New in OS X: Get MacRumors Push Notifications on your Mac

Resubscribe Now Close

Bungie's Marathon Officially Coming to iPad

Early Beta screenshot

Bungie has posted on their official blog an interview with iOS developer Daniel Blezek who has been working on porting Marathon to the iPad. Blezek has been working on this project for some time but there were initially questions about the legal issue related to distributing Marathon's original level packs.

Based on notes from the interview, however, it seems that this is now a Bungie-sanctioned port.
For many, Marathon will invoke a wave of nostalgia; for others, this will be the first experience with the seminal Mac FPS. I hope all players appreciate Bungie's commitment to their fans. It's not every company who would support bringing a 16 year old game back to life!
Marathon is a first person shooter developed by Bungie Software for the Macintosh in 1994. It was a Mac exclusive launch and was released shortly after Doom first debuted for the PC. Bungie later went on to be acquired by Microsoft and released the popular Halo game series for the Xbox. Halo was originally developed for the Mac as well, but the release was delayed after Microsoft's acquisition.

The iPad version of the game has reportedly been submitted and will be released for free.

Top Rated Comments

(View all)

44 months ago

oh no more clutter on the app store ffs


I could say the same thing about your posts....:rolleyes:
Rating: 10 Votes
44 months ago
I remember me and my friend playing this game in a dark room with the sound through a big amp... When those aliens suddenly appeared behind us we used to scream like little girls :D

classic!
Rating: 4 Votes
44 months ago
video of original Mac version

Rating: 4 Votes
44 months ago
Liking it - but it's more fun on an old Mac... ;)
Rating: 2 Votes
44 months ago
If they get this out for iPad, I would love to see Oni get out. That was one game that was rushed out too fast. The surge in anime interest in the USA could really turn Oni into what it should have been in the first place.
Rating: 2 Votes
44 months ago
If they were smart they would re-release it for the Mac via the App Store. Along with it's sequels which if I recall did have primitive and quite slow online play. I'd play the HELL outta that game.
Rating: 2 Votes
44 months ago
All over the ship, dancing through the wreckage of the Pfhor computer core, DURANDAL WAS LAUGHING
this makes my sig so relevant
Rating: 2 Votes
43 months ago

Free? Why is it free? I don't see any iAds on that screenshot. Why would they do this for free?


Bungie released the Marathon series as open source software just before MS bought them out (presumably so MS wouldn't own it). Bungie is completely irrelevant to this story... other than the tremendous amount of credit they deserve for originally making the series.

Being Bungie sanctioned, as the article states, is completely inconsequential to the development and release. This would be like saying the Firefox browser is sanctioned by Netscape (I know, I know, Mozilla was... but that was a long time ago).

Daniel Blezek deserves credit for bringing Marathon to the iPad, the article serves to discredit his work by indicating that Bungie has anything to do with this at all (besides blogging about it). The fact that there is no mention at all of Aleph One, the engine that will no doubt be used, and depriving credit to all it's developers is downright rude of MR.
Rating: 1 Votes
43 months ago
I want me some Bolo too!
Rating: 1 Votes
43 months ago

I disagree. Marathon is all right but compared to Doom, Marathon's movement is awkward, its level designs a convoluted jumble, and its graphical textures murky -- chalk it up to ambiance if you want, but I think it was more inexperience on Bungie's part and the insufficient hardware of the time.
I found Durandal to be a much better game and still play it every few months on my Xbox 360.


Very much agreed.


None of the above (whether one agrees or not) really refutes the initial point, which is more about the content. Doom's premise is, to be charitable, threadbare, the thinnest possible excuse for putting the player in an environment they say is a base on Mars and fighting against demons from hell. There really isn't any more to it than that, and the mixture of environment designs is schizophrenic to say the least, a trend that would continue in iD's next hit, Quake.

Marathon creates a detailed and believable world, with art direction working harmoniously with the text of the story told through the game's AI terminals. Effort was put into making the maps functional and believable in many cases, and Marathon's world is not, generally speaking, strewn with burning, explosive barrels for no reason other than that they blow up real good.

Level designs a convoluted jumble? One might well say that they took advantage of the pseudo 3D of the time to make legitimate labyrinths that required a deliberate effort to explore, something that rarely is the case in today's high definition shooters, and something I miss.

Murky textures? I don't think we're talking about the same game. Textures onboard the colony ship Marathon are shiny and high-tech; it's actually Doom that's muddy a lot of the time, with everything moving towards a muddy red-brown as the game progresses and the player ventures further and further into Hell. Often, Doom levels appeared to be entirely abstract, and the idea of being on an extraplanetary base or on the surface of another world was more a mild suggestion.

No disagreement that Marathon 2 is in many ways a superior game, but I felt at the time and feel now that in many ways that are important, Marathon was a competent and fully-realized story-based shooter in ways that Doom in all its incarnations, new and old, never really was. In many ways Marathon is better than its stepchild, Halo.
Rating: 1 Votes

[ Read All Comments ]