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Verizon CEO: We Expected iPhone 5 in Early Summer, Now Planning For Fall


Incoming Verizon CEO Lowell McAdam, speaking on CNBC today, noted that revenue growth in the past quarter had been impacted because the next iPhone hasn't been released yet.
We had assumed that we would see an iPhone early in the summertime as it's been usually, and that's going to be a little bit later in the year now.
In a conference call with analysts today, McAdam suggested analysts check with Apple on when the next iPhone will come out -- but expected it this fall:
We are probably what I would view as maybe a quarter behind what we had talked about in January, primarily because we expected an iPhone 5 refresh sometime this summer.

We don't know when the next one is going to come out. You will have to ask Apple that, but we expect that probably sometime in the fall, and I think you will see a significant jump there when we get to that point.
Later in the CNBC interview, McAdam discusses Verizon's switch to tiered data plans for smartphones, noting that streaming video is the main reason they dropped unlimited data plans:
We just converted over to tiered pricing, data tiered pricing, because we see a huge wave of video coming. That's going to take a lot more capacity in the individual networks, and so I think for a lot of customers that won't be an issue from a revenue perspective. But, for the heavy users, we do see the revenue go up significantly.
Lowell McAdam is the current COO of Verizon and will be replacing current CEO Ivan Seidenberg.

Top Rated Comments

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40 months ago

Its too bad the iPhone 5 won't have LTE :( at least I doubt it... Deal breaker for me.


I can see the desire for 4G (other than bulk and battery-burning, which will be solved in time). Still, every other phone has much bigger deal-breakers:

* Fewer apps, but more importantly: lower-quality apps. Even those apps that do have Android versions are seldom as good (http://www.technologyreview.com/blog/mimssbits/26647/).

* Poor battery life. Potentially "solveable" by manually managing processes and troubleshooting your apps to find out the hard way which ones you shouldn’t have downloaded. No, thanks.

* No retina display? I’ll never go back!

* Android devices are frequently abandoned by the manufacturer and/or carrier, and get no further updates. Now, no device lasts forever; but Android devices get obsolete way too fast.

* Fragmentation: it’s not just a problem for programmers, but for users, when big-name, important apps only work on certain selected models.

* No iCloud? Well, I don’t have it yet, either... but it’s coming, and nothing out there can offer what Apple is offering with iCloud.

* Malware apps. Compare the percentage of users impacted on Android vs. on iPhone.

* Where’s the integrated music store and synching? Where are the movies and TV shows? Android solutions for those are painful half-efforts compared to iTunes.

* No serious tablet companion with a serious library of tablet apps.

And the number one Android deal-breaker for me:

* No full backup/restore! When I replace my iPhone, everything down to the last custom setting and icon placement transfers over. Every song, every document, every high score, every password, every carefully-organized folder with an Emoji icon. On Android, a few things synch to the new device, but the rest is lost in the wind. Unacceptable.

I really hope (and believe) that someone will make a flavor of Android that solves all that, someday. For now, 4G LTE absolutely can’t make up for them.

For now, while Google TALKS in vague buzzword terms about giving me more things I can do with my phone, Apple actually does so! Android is still too limiting.

I hope my 2012 iPhone has 4G (I’m sure it will) but I also hope it doesn’t suffer the problems (bulk and battery drain) of current 4G phones.
Rating: 12 Votes
40 months ago
Its too bad the iPhone 5 won't have LTE :( at least I doubt it... Deal breaker for me.
Rating: 10 Votes
40 months ago

When you look at real world performance of LTE vs HSDPA+ bringing comparable speeds, why would LTE be a deal breaker?


Because my real world tethering brings down 28mb while your HSDPA brings down 10.

So ya real world its a deal breaker.
Rating: 7 Votes
40 months ago

Why? It's just a big battery drainer at the moment and Verizon is still expanding their coverage.


No its not, only on the TBolt. And they have LTE in 120 cities... including every city around my area = millions of people. This is a ridiculous comment.
Rating: 7 Votes
40 months ago

Its too bad the iPhone 5 won't have LTE :( at least I doubt it... Deal breaker for me.

Why? It's just a big battery drainer at the moment and Verizon is still expanding their coverage.
Rating: 6 Votes
40 months ago

I can see the desire for 4G (other than bulk and battery-burning, which will be solved in time). Still, every other phone has much bigger deal-breakers:

* Fewer apps, but more importantly: lower-quality apps. Even those apps that do have Android versions are seldom as good (http://www.technologyreview.com/blog/mimssbits/26647/).

* Poor battery life. Potentially "solveable" by manually managing processes and troubleshooting your apps to find out the hard way which ones you shouldn’t have downloaded. No, thanks.

* No retina display? I’ll never go back!

* Android devices are frequently abandoned by the manufacturer and/or carrier, and get no further updates. Now, no device lasts forever; but Android devices get obsolete way too fast.

* Fragmentation: it’s not just a problem for programmers, but for users, when big-name, important apps only work on certain selected models.

* No iCloud? Well, I don’t have it yet, either... but it’s coming, and nothing out there can offer what Apple is offering with iCloud.

* Malware apps. Compare the percentage of users impacted on Android vs. on iPhone.

* Where’s the integrated music store and synching? Where are the movies and TV shows? Android solutions for those are painful half-efforts compared to iTunes.

* No serious tablet companion with a serious library of tablet apps.

And the number one Android deal-breaker for me:

* No full backup/restore! When I replace my iPhone, everything down to the last custom setting and icon placement transfers over. Every song, every document, every high score, every password, every carefully-organized folder with an Emoji icon. On Android, a few things synch to the new device, but the rest is lost in the wind. Unacceptable.

I really hope (and believe) that someone will make a flavor of Android that solves all that, someday. For now, 4G LTE absolutely can’t make up for them.

For now, while Google TALKS in vague buzzword terms about giving me more things I can do with my phone, Apple actually does so! Android is still too limiting.

I hope my 2012 iPhone has 4G (I’m sure it will) but I also hope it doesn’t suffer the problems (bulk and battery drain) of current 4G phones.



1. Fewer apps - you probably don't have 200 million apps on your phone, am I correct? Every single app I own on iPhone is on android and just as good in quality.

2. Poor battery on SOME phones, not all. The TBOLT is horrible, but the charge is actually very good.

3. Retina is great, but go check out the super amoled plus displays.

4. Abandoned - not really. 3 year old android phones were updated to gingerbread. Thats the latest and greatest OS for phones... Some manufacturers are bad, but then again you wouldn't buy a phone from them right?

5. Fragmentation - solved by rooting your phone and a custom rom, but yes, I agree here.

6. Google has its own cloud. Apple just put a spiffy name on something that already exists.

7. Malware apps only appeared when you side loaded apps from OUTSIDE the market - which you can't even do on Apple without jailbreak... In this case you run the EXACT same risk.

8. Google Music

9. Not yet, but this is a phone discussion. No tablet compliments your phone, they compliment your computer.

10. Settings are saved at google so if you need to restore, all your settings return. Also, all of the apps you HAD on your phone will restore back to your phone. Individual app preferences and data will not.. which yes is good for the iPhone if thats what you really want it to do.

11. Most of it (all but 2) are on android. I think you should check out the Galaxy SII when it comes out in the US (or if its out where you live).
Rating: 6 Votes
40 months ago
I like this guy. He spills lots of beans. :D
Rating: 5 Votes
40 months ago

His argument for tiered pricing actually made sense and seemed fair.


Really? How is offering faster speeds and marketing all the awesome things you can do with it fair when you turn right around and cap the hell out of people. Sure right now, many 3G users won't be affected by these caps... but with faster data speeds/phones and cloud & streaming services, it's crippling the true functionality of the devices while increasing revenue for the carrier. That is not fair.
Rating: 5 Votes
40 months ago

No its not, only on the TBolt. And they have LTE in 120 cities... including every city around my area = millions of people. This is a ridiculous comment.


Not from what I've read... battery life seems to be an issue on many of the 4G Android based phones. The Thunderbolt just seems to be the worst.

Glad to hear you live in a 4G area... not here yet.

BTW... the other poster is right about the Droid Charge... it seems to do very well with battery life in 3G or 4G mode.... so maybe it's not the 4G but just the others are poorly built phones????? Don't know?
Rating: 5 Votes
40 months ago

i can see the desire for 4g (other than bulk and battery-burning, which will be solved in time). Still, every other phone has much bigger deal-breakers:

* fewer apps, but more importantly: Lower-quality apps. Even those apps that do have android versions are seldom as good (http://www.technologyreview.com/blog/mimssbits/26647/).

* poor battery life. Potentially "solveable" by manually managing processes and troubleshooting your apps to find out the hard way which ones you shouldn’t have downloaded. No, thanks.

* no retina display? I’ll never go back!

* android devices are frequently abandoned by the manufacturer and/or carrier, and get no further updates. Now, no device lasts forever; but android devices get obsolete way too fast.

* fragmentation: It’s not just a problem for programmers, but for users, when big-name, important apps only work on certain selected models.

* no icloud? Well, i don’t have it yet, either... But it’s coming, and nothing out there can offer what apple is offering with icloud.

* malware apps. Compare the percentage of users impacted on android vs. On iphone.

* where’s the integrated music store and synching? Where are the movies and tv shows? Android solutions for those are painful half-efforts compared to itunes.

* no serious tablet companion with a serious library of tablet apps.

And the number one android deal-breaker for me:

* no full backup/restore! When i replace my iphone, everything down to the last custom setting and icon placement transfers over. Every song, every document, every high score, every password, every carefully-organized folder with an emoji icon. On android, a few things synch to the new device, but the rest is lost in the wind. Unacceptable.

I really hope (and believe) that someone will make a flavor of android that solves all that, someday. For now, 4g lte absolutely can’t make up for them.

For now, while google talks in vague buzzword terms about giving me more things i can do with my phone, apple actually does so! Android is still too limiting.

I hope my 2012 iphone has 4g (i’m sure it will) but i also hope it doesn’t suffer the problems (bulk and battery drain) of current 4g phones.


amen!!!!!
Rating: 5 Votes

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