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Early Prototype of Apple's Touch ID Demoed by AuthenTec Co-Founder

Apple's Touch ID fingerprint sensor, one of the core features of the iPhone 5s, has received universally positive reviews due to its simplicity, its speed, and its position as a feature that is far from gimmicky, unlike some competing products.

The fingerprint sensor technology came from AuthenTec, a small semiconductor company based in Melbourne, Florida, acquired by Apple in July of 2012. AuthenTec co-founder F. Scott Moody detailed both the company's acquisition and the technology behind Touch ID during a presentation that took place on at North Carolina State University on Tuesday, which AppleInsider attended.
[Moody] explained to the students that it’s AuthenTec’s technology behind an 8-millimeter by 8-millimeter sensor found beneath the iPhone 5s home button.

"We're looking at pores, structures of ridges and valleys, and instantaneously tell who you are," Moody said. "Every time you use it, it learns more about you. Because it knows, 'This is Alex,' every time you use it gets easier and easier."
Before Apple’s Touch ID, AuthenTec worked on the FingerLoc, a product that originally attracted Apple’s attention. FingerLoc was a bulky solution housed in a box much larger than an iPhone, which connected via ribbon cable to another, larger box.

fingerloc
Like the existing Touch ID fingerprint sensor, the FingerLoc incorporated a metal ring that functioned as a capacitor. According to Moody, AuthenTec teamed up with several dermatologists in order to perfect the capacitor, which is designed to send a signal through the outer layer of skin. "With other sensors, your ridges would collapse into the valleys," said Moody. "Ours doesn't."

Over the course of several years, AuthenTec revised and improved the FingerLoc, shrinking the size of the sensor and lowering the price point until it came up with a final product that interested several technology companies, namely Apple.
When AuthenTec came out with their final product, the company generated interest from a number of customers, including Apple, Motorola and Fujitsu. Apple, in particular, “ate it up,” Moody said, and eventually bought the entire company in 2012 for $356 million.

"We had a great team of engineers — which I think is highlighted by the fact that Apple kept the engineering team," he said.
According to Apple, AuthenTec’s Touch ID sensor captures a high-resolution image of a fingerprint, which it then analyzes to provide accurate readings. Though fears have been raised the fingerprint storage process and the security of the system, Apple has assured users that the iPhone 5s stores only fingerprint data, publishing an extensive knowledge base article detailing Touch ID.

Top Rated Comments

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11 months ago
It's sad that something like this (useful) was bought for $356M whereas something like Instagram (pointless) was bought for a billion. :rolleyes:
Rating: 35 Votes
11 months ago
Looks like the new HTC One Max. :D
Rating: 9 Votes
11 months ago

It is interesting that it reads pores etc. That level detail is impressive, I was unaware of that.

Who knew the home button could be so versatile? Apple had the perfect location already built in and millions of users all ready trained. Great forward thinking.


Yet the fandroids in mass claim Apple can't innovate. The Touch ID is a perfect example of Apple innovating, even if fingerprint identification systems have existed before on electronic devices.
Rating: 8 Votes
11 months ago
It is interesting that it reads pores etc. That level detail is impressive, I was unaware of that.

Who knew the home button could be so versatile? Apple had the perfect location already built in and millions of users all ready trained. Great forward thinking.
Rating: 6 Votes
11 months ago
So it uses a technology never before used by other fingerprint scanner and apparently significantly more accurate. Apple effectively has a lock on the best fingerprint scanner in world.

Samsung will be copying this big time.


PS, when will we see this on MacBooks?
Rating: 5 Votes
11 months ago

Yes, but I don't want to have to scan my fingerprint everytime I unlock the phone, like when I'm having a text conversation and the screen turns off in between messages. I want to only need my passcode/fingerprint every 5 or 15 mins.


The scanner is integrated into the home button. You have to press the home button to wake it up. I'm failing to see the huge inconvenience here.
Rating: 4 Votes
11 months ago
Pretty impressive how they went from that device to fitting it into a (relatively small) smartphone!
Rating: 4 Votes
11 months ago

But they didn't innovate. They bought the company that developed this technology.


To stick with the "fandroid" theme the poster you replied to began:

...But google bought the company that developed Android.
Rating: 4 Votes
11 months ago

So it uses a technology never before used by other fingerprint scanner and apparently significantly more accurate. Apple effectively has a lock on the best fingerprint scanner in world.


It's funny, android handset manufacturers have spent the last few years removing all hardware buttons from the front to make more room for the display. Now Apple used the button as a fingerprint sensor and android manufactures have resorted to putting the sensor on the back. i think we'll start to see hardware buttons make a comeback in the android world.

Of course, Samsung still has their button... and Apple has the patents.
Rating: 4 Votes
11 months ago

Having never used a password for my iPhones I thought TouchID would be the thing that converted me over. Unfortunately, I decided to switch it off after a few days for the simple fact that TouchID requires "immediate" passcode instead of allowing me to choose 5 or 10 min intervals. Having to scan my finger every min sometimes got old fast.

Anyone else feel the same? This is such a silly software choice on Apple's part.


No, because the act of pressing the home button, and leaving my finger there to unlock is actually faster and more convenient than pressing the home button, then swiping to unlock. It usually happens in one seamless step as I pull the phone out of my pocket so it's unlocked before I even look at the screen. Better security and more convenient. Win/win.
Rating: 3 Votes

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