Bendgate


'Bendgate' Articles

Apple Knew About Bendgate and Touch Disease iPhone 6 Issues Months in Advance of Repair Programs

As part of an ongoing lawsuit over the "Touch Disease" manufacturing issue affecting iPhone 6 and 6 Plus devices, Apple was required to provide the court with internal testing documents that suggest the company knew about iPhone 6 and 6 Plus design problems before the two devices launched. The full scope of the internal documents remain under seal, but the judge presiding over the case, Lucy Koh, made some of the information public when she published an opinion on the case earlier this month, and Motherboard shared the details she offered up about the case. Apple knew that the iPhone 6 was 3.3 times more likely to bend than the iPhone 5s, while the iPhone 6 Plus was 7.2 times more likely to bend ahead of the release of the two devices. Publicly, though, Apple said that the two devices had been "thoroughly tested" and evaluated for "strength and durability." Bending, according to Apple, was "extremely rare" and only happened to a small number of customers. At the heart of the Touch Disease problem is an earlier issue that received widespread attention -- bendgate. Bendgate was the first and most visible issue affecting the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus, but the malleability of the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus is also what led to Touch Disease, which occurs when the chip that detects touch input becomes unseated from the logic board from bending or as Apple claims, multiple drops. Apple quietly addressed Touch Disease in an engineering change implemented in May 2016, but did not launch a repair program until months later after the problem received significant attention. From

iPhone 7 Undergoes Extreme Durability Test in New Video [Updated]

Hardware review YouTube channel JerryRigEverything has put the new iPhone 7 through an intensive durability test, concluding that Apple has designed a "solid phone" with good build quality, but with a couple of reservations. The latest video shows how a black matte iPhone 7 stands up to scratching, applied heat, and bending. In the first test, the screen stands up to a utility knife with no problems. However, when a harder level 6 mineral pick is applied it incurs damage, suggesting that coins and keys won't scratch it, but care should be taken to protect it against other abrasive materials that can be found in pockets and purses. The iPhone 7 screen also lasts almost 10 seconds on contact with an open flame, after which the pixels get warm and turn off before completely recovering within seconds. In conclusion, screen durability is described as being "on par with typical smartphone screen hardness". On the back of the phone, the anodized aluminum casing on the matte black model holds up well against key scratches, leaving hardly a mark, but it can't stand up to the cut of a razor blade. Elsewhere, the new Taptic Engine home button stands up to the assaults of a razor blade, but suffers a deep scratch with a mid-level hardness pick. JerryRigEverything claims that this proves it is regular glass and not sapphire, contradicting Apple's own specifications for the phone. Similarly, the rear camera lens on the iPhone 7 is demonstrated to be scratch-resistant when a razor blade is used, but it scratches deeply with a level 6 hardness pick. According to the

iPhone 6s Plus Very Difficult to Bend in New Bend Test Video

Last year, iPhone 6 Plus users began noticing that their phones were bent after carrying the devices in their pockets for a few days. The issue, known as "BendGate", became widespread after a video test revealed that it didn't take much pressure for the 6 Plus to bend near the volume buttons. Apple strengthened the weaker points of the 6s Plus and added a new, stronger 7000 series aluminum to the device. Today, YouTube channel FoneFox subjected the iPhone 6s Plus to a bend test to see if Apple's improvements help. In the video, the phone is given the same bend test it was given a year ago. FoneFox's Christian simply wraps his hands around the device and attempts to bend it in the middle. While the phone starts to bend under more and more pressure it snaps back to its normal shape once the test is over. Christian notes that he can feel his thumb sink into the back of the device, but that the phone doesn't stay bent. FoneFox then adds a second person to the test, getting each person to pull one side of the phone. In this situation, the iPhone 6s Plus does bend. However, FoneFox notes that the pressure exerted with two people is unlikely to occur in situations where the phone is in a user's pocket. For comparison, the iPhone 6 Plus bent in just a couple seconds in the original bend test video, available to watch below.

Apple Addresses 'Bendgate' By Strengthening Weak Points of 'iPhone 6s' Shell

Following the launch of the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus last September, some users began experiencing issues with the larger-sized smartphones bending in their pockets after normal day-to-day usage. The issue -- informally known as "Bendgate" -- became widespread after a video test revealed it does not take much force to cause a slight curvature in the device. iPhone 6 Plus bend test by Lewis Hilsenteger of Unbox Therapy Apple later commented that an iPhone 6 Plus bending under normal use is "extremely rare," adding that it had received only nine complaints from customers about the issue at the time. The company said the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus feature a "precision engineered unibody enclosure" constructed from 6000 series anodized aluminum and "stainless steel and titanium inserts to reinforce high stress locations" on the devices. Nevertheless, it appears that Apple engineers have tweaked the design of the so-called "iPhone 6s" by strengthening the weak points of the smartphone's rear shell. A new YouTube video shared by Unbox Therapy shows that the areas around the Home and volume buttons on the "iPhone 6s" appear to be notably thicker -- 1.9mm versus 1.14mm -- suggesting that Apple's next iPhones could be less susceptible to bending under normal usage. Interestingly, the video shows that the "iPhone 6s" rear shell is also slightly lighter, despite having a thicker shell at certain weak points. The purported "iPhone 6s" rear shell weighs in at 25 grams, compared to 27 grams for the iPhone 6 rear shell, suggesting that Apple could be using a new material