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Apple Joins Digital Due Process Coalition


The EFF has announced that both Apple and Dropbox have joined the Digital Due Process (DDP) coalition which is focused on pressing Congress to update the Electronic Communications Privacy Act.
ECPA was passed by Congress in 1986, before the World Wide Web was even invented and when cell phones were still a rarity. Yet to this day, ECPA is the primary law governing how and when law enforcement can access personal information and private communications stored by communications providers like Google, Facebook, your cell phone company or your ISP.
Specifically, the DDP is supporting amendments to ensure the government can't track your cell phone or obtain online content such as emails, photos, documents and backup files without first going to court to get a search warrant.

According to the EFF, the current version of the ECPA is vague on whether these documents and information -- including the tracking of your cell phone -- are presently protected from government intrusion without any form of warrant.

Other coalition members include Amazon, Intel, AT&T, Google and many more.

Thanks Aaron

Top Rated Comments

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42 months ago
Seems like governments everywhere are pushing to get power to invade our privacy without obtaining a warrant. Good on Apple and the rest of them for standing up to the government (who no doubt want to exercise these powers "for the public good, trust us, and amen").
Rating: 8 Votes
42 months ago
It's nice to see corporations advocating for laws that protect the customer.

Now if only we could get cellphone carriers to support a law against cellphone locking and movie labels supporting a repeal of the DMCA. ;)
Rating: 7 Votes
42 months ago
Willing to bet that this will somehow be integrated into the Bush Patriot Act or something....since we lost many freedoms when that piece of legislation was passed!
Rating: 5 Votes
42 months ago
The spook agencies do whatever they want. And there is nothing private companies can do about it.
Rating: 5 Votes
42 months ago
Wake up Mr. Ives, wake up...and smell, the ashes.

Rating: 5 Votes
42 months ago

Willing to bet that this will somehow be integrated into the Bush Patriot Act or something....since we lost many freedoms when that piece of legislation was passed!


And who just re-signed that act?
Thank you.
Carry on.
Rating: 4 Votes
42 months ago
+1 for Apple etc., but what’s the point.

The spook agencies do whatever they want. And there is nothing private companies can do about it.


The spook agencies do whatever they want. And there is nothing the government can do about it.

And who just re-signed that act?
Thank you.
Carry on.


Not only that, but (my) Senator Al “Patriot Act” Franken, who had that gall to blast Apple over a red herring of a privacy issue.
Rating: 4 Votes
42 months ago
Noticeably absent from that list: facebook.

My mistake, they are on the website, just not on the blurb.
Rating: 3 Votes
42 months ago
This reminds me of the guy that was busted for child pornography by the TSA. They mis-used their power to catch a guy for something far beyond the reaches of transportation security.

This kind of thing should, at the least, require as much energy as our personal residences.
Rating: 2 Votes
42 months ago

It still had to go through Congress (which is currently in Republican control) before being re-signed. It's always puzzled me as to why Republicans so strongly support the patriot act when they try to reduce to role of government in everything else.

(fwiw, I'm a registered independent. I hate how the only way for a politician to get elected is for him/her to have either extreme left or extreme right views. IMO the ideal balance would be somewhere in the middle)


1) It going through Congress is moot to the point that Obama signed it. The President has veto power and could have let the Act die by not signing it b/c doubtful Congress would be able to override the veto.

2) If you are going to make a big deal of it going through Congress keep in mind half of the U.S. Congress is the Senate, controlled by Democrats. So Democrats actually had two chances to kill the Act and declined.

3) Republicans, at least on paper, are against "Big Goverment," but they are not anarchists. Don't confuse "reducing the role of government" to no government. Republicans are not inconsistent in stating national defense is a vital role of government because it's one the individual cannot accomplish.

4) Neither the Congress nor the President is above the Constitution. Congress can pass laws all day and the President can sign them but if they conflict with the Constitution the Third Branch will strike it down.

5) Most candidates campaign in the middle -- that is how they win. It's only after they win that they veer left or right. Then when campaign season is upon us they wander back to the middle. Look at any General Election campaign ad, GOP or DEM. They go after the "independent" voter because they already have the base sewn up.
Rating: 2 Votes

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