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Foxconn Seeks to Offset Slowing Apple Growth With Software and Licensed Apple Accessories

powered_by_foxconnEarlier this month, we noted that Apple's primary manufacturing partner Foxconn/Hon Hai has been seeking to diversify its business, an effort in large part intended to offset slowing growth for Apple's products. One aspect of that effort has been a focus on televisions, with some suggesting that the work could bring benefits for Apple's rumored television set.

The Wall Street Journal now follows up with more on Foxconn's expansion plans, reporting that the company is looking at a software push into mobile applications and cloud services to complement its existing expertise in hardware. Foxconn is reportedly also moving to enter the accessory business, recognizing the relatively high profit margins available for such products. That accessory business will reportedly include officially licensed Apple accessories sold under Foxconn's own brand.
Hon Hai is also reviewing plans to make accessories such as data transmission cables, headphones and keyboards under the Foxconn brand, said executives who have direct knowledge of the plan.

"Chairman (Terry Gou) has ordered all business units to produce peripheral accessories of electronics products as it is more profitable than assembly services. We also plan to license Apple's technology to make some own-brand accessories that are compatible with iPhones and iPads," said one of the executives.
The market for third-party Apple accessories is of course already well established and offers a wide array of products, but some may hope that Foxconn's existing partnership with Apple for manufacturing of the company's flagship products could lead to innovative new accessories that could come to market more quickly than those from competitors.

Top Rated Comments

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17 months ago

We thought we get small break when bad apple slow down. This suck!


can someone interpret this for me, please?
Rating: 28 Votes
17 months ago

can someone interpret this for me, please?


He's speaking from the Foxconn employee's perspective. In proper English:

I thought I'd be allowed to get more time off when the growth of Apple – a company whose human resource policies don't value me adequately – slowed down.

Rating: 19 Votes
17 months ago
It's not slowing growth it's Apple deciding to diversify so they can't be held hostage by one production partner
Rating: 17 Votes
17 months ago
We thought we get small break when bad apple slow down. This suck!
Rating: 11 Votes
17 months ago
Why on Earth would foxconn, a company who do nothing but build hardware to other people's designs, think they can write software?
Rating: 8 Votes
17 months ago

Not that it makes sense, but he thinks that Apple is bad, and slowing it down is a good thing. Perhaps it makes more sense in his native language...


He's from Philadelphia. He's pretending to speak as a Foxconn factory worker.
Rating: 8 Votes
17 months ago

can someone interpret this for me, please?


Thanks!:D

I thought I was the only one who didn't get the meaning of that post!:confused:
Rating: 7 Votes
17 months ago

We thought we get small break when bad apple slow down. This suck!


Huh??:confused:
Rating: 7 Votes
17 months ago

Why on Earth would foxconn, a company who do nothing but build hardware to other people's designs, think they can write software?


What evidence is there to suggest that they cannot? :confused:

Sounds as naive a presumption as somebody in the last decade saying: "Why on Earth would Apple, a company who do nothing but build computers, think they can take over the music industry and make phones"
Rating: 5 Votes
17 months ago

Why on Earth would foxconn, a company who do nothing but build hardware to other people's designs, think they can write software?


They have their own TV sets, running their own firmware. Works very well too. They have also built TV's and written firmware for others for years. Same goes for monitors and other related products. They do a fair amount of 'off brand' stuff, most of which they do the firmware for.

Why on earth would you assume a company with all their money and manpower wont be able to setup a dedicated software division :rolleyes:
Rating: 5 Votes

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