Flickr


'Flickr' Articles

iPhone Remains Flickr's Most Popular Camera in 2017 Ahead of Canon and Nikon

As it does every year, Flickr today shared its 2017 Year in Review statistics highlighting various aspects of the photo-sharing community with lists including the Top 25 Photos of 2017, Top Devices, and Top Brands. For the Top Brands category, Apple has once again beaten out dedicated camera makers with iPhones being used by 54 percent of photographers uploading photos to Flickr this year, followed by Canon in second place (23 percent) and Nikon in third place (18 percent). Over the past few years, iPhones have been rising up Flickr's Year in Review rankings. In 2015 iPhones were used for 42 percent of the photos shared to Flickr, and then in 2016 Apple's smartphones retained the top spot again, with 47 percent. Apple first surpassed Nikon to become the second most popular camera brand on Flickr's 2014 rankings. The most popular iPhones used to capture photos shared on Flickr in 2017 were slightly older models: the iPhone 6, iPhone 6s, and iPhone 5s. In total, iPhones accounted for 9 of the Top 10 Devices of 2017, with the Canon 5D Mark III representing the only non-Apple product on the list. The Top Device Types list has stayed the same over the years, but in 2017 smartphones have grown to account for 50 percent of photos uploaded to Flickr, up from 48 percent last year. DSLR came in second with 33 percent (up from 25 percent last year), followed by point and shoot with 12 percent (down from 21 percent), and then mirrorless at four percent (up from three percent). Flickr has posted quite a few lists of photos recapping the past year, including the overall Top

iPhone Remains Flickr's Most Popular Camera in 2015 Ahead of Canon, Nikon and Samsung

Flickr has published a 2015 Year in Review that again crowns the iPhone as the most popular camera, used for 42% of photos uploaded, based on EXIF data analysis. iPhones finished ahead of the Canon EOS, used for 27% of uploaded photos, and the Nikon D, used for 16% of uploaded photos. The photo sharing website's cameras page lists the iPhone 6 as the most popular camera in the Flickr community, trailed by the iPhone 5s, Galaxy S5, iPhone 6 Plus and iPhone 5. Apple is the most popular camera brand on Flickr overall, ranking ahead of Samsung, Canon, Nikon, Sony, Motorola and LG. iPhones have been the most popular smartphone cameras on Flickr for several years, which is largely unsurprising since DSLRs and some point-and-shoot cameras cannot be carried around as easily. In January 2015, Apple eclipsed Nikon to become the second most popular camera brand on

Apple Passes Nikon to Become Second Most Popular Camera Brand on Flickr

Flickr over the weekend released data detailing the most popular camera rankings of 2014 for the online photo sharing service. With 100 million users uploading 10 billion photos last year, the usual standouts of Canon and Nikon edged out most of the competition, but most interesting was Apple moving past Nikon to take second place in the rankings (via The Next Web). Focusing solely on the top 5 camera brands used on the service last year, Canon took first place with 13.4 percent, followed by Apple with 9.6 percent and Nikon with 9.3 percent. Samsung and Sony round out the other top spots. Individual iPhone models have long registered as the most popular camera devices on Flickr, but in looking at overall brand performance, major traditional camera manufacturers Canon and Nikon with as many as several hundred different models on the market long held down the top spots until Apple's entry in 2014. Flickr also looked at the top mobile device cameras used on Flickr, where Apple unsurprisingly dominated the top ten list. In first through fourth were the iPhone 5 (10.6 percent), iPhone 4s (7.0 percent), iPhone 4 (4.3 percent), and the iPhone 5c (2.0 percent). The iPhone 6, iPad, and iPad mini also placed in the top ten. It is unclear why the iPhone 5s is not included on Flickr's year-end lists, as it has been registering as the most popular camera overall for a number of months now. Though Flickr's data can't exactly be used to specifically track the rise or fall of full-fledged DSLR and professional cameras, as Flickr is used by both paid professionals and