Apple Seeds macOS Catalina Golden Master to Developers

Apple today seeded the golden master version of macOS 10.15 Catalina to developers, three days after seeding the tenth macOS Catalina beta and over three months after the new Mac operating system update was first unveiled at the Worldwide Developers Conference.

The golden master version of macOS Catalina represents the final version of the update that will be provided to the public at release. The new ‌macOS Catalina‌ software can be downloaded using the Software Update mechanism in System Preferences after installing the proper profile from the Developer Center.


‌macOS Catalina‌ eliminates the iTunes app, splitting it into Music, Podcasts, and TV apps. The three new apps offer similar functionality to iTunes, but are split up by feature. iOS device management is still available on the Mac, but it's now done through the Finder rather than iTunes.

With a new Sidecar feature, you can turn your iPad into a second display for your Mac with just the click of a button. The Apple Pencil works with ‌Sidecar‌, so you can turn your ‌iPad‌ into a drawing tablet in apps like Photoshop and Illustrator.

Your Apple Watch can be used to approve security prompts for passwords and other info in ‌macOS Catalina‌, and Macs with a T2 chip now support Activation Lock, making them more secure. There's a new Find My that brings the ‌Find My‌ Mac app to the Mac for the first time and even lets you track your devices when they're offline, or, in the case of notebooks, closed.

Screen Time is available on the Mac as well as iOS devices, and Project Catalyst, a new Apple initiative, will let developers easily port their ‌iPad‌ apps over to the Mac to increase the number of Mac apps available.

There's a new Photos interface that surfaces your best photos organized by day, month, or year, there's a new start page in Safari, Mail has new tools for muting email threads and blocking senders, and the Reminders app has been overhauled.

32-bit apps no longer work in ‌macOS Catalina‌, which is something to be aware of before installing the beta.

For more details on ‌macOS Catalina‌, make sure to check out our macOS Catalina roundup. Apple is planning to release ‌macOS Catalina‌ sometime in October.

Top Rated Comments

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7 weeks ago


This may well be at least that bad. Apple is intentionally breaking software that millions of people rely on.

Dropping 32 bit support is inexcusable. I'm anticipating my phone ringing off the hook in the weeks after release with people needing me to remove 10.15 and reinstall 10.14.

I'm disabling automatic macOS updates on every machine I touch. Almost nobody in the real world is ready for this.

And what's worse, I've got it running on a test machine, have had it for months now. It doesn't add anything useful. Other than broken software and the inexplicable System Preferences rearrange, it's almost indistinguishable from 10.14.

Oh, so you're one of those people.
You probably said the same thing when Mac OS X Lion dropped Power PC apps. The real world isn't ready for it. Well, if they are not ready now, they will be soon. Apple Has been moving to 64 bit for the last 14 years. I am surprised its taken them this long. They probably have been thinking about dropping 32 bit apps since Yosemite. Just be happy those apps were supported for this long, and move on.
Every year we get people like you, especially when there is a big change. People who stood by Mac OS X Tiger, and said that Leopard would never replace it.
Same with Snow Leopard, and Mavericks. But the world has moved on
People will move on from Mojave and 32 bit apps eventually.
Just you wait when Apple moves away from Intel CPUs. You will be all up in arms.

FYI, there are plenty of changes, including the split up of iTunes without removing any features, the ability to use an iPad as a display, and several others.
Just because the interface is extremely similar to Mojave does not mean that it is the same.
Rating: 27 Votes
7 weeks ago
Where's 10.15.1 beta 1? This is unacceptable.
Rating: 20 Votes
7 weeks ago


just turned up, Apples version of Windows Vista

I don't think any OS can compare to that disaster :rolleyes:
Rating: 17 Votes
7 weeks ago


[…]
Dropping 32 bit support is inexcusable.
[…]


Come on - Apple started the transition to 64 Bit in 2005 with Mac OS X 10.4 Tiger. That was 14 years ago - I'd say any developer who had only the slightest intention to keep his code up to date had plenty of time to do so …
Rating: 16 Votes
7 weeks ago


I don't think any OS can compare to that disaster :rolleyes:

Windows ME!!
Rating: 12 Votes
7 weeks ago


Anyone know if the GM build now fixes the white screen when booting up through the EGPU?


GM build quality sucks. Just look at the crappy chrome SUV door handles.
Rating: 11 Votes
7 weeks ago
Good. I accidentally upgraded the reminders app on my phone, and now it doesn't sync across macOS and iOS :\
Rating: 11 Votes
7 weeks ago
The dropping of Dashboard ??? is the deal breaker for me. But I'll upgrade eventually. Bye bye Dashboard. I'll miss how elegantly you swooped into action. Notification Center is no replacement. I wish Apple knew this.
Rating: 10 Votes
7 weeks ago


This may well be at least that bad. Apple is intentionally breaking software that millions of people rely on.

Dropping 32 bit support is inexcusable. I'm anticipating my phone ringing off the hook in the weeks after release with people needing me to remove 10.15 and reinstall 10.14.


People like this confuse me. There's a platform that offers 34 years of ABI compatibility: Windows. It's a more popular platform and cheaper too. A platform that guarantees you can stay on the same OS version for 10 years while remaining secure and supported.

I don't know why people go out of their way to choose a platform that has removed technical cruft, at the expense of breaking legacy software, for literally it's entire existence. A platform that has major API deprecations and removals yearly. Then go complain about it.
Rating: 10 Votes
7 weeks ago


I don't think any OS can compare to that disaster :rolleyes:

It really wasn't a bad OS. 3rd party drivers and Intel pushing a recycled chipset that maxed out at (IIRC) 1gb of RAM were the biggest issues. nVidia specifically was responsible for over 50% of crashes at one point, and OEMs selling laptops with the minimum amount of RAM were another headache.

On a proper laptop (like a MBP, ironically) and without bloatware, Vista was a rather good OS at launch. File IO was a tad slow, but it was otherwise reliable.

Case in point: Windows 7 was mostly just a service pack and UI facelift for Vista.

Edit: I've been corrected. The chipset issue was that it didn't "the Intel 915 GPU doesn't support WVDDM, which was required for Vista certification." Thanks [USER=995807]WaruiKoohii[/USER]. That's how you ended up with Vista ready vs Vista compatible issue too.
Rating: 9 Votes

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