Nomad Wants to Make a 3" Apple-Certified Lightning Cable for Your Keychain

The Nomad Lightning Cable for iPhone 5 and iPad mini is a 3" Lightning to USB cable that's trying to become a real product via social crowd funding website Kickstarter. The cable is designed to attach to a keyring and uses an Apple certified lightning connector.


Kegan and Roberto, the duo behind the Nomad, say in the pitch video on their Kickstarter page that having bought unofficial Lightning connectors and having them not work inspired them to buy their connectors directly from Apple-certified manufacturers. Recently, there have been a number of unofficial lightning cables springing up.


The prototypes were built by a Chinese manufacturer that produces iPhone accessories, according to the Kickstarter page. The duo will choose one of three Chinese manufacturers to produce the final products once funding is complete.

The project is about $16,000 away from its $29,000 goal with about 20 days to go to become a reality. Kegan and Roberto are taking pledges starting at $1 for the project. Backers who pledge $5 or more receive a Nomad, although the lower-end pledge tiers are sold out ($5, $9, $10 and $15 tiers at the time of this writing). Pledging support for the Kickstarter project is more like an investment and does not always mean that you'll receive the final product, as there's no guarantee that the project succeeds and becomes a reality. Pledges aren't charged unless they hit their target goal.

More details on how Kickstarter works can be found in its Frequently Asked Questions.

Related roundup: iPhone 6

Top Rated Comments

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Posted: 24 months ago
I like your writing style. I can see why you were recruited as an MR writer. What did you do before this if I may ask?
Rating: 8 Votes
Posted: 24 months ago
My keychain already has too many things on it!
Rating: 5 Votes
Posted: 24 months ago

I like your writing style. I can see why you were recruited as an MR writer. What did you do before this if I may ask?


Thanks! I interned at Gizmodo and did/do some writing for a film site.
Rating: 5 Votes
Posted: 24 months ago

Thanks! I interned at Gizmodo and did/do some writing for a film site.


Gizmodo?! Uh oh. They have some pretty immature journalists. The quality of that website has deteriorated quickly.
Rating: 4 Votes
Posted: 24 months ago
How about a Thunderbolt flash drive instead? :)
Rating: 3 Votes
Posted: 24 months ago
Worried the product will detach from the cap too easily and be gone. I would prefer this idea.
http://www.scosche.com/consumer-tech/product/2214

http://www.scosche.com/consumer-tech/product/1906
Rating: 3 Votes
Posted: 24 months ago
Good idea - I'm sure it'd come in handy :)
Rating: 2 Votes
Posted: 24 months ago

Gizmodo?! Uh oh. They have some pretty immature journalists. The quality of that website has deteriorated quickly.


Well, he's not working there now, so that must be good news. :p
Rating: 2 Votes
Posted: 24 months ago
"Pledging support for the Kickstarter project is more like an investment"

Wrong answer. Pledges are not investments. They are pre-buys. If the project reaches the funding goal then your credit card gets charged. If the project ships then you receive your product. This has nothing to do with investments. You do not own part of the project. As a backer you do not get a financial return on your money. You get a product. Or as Kickstarter likes to call it, a reward.

We ran a very successful Kickstarter project for our family's on-farm butcher shop. We raise pastured pigs and deliver year round to local stores and restaurants as well as individuals. Initially we had funded our project in part through CSA Pre-Buys of pigs (http://SugarMtnFarm.com/csa). This spring we did a Kickstarter project to raise $25,000 more in funds to help with construction. We got $33,000 in backing. Some of that (10%) goes to Kickstarter and Amazon. About half of it goes to fulfill rewards which consists of shipments of our pastured pork once the butcher shop is up and running. The remainder is what goes into equipment and concrete to make our project happen.

If you are curious about the outcoming of a successful (Macintosh based no less) project check out:

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/sugarmtnfarm/building-a-butcher-shop-on-sugarmountainfarm

and you can read more about our butcher shop at:

http://SugarMtnFarm.com/butchershop

Monday we make our final structural concrete pour when we'll pour the upper bond beam and ceilings of our building. Then we get to work on the interior during the winter.

It is important to understand that Kickstarter projects are pre-buys of product and they are not investments. This is both a legal and an economic distinction.

Cheers,

-Walter Jeffries
Sugar Mountain Farm
Rating: 2 Votes
Posted: 24 months ago

The article said it was "like an investment". I doubt anybody took away from that thinking they were getting equity in the company. It's like an investment in the sense that you are giving a company money without a guarantee of any return. In this case, the return is what Kickstarter calls the "reward" or the product.

Point is: it's not a store. You are giving companies money and there's a chance that you will get nothing in return.



It is specifically NOT like an investment. This is a legal issue having to do with regulations on investing. Kickstarter is MUCH more like a store than anything else. It is a store for PRE-selling.
Rating: 1 Votes

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