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Chrome for iOS Adds Data Compression and Translation Tools [Updated]

Google today announced an update to its Chrome web browser for iOS, bringing data compression functionality that can reduce data usage by up to 50%.
To start saving data and turn on an even more secure browsing experience, visit “Settings” > “Bandwidth management” > “Reduce data usage.” Then simply turn the toggle to “On.” From this menu, you’ll also be able to track how much bandwidth you save each month as you browse on Chrome.
chrome_compression_translation
The update will also see the addition of a translation bar that automatically offers to translate web pages into the user's language. The translation bar will be familiar to users of the desktop version of Chrome, as a similar feature is already available on that platform.

Google says that the update will be rolling out "over the next few days". Chrome is a free download from the App Store. [Direct Link]

Update January 27: The update is now available.

Top Rated Comments

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Posted: 7 months ago

The words "even more secure browsing experience" are not words I ever expected to hear when referring to anything Google but then again that is what Google PR department is pushing out. In fact, I suspect that this routes every one of your page views through Google's computers for a thorough data mining operation.


It says so right there in the screenshot. "Chrome is using Google servers to compress pages you visit before downloading them."
Rating: 4 Votes
Posted: 7 months ago

How is it secure if they snoop ALL YOUR DATA before passing it on to you?


As secure as their servers are, which is actually quite secure.

Or we could run around paranoid...
Rating: 4 Votes
Posted: 7 months ago

So let me get the straight. You are afraid of off-chance that someone may be intercepting your non-https web browsing but are ok with passing your data through a company whose business model is data mining? Wow.

Probably because those aren't the same things at all.
Rating: 4 Votes
Posted: 7 months ago
The words "even more secure browsing experience" are not words I ever expected to hear when referring to anything Google but then again that is what Google PR department is pushing out. In fact, I suspect that this routes every one of your page views through Google's computers for a thorough data mining operation.
Rating: 2 Votes
Posted: 7 months ago

The words "even more secure browsing experience" are not words I ever expected to hear when referring to anything Google but then again that is what Google PR department is pushing out. In fact, I suspect that this routes every one of your page views through Google's computers for a thorough data mining operation.


What does their data mining have to do with security in a browser?
Rating: 2 Votes
Posted: 7 months ago

What does their data mining have to do with security in a browser?


How is it secure if they snoop ALL YOUR DATA before passing it on to you?
Rating: 2 Votes
Posted: 7 months ago

So let me get the straight. You are afraid of the off-chance that someone may be intercepting your non-https web browsing but are ok with passing your non-https data through a company whose business model is data mining? Wow.


For one, I'm not.

For two, I trust Google more than random strangers.

WebP is Google's own image format that results in even smaller image files, thereby speeding up the transfer and display of those images. That's not a concern, but what is a concern is that Google is acting as a proxy for *all* of your web traffic. That's scary because they have a responsibility to be running a profitable business, so why would they be giving away this high-tech service for free? There must be something they are gaining from it, and I suspect that data mining, even just knowing which websites your visiting, is giving them ammunition for more effective targeted advertising.


They're gaining our data, yes.

To be honest, that isn't the problem I have with Google these days. They can have my data, the worst that happens is that I get targeted ads.

Oh, also, WebP sounds amazing.
Rating: 1 Votes
Posted: 7 months ago
Google is trying to outdo the NSA on privacy invasion. The NSA put back doors into Linux that have never been code reviewed - I bet Google did the same with WebKit. Apple probably kept removing them, thus prompting Google to branch away.

Also, don't kid yourself about the security of Google's servers. Nothing is impenetrable/unhackable. Even if Google has the most secure servers in the world, your best bet for retaining your privacy is to not trust all your data with a single company. Just like you shouldn't use the same password everywhere (if a single company leaks it, they may as well all have) - you shouldn't trust a single company with your everything. If Google leaks, everything you've ever done on the web is out.

Personally, I'd rather simply not be tracked, thus my switching to DuckDuckGo. Not only do they not track me, I actually rather like their "bangs" (shortcuts.)
Rating: 1 Votes
Posted: 7 months ago

And thus they made Blink, an Open Source project. Must be a bunch of people just twiddling their thumbs. I'm told that Open Source prevents these backdoors. Or are people, the community that is looking over the code and so forth, just being nice to Google and giving them a pass?


To the contrary, no, open source projects are extremely vulnerable to these problems. Problems in open source projects get solved when they cause usability issues for the users that happen to be capable of patching them (or report them to people who can patch them.) If the code seems to work alright though, then nobody will look at it very closely.

This was how the NSA was able to hack everything around the world: they have backdoors into several popular open source projects (especially security frameworks). Google is capable of doing the exact thing. Apple, being a company that cares a great deal about not shipping crap, reviews an abnormal amount of the open source code they use. Thus prompting Google to branch away from Apple, so that they could put more backdoors in without Apple serving as a whistleblower.

http://sandeen.net/wordpress/computers/linux/who-reviews-linux-kernel-commits/

Edit: And for the record, no computer is immune from hacking, but Google's servers are quite secure.


Correct, no computer is immune to hacking. You make the red statement as if a server is something other than a computer. It's like saying "A rectangle has 4 right angles. A square does not." Not only does a square have 4 right angles, it's in fact a rectangle.
Rating: 1 Votes
Posted: 7 months ago

As secure as their servers are, which is actually quite secure.

Or we could run around paranoid...


Of course Google's servers are secure. No way do they want any body else to be able to steal the data they've mined from you. They want to sell it themselves.
Rating: 1 Votes

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