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Norwegian Consumer Group Files Complaint Over iCloud's 'Convoluted' Terms of Service

icloud_iconApple is facing a complaint from the Norwegian Consumer Council over the terms and conditions for its iCloud service, reports ZDNet. The consumer watchdog group claims the agreement violates the Norwegian Market Act, which governs marketing practices in the country.

The complaint arose from a study of seven cloud storage providers offering service in Norway and was part of a broader investigation into how digital services are being offered to Norwegian consumers. The Norwegian Consumer Council cited Apple for its 8,600 word iCloud terms of service, which it claims is "convoluted and unclear."

Particularly troubling to the Consumer Council were terms that allow Apple to modify the agreement at its discretion without notifying customers of the changes.
"Cloud storage services rely on users' trust and confidence. However, the current terms undermine this. It is important that consumer rights and privacy also apply to online services. We are convinced that all parties are better served with more user-friendly terms. Apple offers to store valuable information on behalf of its users, but gives itself the right to amend the agreement at its sole discretion. As consumers, we are left with no real rights or security. Receiving notice when terms change should be a bare minimum requirement. The fact that this can be done without informing the users is unacceptable," Finn Myrstad, head of digital services unit at the Consumer Council, said in a statement.
This is one of several overseas complaints Apple has faced recently, including a Belgian claim that Apple misled consumers about warranty information and an accusation of tax fraud by Italian authorities.

Despite these occasional hurdles, Apple continues to operate a strong global business with international sales accounting for 66 percent of revenue in Q2 2014. Apple also opened its first stores in Brazil and Turkey this year, and now has a retail presence in 15 countries worldwide.


Top Rated Comments

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Posted: 14 weeks ago
No one reads the TOS anyway.
Rating: 8 Votes
Posted: 14 weeks ago
And once again, most tech people shrug off a perfectly valid complaint against their tech gods.

Sigh.

Why is it that North American governments and consumer advocates never have a damn thing to say about the miserable anti-consumer defaults of the computer industry? Everyone here is so totally indoctrinated into the BS special pleading excuses and complacency.
Rating: 7 Votes
Posted: 14 weeks ago

A good reason why I never want to be running a multi-national consumer business. You need to run a marketing and legal department for each country, no matter how small.


If you want to do business in a country you have to comply with that country's laws. If you consider the costs excessive nobody is forcing you to keep doing business there.
Rating: 6 Votes
Posted: 14 weeks ago

No one reads the TOS anyway.


Exactly. Scroll scroll scroll your boat. Accept terms. :p
Rating: 4 Votes
Posted: 14 weeks ago

No one reads the TOS anyway.


Exactly. Scroll scroll scroll your boat. Accept terms. :p




Why wont it read?!

:D
Rating: 4 Votes
Posted: 14 weeks ago

No one reads the TOS anyway.


Why doesn't it read?!!!
Rating: 4 Votes
Posted: 14 weeks ago
A good reason why I never want to be running a multi-national consumer business. You need to run a marketing and legal department for each country, no matter how small.
Rating: 2 Votes
Posted: 14 weeks ago

Well, the argument goes that people are not total idiots, and don't need to be treated like slow children. That is, they can make informed decisions (like not to buy stuff, or to agree to stuff without reading it) on their own.

Of course, we know this is not true at all. Most people are, in fact, total idiots, incompetent boobs or dim-witted children; or, at the least, a lot dumber than me.


What if you agree to terms of service that are decent, only to have them changed behind your back without notifying you?
Rating: 2 Votes
Posted: 14 weeks ago
With the corporation backed US Congress unwilling to change anything that offends their paymasters, it might take the actions of a few progressive countries to write legislation that protects the little guy. Not that it will trickle down here unless people inform themselves. Well done Norway, well done.
Rating: 2 Votes
Posted: 14 weeks ago

It would be nice if MR actually included the TOS/TOC verbiage this group is complaining about. Just because the complaint is coming from a consumer watchdog type group doesn't mean it's valid.


Here's the actual complaint, with the references you're asking for (in English):
http://www.forbrukerradet.no/_attachment/1175090/binary/29927

Here's The Consumer Council's own article on this subject (again, in English):
http://www.forbrukerradet.no/forside/presse/pressemeldinger/apple-icloud-violates-norwegian-and-european-law
Rating: 2 Votes

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