated Comments

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99 months ago

What is it that Proview actually sells?

Do they actually have an "ipad" product? Have they ever had one? Or have they just been squatting on a name?


They make monitors.

lifeinhd (one of our forum members) posted a picture last week showing the use of the name on one of their monitors purchased before Apple announced the iPad.

https://forums.macrumors.com/showpost.php?p=14283123&postcount=46

Rating: 16 Votes
99 months ago
Hang on a minute

Hang on a minute, didn't anyone think that this answer reported to be from Chinese customs is a bit odd? I mean, you would think that an export is banned or not banned based on a legal verdict, not based on whether it's popular or not.
Rating: 13 Votes
99 months ago

So what's a screen company doing trademarking the "ipad" name again? :confused:


Why shouldn't they? Why is a games console called an xbox when it's not an x-shaped box?

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Gentile reminder of what a corrupt, communist country China is.


What has it got to do with communism? All sorts of governments can be corrupt, and many would argue China is not (and never was) truly communist.
Rating: 12 Votes
99 months ago
Next on: ProView begins bankruptcy procedures.
Rating: 11 Votes
99 months ago
What is it that Proview actually sells?

Do they actually have an "ipad" product? Have they ever had one? Or have they just been squatting on a name?
Rating: 10 Votes
99 months ago
They are clearly just kicking up a ruckus and hoping to pressure Apple into settling for money, what with the imminent release of ipad3 and all. It's opportunism at its ugliest.

For once, here's hoping Apple uses all that wealth to sue said company into bankruptcy! :mad:
Rating: 10 Votes
99 months ago

Hang on a minute, didn't anyone think that this answer reported to be from Chinese customs is a bit odd? I mean, you would think that an export is banned or not banned based on a legal verdict, not based on whether it's popular or not.



It was a backwards reply from the government(central) that implies that it would hurt China's economic interests to ban exports of Apple products because Apple would and could move operations elsewhere. It also means that the Chinese public, which they want to keep happy and under control will have no reason to protest, and while Proview may very well hold a trademark in China for the ipad name, it benefits China more to help Apple then to rule against it because of long term profitability, job creation and export revenue. Each case that has been ruled against Apple has happened in a low-level quart, equivalent to a State Court(not federal district courts) and well China is a big country.

I would rather see the case disappear, no need for retaliation or continuing legal disputes, Proview is a company with no portfolio of products that is under considerable financial duress within the Chinese market, this claim is an attempt to get money from air.

If for some reason, China was to ban exports of iPads, long term damage would hurt China more than Apple as it would really reshape the export market in China and how foreign companies approach it, regardless of its speed or efficiency, and the benefits to Apple.
Rating: 9 Votes
99 months ago
Hehehe, there is too much money involved, Proview!
Rating: 8 Votes
99 months ago

Hang on a minute, didn't anyone think that this answer reported to be from Chinese customs is a bit odd? I mean, you would think that an export is banned or not banned based on a legal verdict, not based on whether it's popular or not.


Ummm—you do realize we’re talking about China here, right? If it hurts their economy (Apple’s manufacturing partners bring a lot of money into the country and create jobs), then China is going to do what is best for China. Courts be damned! That’s just how they deal.
Rating: 7 Votes
99 months ago

Corruption is rampant in China.


Not just in China. Corruption is rampant pretty much everywhere.
Rating: 7 Votes

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