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Sprint Bundles Spotify Premium Into New 'Framily' Plans

sprint_logo-250x124Sprint today announced that it will start bundling Spotify Premium with its new Framily plans, offering a discount on the service for customers with multiple lines. The music streaming service is part of the company's new Sprint Sound Sessions program and will be available starting May 9th.

Under the new program, all new and existing postpaid customers on a Framily plan are eligible for a free, six-month trial of Spotify Premium that is followed by an 18-month discount on the premium service when the free trial is over. Framily customers will pay $7.99 per month for the paid service or $4.99 monthly if the Framily plan has more than six members. After 24 months, customers will pay the standard price for Spotify Premium, which is currently $9.99 per month.

Subscribers outside the Framily plan will receive a 3-month free trial and incur charges of $9.99 monthly when the free trial ends. All charges for the service will be added to a customer's monthly bill.
“With Spotify, people literally have all of the world’s music in their pockets,” said Daniel Ek, Spotify founder and CEO. “Spotify and Sprint share a passion for music and technology that makes this partnership a natural fit for both companies -- and the best music deal ever for Sprint customers.”
Spotify's Premium tier allows users to listen to Spotify's entire 20 million song library with support for unlimited on-demand listening and custom playlists. The service recently extended its free tier to iPhone users, allowing them to listen to pre-compiled playlists and shuffled music based on a specific artist or song.

This new Sprint partnership is not the first carrier tie-up for the Swedish-based music service. Spotify also bundles its Premium service with cellular plans from Vodafone throughout Europe. As a result, Spotify's growth has been accelerating, and the streaming service may soon eclipse Apple's iTunes downloads as Europe's biggest digital music service in terms of revenue.

Top Rated Comments

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Posted: 20 weeks ago

Framily???? I never noticed this is the actual name they use for the plan. I'd feel like an idiot asking for that plan out loud :eek: :D


You can say it out loud in a Sprint store, not many people will hear it.
Rating: 7 Votes
Posted: 20 weeks ago
Sprint users now have even more ways to do nothing on their phones.
Rating: 4 Votes
Posted: 20 weeks ago
Framily???? I never noticed this is the actual name they use for the plan. I'd feel like an idiot asking for that plan out loud :eek: :D
Rating: 4 Votes
Posted: 20 weeks ago
I like all the aggressiveness in the mobile space, but I do have to say that of all the commercials that are out there, I hate the framily ones more than any.
Rating: 3 Votes
Posted: 20 weeks ago
Yes instead of making the service better they bundle in services that don't make the network any more appealing.

After 10 years with Sprint I switched to Tmobile in March and haven't looked back, call quality and data service has been phenomenal in New York. Not a single dropped call and I can download a 25 MB ESPN podcast in 30 seconds vs. the 15 minutes it would take after timing out twice on Sprint.

Good riddance.
Rating: 2 Votes
Posted: 20 weeks ago

How about data caps? Or is this outside the cap? Seems like a good way to run up your bill.


Audio streaming doesn't do much. I stream Spotify over cellular for about 60 hours a month and it doesn't even eat 1 GB during the month. I used to use iHeartRadio and found the data consumption was similar.
Rating: 2 Votes
Posted: 20 weeks ago

Framily???? I never noticed this is the actual name they use for the plan. I'd feel like an idiot asking for that plan out loud :eek: :D


I don't care what they call it, it saves me about $50 a month...
Rating: 1 Votes
Posted: 20 weeks ago

Thanks for that. Was always curious. What kind of quality is that? Like good enough for a phone quality, or good enough to stream/plug into your car and it sound good through your car system?


I find it good enough for my car stereo. I am not an audiophile - I know my brother always asks me how I can tolerate the low quality of Spotify free. I can kind of hear the difference, but it definitely isn't something I'd bother paying for.
Rating: 1 Votes
Posted: 20 weeks ago

How about data caps? Or is this outside the cap? Seems like a good way to run up your bill.


This is exactly what we don't want: Data access companies (carriers) giving free access to favored platforms. This goes against the principle of net neutrality, and could potentially harm smaller start up companies which don't have the resources to negotiate with the carriers. For instance, if these provisions had been in place in the 90s, we'd likely still be using terrible AOL or maybe even Microsoft services because they would have the market cornered. Smaller companies like Yahoo and Google would be cornered out of the market because they are a startup that didn't have the resources to spend to buy bandwidth. Hell, forget about Spotify. iTunes probably wouldn't have taken off either. Relative to the available bandwidth in the early 2000s, iTunes used quite a large share. The iPod was just getting going. This would have stifled all kinds of innovation. DRM would be even more horrifying and prevalent. I can't even imagine how scary the internet would be today if that had happened.
Rating: 1 Votes
Posted: 20 weeks ago

Made-up portmanteaus can't go away soon enough.

:mad::mad::mad::mad::mad::mad:


Aren't all portmanteaus made up? Some just catch on (ex. 'smog') while others don't.
Rating: 1 Votes

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