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New CarPlay Vehicles From Honda, Kia and Lincoln Debut at Detroit Auto Show

A trio of carmakers have unveiled new vehicles with CarPlay and Android Auto support at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit this month, including the 2017 Honda Ridgeline, 2017 Kia Forte5 and 2017 Lincoln Continental. All three models will be available in the first half of 2016.

Kia's all-new 2017 Forte5 will feature CarPlay and Android Auto support

The 2017 Ridgeline will mark Honda's return to the North American pickup truck market, which it exited after discontinuing the mid-size sport utility truck in 2014. Meanwhile, the 2017 Forte5 and 2017 Continental will be among Kia's and Lincoln's first CarPlay models in their vehicle lineups.

Honda's 2016 Accord and 2016 Civic also feature CarPlay and Android Auto, while Kia has indicated later availability in the 2016 Optima.

Lincoln is a luxury vehicle brand under Ford, which earlier this month announced it is adding CarPlay and Android Auto to all 2017 vehicles in North America equipped with its SYNC 3 platform. CarPlay and Android Auto will also be available in 2016 Ford vehicles with SYNC 3 as an upgrade later this year.

CarPlay has finally experienced widespread adoption in 2016, nearly three years after being introduced as "iOS in the Car" at WWDC 2013. Toyota is one of the only major vehicle brands without a future commitment to CarPlay, although the Japanese carmaker remains listed as a CarPlay partner on Apple's website.

The trio of new vehicles have yet to be added to Apple's new CarPlay available models list published on its website last week.

Related Roundup: CarPlay
Tags: Android Auto, Honda, Kia, Lincoln


Top Rated Comments

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8 months ago
Honestly this is what people are looking for in a new car purchase. All manufacturers should provide CarPlay and android auto and the ability to switch between the two at will. I feel any manufacturer that doesn't do that will see slower sales for the year/s. I myself am considering a new vehicle this year and basically only looking at vehicles with CarPlay, since I don't want to have to learn a whole new system every time I buy a new car.
Rating: 4 Votes
8 months ago




CarPlay has finally experienced widespread adoption ('//www.macrumors.com/2015/12/01/2016-carplay-vehicles-list-us-models/') in 2016, nearly three years after being introduced as "iOS in the Car" at WWDC 2013. Toyota is one of the only major vehicle brands without a future commitment to CarPlay, although the Japanese carmaker remains listed as a CarPlay partner on Apple's website.


I think "widespread" is a bit of a stretch. Only a handful of makers have committed their entire lineup to CarPlay. Honda and Ford are still taking baby steps. Audi is only "all in" with their VW brand. BMW has committed but no announcement on what model or model year.

Widespread means it's pervasive and more common than not. But that isn't the case yet. Carplay is making tremendous strides at adoption, and is increasingly common on current models, but lets not delude ourselves into thinking it's widespread yet.
Rating: 2 Votes
8 months ago

Your first example is not CarPlay enabled, if you choose to use your device as an iPod you will not have any CarPlay functionality whatosever, as if it is not connected. Using CarPlay also disables the use of Bluetooth devices with the car, as they are expected to connect to the iPhone instead...and when a CarPlay over AirPlay connection is eventually introduced, the WiFi functions will probably be lost as well.


Sorry to disagree.

I do not know the specs of CarPlay/Wireless, but fully expect CarPlay to be transport agnostic, and behave equally either wired or wireless.

Here is my take:

* The control plane remains always under control of the iDevice: where the iDevice display is sent to the vehicle's in-dash screen via an H.264 video stream. The in-dash display turns into a pass-thru, remote hit-sensitive screen.
* The data plane remains under control of the app on the iDevice: so that what you click-on, see and hear is precisely the content that the app manages.
* The "glue" between the car's in-dash device and the user's iDevice is transport agnostic: wired or wireless.

Could be wrong, of course.
Rating: 1 Votes
8 months ago

No need to get snooty, of course I saw the article...which clearly says "wireless" followed by assumptions about it being Bluetooth. Nothing to take up with Apple nor VW, they didn't say a word about how it works.

Bluetooth does not lend itself well to client/server functions that require a lot of bandwidth. Apple will undoubtedly want to leverage AirPlay for this, if only for better quality audio...but also because there are screen mirroring functions happening. When's the last time you used a remote desktop over a bluetooth connection?



I responded the way I did because your response to me was rather uppity and cocksure ("Highly unlikely," was your statement). No one knows the reach of wireless CarPlay, only that its coming, but if it's not BT then all that is left is WiFi. Either way it's wireless and its in the works, if not demo ready.
Rating: 1 Votes
8 months ago

Just a personal opinion:

If I end up with a car that has AndroidAuto/CarPlay for my next car, and CarPlay still does not have Google Maps and Waze, then my next phone will be Android and not an iPhone, period. Right now I get by fine with my 6s+ mounted on my dash.

There is no way at all, no way, I will not have Google Maps and Waze for my navigation needs. Those two apps have been, and continue to be a genuine order of magnitude superior in overall functionality as compared to Apple Maps.

Apple needs to be in discussions with Google about getting GMaps and Waze into CarPlay, and concede to Google whatever they want, or there are going to be a whole lot of iPhone users switching over/back to Android.


This is why I'm not in a rush to get car play. I'm fine with a mounted iphone.
Rating: 1 Votes
8 months ago

$0.47 in Michigan :)

And yes, people still need a method to drive. No one 'needs' these extra features. Heck, all I care about is A/C, power steering, power locks, and power windows.

All these seat warmers, motorized seats with memory, TPMS, etc is just more annoyance and drives the cost of the car up. I miss the cars of pre-2000 that didn't have a lot of that crap.

Sure having these features adds safety and comfort, but it isn't selling point of the car itself. If someone wants a Honda Accord they will buy it.

Things that do push a car sale are structural safety, price, performance, mpg, and/or reliability.


Suit yourself. I'm also in Michigan and could never go back to a car that doesn't have a heated steering wheel, heated seats, back up camera, keyless /proximity unlock/start... The list goes on. I fail to see how it's an annoyance but to each their own!
Rating: 1 Votes
8 months ago

I think "widespread" is a bit of a stretch. Only a handful of makers have committed their entire lineup to CarPlay. Honda and Ford are still taking baby steps. Audi is only "all in" with their VW brand. BMW has committed but no announcement on what model or model year.

Widespread means it's pervasive and more common than not. But that isn't the case yet. Carplay is making tremendous strides at adoption, and is increasingly common on current models, but lets not delude ourselves into thinking it's widespread yet.

Widespread: common over a wide area or among many people

Doesn't mean it's more common than not (i.e. a majority), it simply means it's available over a wide range of areas/models. I would argue that this is the case. Especially considering how carplay was announced over 2 years ago and little bits have been trickling out ever since. We've finally started seeing a wide adoption.
Rating: 1 Votes
8 months ago
Come on Mazda. Your v55 infotainment update already has some references about it for the 2016 Mazda6 (can't speak for other models):

rootfs1upd/jci/gui/apps/system/js/systemApp.js: { appData : { appName : 'carplay', isVisible : false, mmuiEvent : 'SelectCarPlay' }, text1Id : 'CarPlay', disabled : true, itemStyle : 'style01', hasCaret : false },

There is even a directory of CarPlay resources:

rootfs1upd/rootfs/jci/gui/resources/js/carplay

Just get it together please.
Rating: 1 Votes
8 months ago

Not really at all. Like most things tech related, most people have only a passing acknowledgement of their existence. We know about CP/AA because it falls within our sphere of interest. CP/AA will help sell no more cars than back up cameras or lane departure detection. Cars are going to sell regardless, especially now since gas is beyond cheap ($1.65/gallon where I live). CP/AA will be among many options that can help move a car, but neither will significantly affect car sales the way your quote implies.


$0.47 in Michigan :)

And yes, people still need a method to drive. No one 'needs' these extra features. Heck, all I care about is A/C, power steering, power locks, and power windows.

All these seat warmers, motorized seats with memory, TPMS, etc is just more annoyance and drives the cost of the car up. I miss the cars of pre-2000 that didn't have a lot of that crap.

Sure having these features adds safety and comfort, but it isn't selling point of the car itself. If someone wants a Honda Accord they will buy it.

Things that do push a car sale are structural safety, price, performance, mpg, and/or reliability.
Rating: 1 Votes
8 months ago

I think "widespread" is a bit of a stretch. Only a handful of makers have committed their entire lineup to CarPlay. Honda and Ford are still taking baby steps. Audi is only "all in" with their VW brand. BMW has committed but no announcement on what model or model year.


^^^This!

A remark. CarPlay over WiFi (whenever that becomes fielded) has a peculiar behavior. Why?

On many autos today (including my Audi), there is a Car Area Network (CAN) using WiFi which provides an iNET connection with an (optional) data-only SIM. I expect all cars to have such a CAN.

CarPlay/WiFi has two planes: data and control. Here is my take on their behavior:

DATA PLANE:
If video/music source streams from the iNET (and not from the iDevice, which is playing as an iPod) the stream has to do a u-turn over WiFi, as follows: iNET -> CAN AP -> iDevice -> CAN AP -> car speakers

CONTROL PLANE:
All control remains on the iDevice under CarPlay, so: iDevice <-> CAN AP <-> car UI

Just a remark. I wonder how well that is going to work.
Rating: 1 Votes

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