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iPad Edition of The New Yorker Has 100,000 Readers

The first subscriber numbers for Condé Nast's iPad experiment are out, and The New Yorker has 100,000 readers, according to the New York Times:
Offering the first detailed glimpse into iPad magazine sales since subscriptions became available in the spring, The New Yorker said that it now had 100,000 iPad readers, including about 20,000 people who bought subscriptions at $59.99 a year.

Additionally, more than 75,000 people have taken advantage of the magazine’s offer to allow print subscribers to download the app free. Several thousand more people, on average, buy single issues for $4.99 each week.
The article's numbers are a little confusing, mostly because of the word "additionally", but here's how we see it breaking down:

- 75,000 readers who already subscribe to the New Yorker print edition.
- 20,000 readers who subscribe to the annual iPad-only edition for $59.99/year.
- 5,000 readers who buy individual issues for $4.99/week.

The New Yorker's reader count is the highest of any of Condé's iPad titles, which includes tech-savvy Wired magazine. The New Yorker has more than 1 million print subscribers.

All the Condé Nast titles are available via in-app subscription, with Apple taking 30% of sales. Apple has collected approximately $360,000 from The New Yorker's 20,000 annual subscribers.

Condé reported today that it has 242,000 digital readers (PDF) across all its titles, with 106,000 of those being new readers without print subscriptions.

Top Rated Comments

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44 months ago

Not meaning to be sarcastic - I was wondering why you called the magazine garbage :confused:

For what it's is worth, I'm not a subscriber.

Just asking.


Because he's a kid, and it's not a video game?:rolleyes:
Rating: 8 Votes
44 months ago

There's that many people who read that garbage?



Because he's a kid, and it's not a video game?:rolleyes:


Because it uses big words
Rating: 3 Votes
44 months ago
If only the NYTimes would adopt a reasonable price....
Rating: 2 Votes
44 months ago

There's that many people who read that garbage?


Not meaning to be sarcastic - I was wondering why you called the magazine garbage :confused:

For what it's is worth, I'm not a subscriber.

Just asking.
Rating: 2 Votes
44 months ago

There's that many people who read that garbage?


Miss News of the World, do you?
Rating: 2 Votes
44 months ago

Good to see the iPad subscription price is $10 less than the price listed on their site.


And good to see that they haven't done crazy and unrealistic pricing like the New York Times and Wall Street journal.
Rating: 2 Votes
44 months ago

So does that mean that the rule is no longer followed in places like newspaper style guides? :confused:


No, that does not mean that the rule is no longer followed in places like newspaper style guides. The AP Style Book says, "Periods always go inside quotation marks." Look at any U.S. newspaper and see if commas and periods fall outside of quotation marks. Here's a quote from a story in today's Washington Post: "This has helped crystallize the debate. There is no doubt there will be a very distinct choice." Notice that the period went before the closing quote mark. It always does.

Don't let a tech blog be your guide to grammar. Don't even take my word for it. Check out all the style guides out there.
Rating: 1 Votes
44 months ago

No, that does not mean that the rule is no longer followed in places like newspaper style guides. The AP Style Book says, "Periods always go inside quotation marks." Look at any U.S. newspaper (emphasis added) and see if commas and periods fall outside of quotation marks. Here's a quote from a story in today's Washington Post: "This has helped crystallize the debate. There is no doubt there will be a very distinct choice."


And at the same time, do a web search for "logical punctuation". The British English standard is rapidly gaining traction outside of a few old-school guides. (Many at MacRumours say that "print is dead", so referencing print style guides seems like an archaic throwback. ;) )

For example:

...
But in copy-editor-free zones—the Web and emails, student papers, business memos—with increasing frequency, commas and periods find themselves on the outside of quotation marks, looking in. A punctuation paradigm is shifting.

Indeed, unless you associate exclusively with editors and prescriptivists, you can find copious examples of the "outside" technique—which readers of Virginia Woolf and The Guardian will recognize as the British style — no further away than your Twitter or Facebook feed. I certainly can. Conan O'Brien, for example, recently posted:

Conan's staffers' kids say the darndest things. Unfortunately, in this case "darndest" means "incriminating",...
http://www.slate.com/id/2293056/


logical punctuation

a recommended approach to placing punctuation where the punctuation is logically grouped with the part of the sentence it applies to, rather than where arbitrary rules imply it should go. For instance, your grammar teachers said to put commas and periods inside quotes like this:


“Reading is fun,” said the grammar teacher.

Commas were originally put inside quotes as an artifact of how type was set. Now that text appears on a screen, it makes more sense to put it outside the quote:

“The Web is more fun”, says the tech-writer.

Use punctuation where it makes sense. Use commas to indicate pauses, and to reduce ambiguity.

http://www.usabilityfirst.com/glossary/logical-punctuation/ (quoted in entirety)


The US style guides are based on technology that goes back to the 15th century and Johannes Gensfleisch zur Laden zum Gutenberg (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johannes_Gutenberg). We're in the "post moveable-type" era now, and the world (outside the US) has changed.

The CMS and AP are under pressure to modernize the archaic parts of their style guides.

So, if you're sending your CV to a US newspaper or publisher, following the AP/CMS style is a good idea.

If you're writing less formally, or sending your CV to an international English newspaper or publisher, it is not an error to follow logical punctuation.


Notice that the period went before the closing quote mark. It always does.


Perhaps you should check the various US style guides, and look at the cases where the comma/period go outside the quotation mark. It doesn't "always" go inside.

One example is if the quotation is a literal letter - then even some US guides put the comma outside. For example:
[LIST]
[*]Correct: I laugh when I see the letter "Q", it just strikes me as funny.
[*]Incorrect: I laugh when I see the letter "Q," it just strikes me as funny.
[/LIST]

Never say "always" or "never", it just takes one counterexample to prove you wrong.
Rating: 1 Votes
44 months ago
20 thousand subscribers on the iPad, 1 MILLION subscribers of the print edition.

I'm not saying print isn't dead; but the iPad version is a major flop.

2% of subscribers are paying iPad subscribers. I'm sure it's nice and all, but a success it is not. :eek:
Rating: 1 Votes
44 months ago

Go figure. Old habits must die hard. That rag hasn't had anything worth reading for about 3 decades now, and yes I read it at the stands every so often.

Acutally, I can't think of one magazine worth reading. The best mags are sales mags like Hemmings. It is unabashed about what it is, unlike the others whom cover their advertising core with dog sh-t articles and propaganda.


Old habits like thinking, curiosity and appreciation of good writing . . .

But you already know everything. By the way, that should be "who" and not "whom." "Whom" is the objective case. In your sentence, "others who" would be the subject of the clause, and thus take the nominative case.

Understand? I thought not.
Rating: 1 Votes

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