Night Shift

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Introduced in iOS 9.3, Night Shift is a feature that cuts down on the amount of blue light an iOS device is putting out during the evening hours to iPhone and iPad users get better sleep. Night Shift is based on studies that have demonstrated blue light can negatively impact impact sleep by altering the body's circadian rhythm.

With Night Shift mode, when the sun goes down, the iPhone or iPad's screen will automatically change towards the warmer (yellower) colors in the spectrum, reducing blue light. In the morning, the display returns to its normal temperature color, mimicking natural light. Night shift can be set to come on when the sun sets or it can be toggled on with a Control Center button.

Night Shift is available on all iOS devices that have an A7 or later processor. This includes the iPhone 5s and later, the iPad mini 2 and later, the iPad Air and later, the iPod touch 6G, and the iPad Pro.

'Night Shift' How Tos

How to Use Night Shift Mode in iOS 9.3

Night Shift, a major new feature iOS 9.3, is a display-based setting that lets you "warm up" an iPhone or iPad's screen at night to cut down on blue light exposure. Similar to f.lux on the Mac, Night Shift will automatically change the color temperature of an iOS device's display to reflect the time of day. With Night Shift, an iPhone or iPad screen will look bright white with a blue-based lighting scheme during the day, but as the sun sets, that bright white will fade into a warm yellow that's easier on your eyes and your circadian rhythm. What's the Deal With Blue Light? Blue light, which is the light on the spectrum that makes our computer, tablet, and phone screens look so crisp and bright, is great during the day because it mimics a bright morning. Blue wavelengths wake us up, boost our attention, and let us know it's time to start the day. At night, blue light is less desirable because that's the time when our bodies should be getting ready to wind down for sleep. Studies have shown that looking at a bright blue screen during the evening hours can confuse the body's biological clock and disrupt our natural circadian rhythm (the ~24-hour light and dark schedule everyone runs on) by suppressing melatonin production, making it harder to fall asleep. All light disrupts the circadian rhythm, but blue light has been proven to be the most disruptive. On the Kelvin scale used to determine color temperature, an iPhone 6 display measures in at about 7100K, while an iPad Air 2 display is slightly warmer at 6900K. On the lighting spectrum, 6900K and 7100K blue

'Night Shift' Articles

Night Shift Beta Tidbits: Disabled in Low Power Mode, Control Center Changes

Apple has made some changes to Night Shift in iOS 9.3 betas 4 and 5. The most notable change is the disabling of the feature when in Low Power Mode. The toggle switch in both the Night Shift settings and Control Center are now grayed out in Low Power Mode. The new change has generated some complaints since it seems that users will want to use both features in the evening hours. Night Shift is now disabled in Low Power Mode on iOS 9.3 betas Meanwhile, tapping the Night Shift icon in Control Center no longer brings up a contextual menu with "Turn On For Now" and "Turn On Until Tomorrow" options. Instead, the toggle now manually activates Night Shift until the next trigger in your automatic schedule, such as sunset, sunrise, or a specific time. Night Shift no longer has a contextual menu in Control Center (right) Similarly, there is a new "Manually Enable Until Tomorrow" toggle in the Night Shift settings that keeps the feature turned on until the following morning's sunrise, or another specified time. This means the toggles in Settings and Control Center, which can also disable Night Shift, are essentially the same in this beta. Also in the settings, the color temperature slider has also been moved to the bottom of the menu. The "Cooler" and "Warmer" labels have been changed to "Less Warm" and "More Warm," while the small blue and orange circle markers have been removed. New fine print says "warmer temperatures can reduce eye strain." Night Shift is a major new feature in iOS 9.3 that, when enabled, automatically changes the color temperature of an iOS

Apple Canada's iOS 9.3 Preview Page Hints at Night Shift Toggle in Control Center

With the iOS 9.3 beta, Apple introduced a new feature called Night Shift. It's designed to cut down the amount of blue light an iOS device puts out in the evening, as Apple noted that studies have shown that blue light can negatively impact sleep by altering the body's circadian rhythm. Today, reddit user nickjosephson spotted a Night Shift toggle in Control Center on Apple Canada's iOS 9.3 preview page. The Night Shift toggle sits next to the brightness slider in Control Center with two options available: "Turn On For Now" and "Turn On Until Tomorrow." While the toggle is shown on an iPad Air, it's likely the new feature works on iPhones as well, though it's unclear where the toggle would fit on the iPhone's smaller Control Center. The Night Shift toggle is not featured on the American version of the iOS 9.3 preview page, which instead shows Apple News' "For You" section. Apple News is not yet available in Canada, which is the likely reason why the images are different. Night Shift can be activated on 64-bit iOS devices running iOS 9.3 by toggling it on in the Display and Brightness section of the Settings app. Users can either create their own Night Shift schedule or allow iOS to turn it on after sunset and turn it off at sunrise. The Night Shift toggle is likely to make its debut in a future beta of iOS 9.3. The next beta is expected in the coming

Developers Behind F.lux Call on Apple to Allow F.lux App for iOS Devices

With iOS 9.3, Apple introduced Night Shift, a feature that is designed to cut down on nighttime blue light exposure from iOS devices to encourage better sleep. Its similarity to the popular f.lux app for Mac did not go unnoticed, especially since Apple put a stop to an f.lux for iOS app just two months before Night Shift debuted. The developers behind f.lux have now published an official response to Apple's Night Shift feature, calling Apple's move to address nighttime exposure to blue light a "big commitment and an important first step." They ask Apple to take its support a step further by implementing the tools that would allow for an App Store version of the f.lux app. We're proud that we are the original innovators and leaders in this area. In our continued work over the last seven years, we have learned how complicated people actually are. The next phase of f.lux is something we cannot wait to ship to the world. [...] Today we call on Apple to allow us to release f.lux on iOS, to open up access to the features announced this week, and to support our goal of furthering research in sleep and chronobiology.F.lux for the Mac has been available for years and is popular in the Mac community with users who want to avoid blue light at night. Research has suggested that bright light exposure (especially the blue wavelength) at night can interrupt the circadian rhythm, causing sleep problems and other harmful effects on the immune system. While there's been a Mac solution to blue light for some time, no such tool has been available on a non-jailbroken iOS device. F.l